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Full text of "The Spirit of Christ - for All of Life: Seventeenth Annual Report of the Woman's Division of Christian Service of the Board of Missions and Church Extension of The Methodist Church, Reports June 1, 1955-May 31, 1956, Roster of Officers June 1, 1956-May 31, 1957"

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Seventeenth 
Annual Report 



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WOMAN'S DIVISION OF CHRISTIAN SERVICE 
OF THE BOARD OF MISSIONS OF THE METHODIST CHURCH 



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^Jhe Spirit of i^hridt 

Pop ~Arti of oLlte 



COVER DESIGN 

The symbol for the quadrennial goals — a circle 
embracing the whole world — shows the figure 
of Christ with feet in motion as if moving into 
all the world, and hands outstretched as if in 
blessing or beckoning. The sheaves of wheat 
represent the bread of life or the fullness of 
life taught, lived, and shared by Jesus Christ. 



SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Woman's Division of Christian Service 

OF THE 

Board of Missions of The Methodist Church 

Reports June 1, 1955— May 31, 1956 
Roster of Officers June 1, 1956— May 31, 1951 

HEADQUARTERS: 150 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 11, NEW YORK 





MRS. FRANK G. BROOKS MRS. J. FOUNT TILLMAN 



rotewotd 



"^■^HE Spirit of Christ — for All of Life" is the theme, well known by now, 

/that will guide us in this new quadrennium. In a certain sense these words 

**->* lead us into a new era in the history of the Woman's Division of Christian 

Service. No longer are there any members on the Woman's Division who came in 

at its formation in 1940. Only seven who were on the staff at the time of unification 

are staff members now. 

But the program of the Woman's Division goes on! The plan of tenure for 
the officers of the Woman's Division — eight years — is good. New members come 
into the Woman's Division each quadrennium. 

In many respects, the growth of the Woman's Society of Christian Service and 
the Wesleyan Service Guild has been phenomenal. There are now 1,841,919 adult 
members, 31,014 Woman's Societies and 5,373 Wesleyan Service Guilds. Our 
income in 1955-56 was $10,561,367.20, of which $8,434,420.95 came as pledges from 
the conferences. The total increase in giving over the previous quadrennium was 
$7,834,660.29. 

The increase in membership and the increase in income have made possible 
new developments in the three departments of the Woman's Division. The produc- 
tion and sale of literature has exceeded any previous year. The promotional and edu- 
cational program, in its varied facets, has reached, through jurisdiction, conference, 
and district, every woman in the Woman's Society or the Wesleyan Service Guild 
in the local church. 

I should like to make my closing words a very personal message to each one 
of you. This is the last Foreword to an annual report that I shall write. My eight 
years as president of the Woman's Division of Christian Service have been filled 
with rich fellowship with members of the Woman's Division and the staff. The 
interest and the loyalty of the Societies and Guilds have made possible the greatness 
which the organization has achieved. 

In our size, our "bigness," let us not forget our heritage. It is something we 
must earn in order to possess it. Let us remember that if we forget the greatness 
of yesterday, we are not likely to find the glory of tomorrow. 

With this thought, I pass the responsibility, the joy, and the task to the new 
president of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, Mrs. J. Fount Tillman of 
Lewisburg, Tennessee. 

Mrs. Tillman is a devout, consecrated woman who will give of her time, her 
talents, her all to the heavy responsibilities of the presidency. Mrs. Tillman has been 
a conference president. This past quadrennium she has been one of the vice-presidents 
of the Woman's Division, serving as chairman of the Department of Christian Social 
Relations. 

In every way Mrs. Tillman is well qualified to serve as president of the Woman's 
Division. She will count upon you for your loyal support in the future as I have in 
the past. 

I commend Mrs. Tillman to you and you to her. May the spirit of Christ truly 
guide us in all our life as, together, we face a new quadrennium! 

President, Woman's Division of Christian Service 
3 



QUADRENNIAL GOALS— 1956-1960 



ZJke spirit of Hiridt — *jror ^ttt of cJLife 



The Call: To every member of every 

Woman's Society of Christian Service 
and Wesleyan Service Guild — 



TO COMMIT HERSELF TO THE SPIRIT AND PRINCIPLES OF CHRIST 
FOR THE WHOLE WORLD 

By 

Studying to know the spirit and principles of Christ. 
Seeking personally to obtain the spirit of Christ. 
Practicing the principles of Christ in everyday living. 
Communicating to others the joy of discovering Christ. 



TO ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY IN THE TOTAL PROGRAM OF THE 
LOCAL CHURCH 

By 
Attending church services regularly. 

Giving time, talent, and support systematically and thoughtfully. 
Sharing in church and community programs for all age groups. 
Helping train youth and students for Christian responsibility. 



TO INTERPRET THE PLACE OF THE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 
OF THE WOMAN'S DIVISION OF CHRISTIAN SERVICE IN THE WORLD 
MISSION OF THE CHURCH 

By 

Making known the objectives of these educational institutions. 
Showing how they are related to the world mission of the church. 

4 



TO CONFRONT THE LOCAL CHURCH WITH THE CHALLENGE OF 
RECRUITMENT FOR MISSIONARY AND DEACONESS SERVICE 

By 

Cooperating through every channel of missionary education. 

Alerting young people to the needs of the world. 

Creating an awareness of the diversity of opportunities in missionary 



TO CREATE A FELLOWSHIP WITHOUT BARRIERS IN LOCAL CHURCH 
AND COMMUNITY 

By 

Practicing the principles in the Charter of Racial Policies of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Welcoming into worship and service all who seek to follow Christ. 

Urging persons of all cultures and races into the fellowship and ac- 
tivities of the church. 



TO IDENTIFY HERSELF WITH PEOPLES OF THE WORLD 

By 

Becoming acquainted with the missionary program. 

Evaluating her own personal relationships with others. 

Cultivating opportunities to learn from people of all races and cultures. 

Losing herself in the joy, sorrow, needs, and achievements of others. 

Giving of self, time, and possessions for others. 



TO SPEAK AND ACT BOLDLY IN CHRIST'S NAME FOR JUSTICE AND 
PEACE FOR ALL PEOPLE 

By 

Standing with courage and strength for the principles of Christ. 
Studying to understand the meaning of justice and peace for all. 
Practicing peace and justice in daily attitudes. 

Supporting the United Nations in its program for justice and peace. 

5 



Woman's Division of Christian Service 

of the 

Board of Missions 
The Methodist Church 

150 Fifth Avenue, New York 11, N. Y. 
(Cable Address: MISSIONS, NEW YORK) 

OFFICERS 

President 

Mrs. J. Fount Tillman R. F. D. 1, Lewisburg, Term. 

Vice-President 

Mrs. T. Otto Nall 2748 Marcy Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Vice-President 

(Chairman of Department of Work in Foreign Fields) 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 234 North Street, Newburgh, N. Y. 

Vice-President 

(Chairman of Department of Work in Home Fields) 
Mrs. C. P. Hardin 108 S. Crest Road, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Vice-President 

(Chairman of Department of Christian Social Relations) 
Mrs. A. R. Henry 608 Wilson Avenue, Menomonie, Wis. 

Recording Secretary 

Mrs. J. Ernest Wilkins 4708 Blagden Terrace N. W., Washington 11, D. C. 

Treasurer 

Miss Marguerite Harris 150 Fifth Avenue, New York 11, N. Y. 

Assistant Treasurers for Departments 

Miss Hazel M. Best (Foreign) 150 Fifth Avenue, New York 11, N. Y. 

Miss Marguerite Hawkins (Home) 150 Fifth Avenue, New York 11, N. Y. 

Disbursing Officer 

Mrs. Alice C. Williams 150 Fifth Avenue, New York 11, N. Y. 

6 



Administration 7 

(Addresses are 150 Fifth Avenue, New York 11, N. Y., unless otherwise stated) 

Executive Secretaries 
Department of Work in Foreign Fields 

Africa and Europe: Miss Ruth Lawrence 

India and Pakistan: Miss Lucile Colont 

Japan and Korea : Miss Margaret Billingsley 

Latin America: Miss Marian L. Derby 

Southeast Asia and China: Miss Clara M. French 

Medical Secretary: Dr. Harold N. Brewster (Dr. Bruce W. Jarvis, acting) 

Associate Secretary: Mrs. F. Roderick Dail 
Department of Work in Home Fields 

Deaconess Work: Miss Mary Lou Barnwell 

Educational Institutions: Miss Muriel Day 

Social Welfare and Medical Work: Miss Emma Burris 

Town and Country: Miss L. Cornelia Russell 

Urban Work: Mrs. Mabel Garrett Wagner 

Assistant Secretary: Miss Ruth Pope 
Department of Christian Social Relations 

Miss Thelma Stevens 
Associate Secretaries 

Mrs. Clifford A. Bender, Miss Ethel L. Watkins 

Section of Education and Cultivation 
Executive Secretary Assistant to Executive Secretary 

Miss Dorcas Hall Mrs. Maude White Hardie 

Secretary of Missionary Education Assistant to Secretary of Missionary Education 

Miss Elizabeth Stinson Mrs - c - b - Knapp 

Secretary of Wesleyan Service Guild 

Miss Lillian A. Johnson 
Associate Secretaries 

Field Cultivation: Miss Harriet Seibert; Student Work: Miss Dorothy Nyland; 

Youth Work: Miss Helen L. Johnson; Children's Work: Miss Ruby Van Hooser; 

Visual Education: Miss Elizabeth Marchant 
Editor — World Outlook and other Joint Literature Publications 

Miss Dorothy McConnell 
Field Workers 

Miss Theressa Hoover Mrs. W. B. Landrum Miss E. Louise Nichols 

Secretaries of Missionary Personnel 

Miss Alpharetta Leeper Miss Marguerite Twinem 

Miss Jane Stentz, Associate 

Editors 
Editor of Literature: Miss Juanita Brown 
Associate Editor of Literature: Miss Frances Eshelman 
Editor of The Methodist Woman: Mrs. C. A. Meeker 

Literature Headquarters, 7820 Reading Road, Cincinnati 37, Ohio 
Circulation Manager and Secretary of Literature: Mrs. C. C. Long 
Publication and Business Manager: Mrs. E. LeRoy Stiffler 

Interboard Staff Members, 1001 19th Avenue, South, Nashville 2, Tenn. 
Interboard Committee on Missionary Education 

Executive Secretary: Mr. Horace Williams 

Adult Work: Mr. Edwin Tewksbury 

Youth Work: Miss May L. Titus 

Children's Work: Miss E. Mae Young 

Summer Itineration: Miss Jennie Youngblood 
Methodist Youth Fund: Miss Emeline Crane 
Interboard Committee on Christian Vocations: Mr. Richard Belcher 



8 Woman's Division of Christian Service 

MEMBERS 
Northeastern Jurisdiction 

Bishop Frederick B. Newell 150 Fifth Avenue, New York 11, N. Y . 

Mrs. William T. Anderson 34 S. Hunter Avenue, Auburn, N. Y. 

Mrs. G. Albin Dahlquist 481 Fair Street, Providence 5, R. I. 

Mrs. L. F. Hemenwat 703 Grandview Avenue, New Castle, Pa. 

Mrs. Paul G. Masters 1483 Welsh Road, Huntingdon Valley, Pa. 

Mrs. John M. Pearson 234 North Street, Newburgh, N. Y. 

Mrs. Wallace N. Streeter 516 Van Buren St., NV. W., Washington 12, D. C. 

Members-at-Large 

President of the Jurisdiction 

Mrs. John Warren 269 Flower Avenue, W., Watertown, N. Y. 



Southeastern Jurisdiction 

Bishop Roy H. Short 810 Broadway, Nashville, Tenn. 

Mrs. Walter H. Beckham 461 S. W. Twenty-second Road, Miami, Fla. 

Mrs. C. L. Cooper 412 N. Sycamore Street, Mount Sterling, Ky. 

Mrs. C. P. Hardin 108 S. Crest Road, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Mrs. John Hotle, Jr 1505 Glenwood Avenue, Greensboro, N. C. 

Mrs. L. L. Jackson 1413 Cleburne Avenue, Birmingham, Ala. 

Mrs. J. Fount Tillman R. F. D. 1, Lewisburg, Tenn. 

Mrs. H. B. Trimble P. O. Box 725, Emory University, Ga. 

Mrs. Ralph Wilson, Sr Route 3, Laurens, S. C. 

M embers-at-Large 

President of the Jurisdiction 

Mrs. E. U. Robinson P. O. Box 516, Gallatin, Tenn. 



Central Jurisdiction 

Bishop Edgar A. Love 1206 Etting Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. E. J. Badgett 631 Baronne Street, New Orleans 12, La. 

Mrs. W. H. McCallum 2972 E. Lafayette, Detroit 9, Mich. 

Mrs. W. N. Rivers 4011 Massachusetts Avenue, S. E., Washington 20, D. C. 

Mrs. J. Ernest Wilkins 4708 Blagden Terrace, N. W., Washington 11, D. C. 

M ember s-at-Large 

President of the Jurisdiction 

Mrs. Robert K. Gordon Box 226, Dillon, S. C. 



North Central Jurisdiction 

Bishop H. Clifford Northcott 516 First National Bank Bldg., Madison 3, Wis. 

Mrs. Harold M. Baker 3433 Secor Road, Toledo 6, Ohio 

Mrs. H. F. Brandt 644 Pioneer Trail, Aurora, Ohio 

Mrs. Donald H. Gibbs 1500 W. Williams Street, Decatur, 111. 

Mrs. A. O. Gunnerud Rugby, N. D. 



Members 9 

Mrs. A. R. Henry 60S Wilson Avenue, Menomonie, Wis. 

Mrs. Alfred H. Lowther 16213 Ashton Road, Detroit 19, Mich. 

Mrs. F. L. McDaniel 3607 East Twelfth Avenue, Gary, Ind. 

Mrs. T. Otto Nall 2748 Marcy Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Members-at-Large 

President of the Jurisdiction 

Mrs. Alvin B. Pfeiffer 523 Kingsway Drive, Aurora, 111. 

South Central Jurisdiction 

Bishop Dana Dawson 810 National Bank of Topeka Bldg., Topeka, Kan. 

Mrs. C. C. Coffee 3419 Twenty-first Street, Lubbock, Texas 

Mrs. Frank Greathouse Rogers, N. M. 

Mrs. J. Russell Henderson 110 N. Cedar Street, Little Rock, Ark. 

Mrs. Glenn E. Laskey 710 N. Vienna Street, Ruston, La. 

Mrs. Charles W. Mead 5122 Davenport Street, Omaha 3, Neb. 

Mrs. Willis L. Perryman 527 N. Moffet Street, Joplin, Mo. 

Members-at-Large 

President of the Jurisdiction 

Mrs. Harold L. Soulen 204 Crescent Boulevard, Hutchinson, Kan. 

Western Jurisdiction 

Bishop Glenn R. Phillips 2100 S. Josephine, Denver 10, Colo. 

Mrs. Walter Eichinger 2281 E. Sixty-first Street, Seattle 15, Wash. 

Mrs. James P. Howell 1832 Seventeenth Avenue, San Francisco 22, Calif. 

Mrs. B. R. Lewis 15 Alta Street, Arcadia, Calif . 

Mrs. B. F. Russell 410 S. Thurmond Street, Sheridan, Wyo. 

Members-at-Large 

President of the Jurisdiction 

Mrs. Edwin A. Ingham 305 N. El Molino Street, Alhambra, Calif. 

Representatives from the Divisions of National and World Missions 

Mr. William E. Sander 1508 Seventh Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 

Mr. George R. Williams New Albany, Miss. 

Rev. Merrill C. Johnson 245 Liberty Street, Newburgh, N. Y. 

Mr. Dewey Lampkin 6135 S. Aberdeen Street, Chicago, 111. 

Youth Members 

Miss Katherine Edwards 301 E. Sixth North Street, Morristown, Term. 

Miss Patricia Lashbrook 911 Brown Avenue, Galesburg, 111. 

Chairman of the Program Area of the National MYF Commission of the National 
Conference of Methodist Youth 

Miss Ruth Rae Mountz Salem, Ohio 



10 



Standing Committees 
Executive Committee 



Mrs. J. Fount Tillman, Chairman 

R. F. D. 1, Lewisburg, Tennessee 
Bishop Edgar A. Love 
Bishop H. Clifford Northcott 
Bishop Rot H. Short 
Mrs. William T. Anderson 
Mrs. Harold M. Baker 
Mrs. H. F. Brandt 
Mrs. C. P. Hardin 
Mrs. J. Russell Henderson 
Mrs. A. R. Henry 
Mrs. James P. Howell 
Mrs. B. R. Lewis 
Mrs. W. H. McCallum 
Mrs. Paul G. Masters 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 



Mrs. T. Otto Nall 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 
Mrs. E. U. Robinson 
Mrs. Harold L. Soulen 
Mrs. Wallace N. Streeter 
Mrs. J. Ernest Wilkins. 

Ex Officio (without vote) 
Executive and other Secretaries 
Treasurers 
Disbursing Officer 
Editors 

Publication and Business Manager 
Circulation Manager and Secretary 
Literature 



of 



Administrative Committee 



Mrs. J. Fount Tillman, Chairman 

Mrs. H. F. Brandt 

Mrs. C. P. Hardin 

Mrs. A. R. Henry 

Mrs. W. H. McCallum 

Mrs. T. Otto Nall 

Mrs. John M. Pearson 



Mrs. E. U. Robinson 
Mrs. Wallace N. Streeter 
Mrs. J. Ernest Wilkins 

Ex Officio (without vote) 
Executive Secretaries 
Treasurer 



Constitution and By-laws — 

Mrs. Harold L. Soulen, Chairman 

204 Crescent Blvd., Hutchinson, Kansas 
Mrs. George W. Carter, Jr. 
Mrs. C. C. Coffee 
Mrs. G. Albin Dahlquist 
Mrs. Donald Gibbs 
Mrs. A. O. Gunnerud 
Mrs. Frank I. Hollingsworth 
Mrs. William E. Horton, Jr. 
Mrs. John Hoyle, Je. 
Mrs. L. L. Jackson 
Mr. Dewey Lampkin 
Mrs. Alfred H. Lowther 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 
Mrs. Alvin B. Pfeiffer 
Mb. William E. Sander 
Mrs. Wallace N. Streeter 



Finance and Estimates — 

Mrs. Charles W. Mead, Chairman 

5122 Davenport St., Omaha 3, Neb. 
Mrs. William T. Anderson 
Mrs. H. F. Brandt 
Mrs. C. P. Hardin 
Mrs. A. R. Henry 
Mrs. Glenn E. Laskey 
Mrs. B. R. Lewis 
Mrs. Paul G. Masters 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 
Mrs. E. U. Robinson 
Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 
Mrs. H. B. Trimble 

Ex Officio: 

Secretaries 

Treasurers 

Disbursing Officer 

Editors 

Publication and Business Manager 

Circulation Manager and Secretary of 

Literature 
Secretaries and Editor of the Section of 
Education and Cultivation 



Library Service — 



Mrs. W. H. McCallum, Chairman 

2972 E. Lafayette St., Detroit 7, Mich. 
Mrs. Donald Gibbs 
Mrs. John Hoyle, Jr. 
Mrs. F. Roderick. Dail 
Miss Muriel Day 

Ex Officio: 
Editor for the Committee 



Literature and Publications — 

Mrs. James P. Howell, Chairman 

1832 17th Ave., San Francisco 22, Calif. 
Mrs. E. J. Badgett 
Mrs. G. Albin Dahlquist 
Mrs. Glenn E. Laskey 
Mrs. F. L. McDaniel 
Mrs. T. Otto Nall 
Mrs. Ralph Wilson, Sr. 

Ex Officio: 

Editors 

Circulation Manager and Secretary of 
Literature 

Publication and Business Manager 

Chairman and Secretaries of the Section 
of Education and Cultivation 

Chairman of the Department of Work in 
Foreign Fields, one executive secretary 
appointed by the department. 

Chairman of the Department of Work in 

Home Fields, one executive secretary 
appointed by the department. 

Chairman of the Department of Christian 
Social Relations, the executive secretary 
of the department 

President of the Woman's Division 

Treasurer of the Woman's Division 

Chairman of the Standing Committee on 
Spiritual Life 

Vice-Chairman of the Standing Commit- 
tee on Wesleyan Service Guild 

A Secretary of the Committee on Mis- 
sionary Personnel 



Standing Committees 



11 



Missionary Personnel — 

Mrs. William T. Anderson, Chairman 
34 S. Hunter Ave., Auburn, New York 

Mrs. C. L. Cooper 

Mrs. Robert K. Gordon 

Mrs. C. P. Hardin 

Mrs. Paul G. Masters 

Mrs. T. Otto Nall 

Mbs. John M. Pearson 

Mrs. Willis L. Perryman 

Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 

Miss Alpharbtta Leepeb 

Miss J. Marguerite Twinem 

Jurisdiction Secretaries of Missionary 
Personnel 

Ex Officio: 

Executive Secretaries of Foreign and 

Home Fields 
Secretaries of Youth Work, Student Work, 

Wesleyan Service Guild 
Editor for the Committee 

Nominations — 

Mrs. Wallace N. Streeter, Chairman 
516 Van Buren Street, N. W. 
Washington 12, D. C. 

Mrs. Harold M. Baker 

Mrs. James P. Howell 

Mrs. Paul G. Masters 

Mrs. W. H. McCallum 

Mrs. Charles W. Mead 

Mrs. T. Otto Nall 

Mrs. E. U. Robinson 

Mrs. H. B. Trimble 



Pensions — 

Mrs. Paul G. Masters, Chairman 

1483 Welsh Rd., Huntingdon Valley, Pa. 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 
Miss Mart Lou Barnwell 
Miss Hazel M. Best 
Miss Margaret Billingslet 
Miss Marguerite Harris 
Miss Marguerite Hawkins 
Mrs. Alice C. Williams 



Permanent Funds and Invest- 
ments — 

Mrs. William T. Anderson 
Mrs. Glenn E. Laskey 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 
Mrs. J. Ernest Wilkins 
Miss Marguerite Harris 
Coopted Members: 
Mr. Coleman Burke 
Mr. Robert Diefendorf 
Mrs. Harry James 
Mr. Ellis L. Phillips, Jr. 
Mrs. Millard L. Robinson 

Policy — 

Mrb. J. Fount Tillman, Chairman 

R. F. D. 1, Lewisburg, Term. 
Mrs. H. F. Brandt 
Mrs. C. P. Hardin 
Mrs. J. Russell Henderson 
Mrs. A. R. Henry 
Mrs. James P. Howell 
Mrs. W. H. McCallum 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 
Mrs. T. Otto Nall 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 
Mrs. E. U. Robinson 
Mrs. J. Ernest Wilkins 
Miss Marguerite Harris 
Miss Clara M. French 
Miss Dorothy McConnell 



Salaries — 

Mrs. H. B. Trimble, Chairman 

Box 725, Emory University, Ga. 
Mrs. H. F. Brandt 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 
Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 

Spiritual Life — 

Mrs. E. U. Robinson, Chairman 

Box 516, Gallatin, Tenn. 
Mrs. Walter H. Beckham 
Mrs. Robert K. Gordon 
Mrs. Frank Gbeathousb 
Mrs. Alfred H. Lowther 
Mrs. B. F. Russell 
Mrs. John Warren 
Chairman of the Committee on Spiritual 

Life of the standing Committee of the 

Wesleyan Service Guild. 
Jurisdiction Secretaries of Spiritual Life 
Ex Officio: 
Editor for the Committee 

Status of Women — 

Mrs. J. Russell Henderson, Chairman 
110 North Cedar, Little Rock, Arkansas 

Mrs. George W. Carter, Jr. 

Mrs. A. O. Gunnerdd 

Mrs. L. F. Hemenway 

Mrs. William E. Horton, Jr. 

Mrs. L. L. Jackson 

Mrs. T. Otto Nall 

Mrs. B. F. Russell 

Mrs. F. Roderick Dail 

Miss Dorcas Hall 

Miss Lillian Johnson 

Miss Alpharetta Leeper 

Miss Dorothy McConnell 

Miss Thelma Stevens 

Chairman of Committee on Status of 
Women of Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Jurisdiction Secretaries of Status of 
Women 

Supply Work — 

Mrs. B. R. Lewis, Cliairman 
15 Alta St., Arcadia, California 

Mrs. William T. Anderson 

Mrs. Charles W. Mead 

Chairman of the Committee on Supply 
Work of the standing Committee of 
Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Jurisdiction Secretaries of Supply Work 
Ex Officio: 

Editor for the Committee 

Wesleyan Service Guild — 

Mrs. Harold M. Baker, Chairman 
3433 Secor Road, Toledo 6, Ohio 

Mrs. E. J. Badgett 

Mrs. L. F. Hemenway 

Mrs. John Hoyle, Jr. 

Mrs. Glenn E. Laskey 

Mrs. B. F. Russell 

Jurisdiction Secretaries of Wesleyan Serv- 
ice Guild 

Six Guild Members-at-Large 

Secretary of Wesleyan Service Guild 
Ex Officio: 

Treasurer of Woman '■ Division 

Executive Secretary of the Section of 
Education and Cultivation 

Editor for the Committee 

World Federation of Methodist 
Women — 

Mrs. T. Otto Nall, Chairman 
2748 Marcy Ave., Evanston, 111. 
Mrs. E. J. Badgett 



12 



Mrs. Walter H. Beckham 
Mas. C. C. Coffeb 
Mrs. Donald Gibes 
Mrs. Frank Greathousb 
Mrs. C. P. Hardin 
Mrs. J. Russell Henderson 
Mrs. A. R. Henry 
Mbs. John Hoyle, Jr. 
Mrs. Edwin A. Ingham 
Mrs. F. L. McDaniel 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 
Mrs. Alvtn B. Pfeipfer 
Mrs. W. N. Rivers 
Mrs. Harold L. Soulen 



Mrs. Wallace N. Streeteb 
Mrs. H. B. Trimble 
Miss Mary Lou Barnwell 
Mrs. C. A. Bender 
Miss Juanita Brown 
Miss Frances Eshelman 
Miss Clara M. French 
Miss Lillian Johnson 
Miss Dorothy McConnell 
Mrs. C. A. Meeker 
Miss Dorothy Nyland 
Miss Ruby Van Hooseb 
Jurisdiction Vice-Presidents 



Special Committees 



Annual Meeting — 

Mrs. J. Fount Tillman, Chairman 

R.F.D. 1, Lewisburg, Tenn. 
Mrs. T. Otto Nall 
Mrs. J. Ernest Wilkins 
Consulting Members: 
Mrs. H. F. Brandt 
Mrs. C. P. Hardin 
Mrs. A. R. Henry 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 

Annual Report — 

Mrs. J. Ernest Wilkins, Chairman 
4708 Blagden Terrace, N. W. Washing- 
ton 11, D. C. 

Mrs. H. F. Brandt 



Mrs. C. P. Hardin 
Mrs. A. R. Henry 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 
Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 
Miss Dorcas Hall 
Mrs. C. C. Long 
Mrs. C. A. Meeker 
Mrs. E. LsRoy Stiffler 

Week of Prayer and Self-Denial- 

Mbs. Walter H. Beckham, Chairman 
461 S. W. 22nd Road, Miami, Fla. 
Mrs. Edwin A. Ingham 
Mrs. Alfred H. Lowther 
Mrs. John W. Warren 
Miss Frances Eshelman 



Departments 

Department of Work in Foreign Fields — 



Mrs. John M. Pearson, Chairman 

Mrs. William T. Anderson, Secretary 

Mrs. E. J. Badgett 

Mrs. Harold M. Bakeb 

Mrs. C. L. Cooper 

Miss Katherine Edwards 

Mrs. A. O. Gunnerud 

Mrs. W. E. Horton 

Mrs. James P. Howell 

Mrs. L. L. Jackson 

Mrs. Glenn E. Laskey 

Mrs. B. R. Lewis 

Mrs. A. H. Lowther 

Mrs. W. H. McCallum 

Bishop Frederick B. Newell 

Bishop Roy H. Short 

Mrs. John W. Warren 

Rev. George Williams 

Executive Secretaries 

Ex Officio: 
President of the Woman's Division 
Treasurer of the Woman's Division 
Assistant Treasurer for Foreign Fields 
Secretary of Missionary Personnel 

Executive Committee 

Mrs. John M. Pearson, Chairman 
Mrs. William T. Anderson, Secretary 
Mrs. Harold M. Baker 
Mrs. James P. Howell 
Mrs. B. R. Lewis 
Mrs. W. H. McCallum 
Bishop Roy H. Short 
Executive Secretaries 

Administrative Committee 

Mrs. John M. Pearson, Chairman 
Mrs. William T. Anderson, Secretary 
Mrs. Harold M. Bakes 
Mrs. James P. Howell 



Mrs. B. R. Lewis 
Mrs. W. H. McCallum 

Standing Committee 

Mrs. John M. Pearson, Chairman 

Mrs. Harold M. Baker 

Mrs. L. L. Jackson 

Mrs. John W. Warren 

Jurisdiction Secretaries of Missionary 

Service in Foreign Fields 
Executive Secretaries 

Ex Officio: 
Executive Secretary, Section of Education 

and Cultivation 
Secretary of Missionary Education 

Interdivision Committee 
Miss Hazel M. Bmt 
Mrs. F. Romkcx Dail 
Miss Makguebit* Harris 
Executive Secretaries 

Committee on Finance and Estimate* 
Mrs. John M. Pearson, Chairman 
Mrs. William T. Anderson 
Mbs. Glenn E. Laskey 
Mrs. B. R. Lewis 
Executive Secretaries 

Literatnre Committee 

Mrs. E. J. Badgett 
Mrs. A. O. Gunnerud 
Mrs. W. E. Horton 
Mrs. James P. Howell 
Mrs. Glenn E. Laskey 
Mrs. A. H. Lowther 
Miss Margaret Billingsley 

Ex Officio: 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 



Department Committees 



13 



Committee on Missionary Personnel 
Mbs. Wiujam T. Anderson, Chairman 
Mrs. C. L. Cooper 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 
Miss J. Marguerite Twinem 
Executive Secretaries 

Nominating Committee 

Mrs. Harold M. Baker, Chairman 
Mrs. James P. Howell 
Mrs. W. H. McCallum 

Country Committee! 

Africa and Europe: 
Mrs. William T. Anderson 
Mrs. E. J. Badgett 
Mrs. L. L. Jackson 
Mrs. Rot Young 
Miss Ruth Lawrence 

India and Pakistan: 
Mrs. Harold M. Baker 
Miss Katheeine Edwards 
Mrs. B. R. Lewis 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 
Mrs. Clyde LeMessurier 
Miss Lucilb Colony 

Japan and Korea: 
Mrs. A. O. Gunnerud 
Mrs. W. E. Horton 
Mrs. Alfred H. Lowther 
Bishop Frederick B. Newell 
Mrs. E. M. Tilton 
Miss Margaret Billingsley 

Latin America: 
Mrs. C. L. Cooper 
Mrs. James P. Howell 
Bishop Roy H. Short 
Mrs. E. A. Farmer 
Rev. George Williams 
Miss Marian Derby 

Southeast Asia and China: 
Mrs. Robert K. Gordon 
Mrs. W. H. McCallum 
Mrs. Glenn E. Lasket 
Mrs. John W. Warren 
Mrs. E. V. Perry 
Miss Clara M. French 

Representatives on Cooperating 
Committees and Boards — 

National Council of the Churches of Christ 
in the United States of America, Divi- 
sion of Foreign Missions Committees 

Africa: 

Miss Ruth Lawrence 
China: 

Miss Clara M. French 
Europe: 

Miss Ruth Lawrence 

Southern Asia: 
Miss Lucile Colony 

Japan: 
Miss Margaret Billingsley 

Korea: 

Miss Margaret Billingsley 

Near East: 
Miss Ruth Lawrence 

Latin America: 
Miss Marian Derby 

Philippines : 
Miss Clara M. French 



Southeast Asia: 

Miss Clara M. French 
Associated Medical Mission Office: 

Mies Lucile Colony 

Christian Medical Council for Overseas 
Work: 
Miss Lucile Colony 

Radio, Visual Education and Mass Com- 
munication: 
Miss Marian Derby 
Miss Ruth Lawrence 

Rural Missions Cooperating Committee: 
Miss Lucile Colony 

Committee on World Literacy and Chris- 
tian Literature: 
Miss Jdanita Brown 
Miss Clara M. French 
Mrs. F. Roderick Dail 
Miss Dorothy McConneu. 

Treasurers' Group: 

Miss Marguerite Harris 
World Council Christian Education: 
Miss Margaret Billingsley 
Mrs. Floyd Shacklock (Alternate) 

United Board for Christian Colleges in Asia 

Mrs. Gerald Alcorn 
Mrs. J. D. Bragg 
Mrs. Frank G. Brooks 
Miss Rosa May Butlbb 
Miss Elizabeth Congdon 
Mrs. R. E. Diffendortob 
Miss Margaret Forsyth 
Miss Clara M. French 
Miss Henrietta Gibson 
Miss Florencb Hooper 
Mm. Lynn Harol* Hough 
Mrs. Harriet Lacy 
Mrs. Alan E. Laing 
Miss Sallib Lou MacKinnon 
Mrs. J. W. Masland 
Miss Dorothy McConnbll 
Mrs. 8. E. McCreless 
Mrs. Ellis L. Phillips 
Miss Louise Robinson 
Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 
Miss J. Marguerite Twinem 
Mrs. Charles E. Wegnbr 
Mrs. J. Ernest Wilkins 
Miss Louise Young 

Woman's Union Christian Medical College, 
Shanghai 

Miss Henrietta Gibson 
Mrs. E. L. Hillman 
Miss Clara M. French 

Isabella Thobnrn College, Lncknow 

Miss Lucile Colony 

Mrs. Charles H. Hardib 

Miss Florence Hoopbb 

Mi. James K. Mathews 

Dr. Roland Scott 

Mrs. H. E. Woolbtrb 

Mrs. John M. Pearson (Advisory) 

Mrs. Ellis L. Phillips (Advisory) 

Mbs. Fred A. Victor (Alternate) 

Miss Dorcas Hall (Co-opted) 

Lndhiana Christian Medical College 

Miss Lucilb Colony 

Mrs. John M. Pearson (Alternate) 

Council of Christian Edncation in Asia 

Miss Lucilb Colony 
Miss Clara M. French 



14 



St. Christopher's Training College 

Miss Lucius Colony 

Mbs. John M. Pearson 

Miss Dorothy McConnell (Alternate) 

Cooperating Board for Christian Education 
in Chosen 

Mrs. Frank G. Brooks 
Miss Margaret Billingslet 

Woman's Christian College of Madras 

Miss Lucilb Colony 
Mbs. John W. Lord 
Miss Dorothy McConnell (Alternate) 

Missionary Medical College for Women, 
VeUore 

Miss Lucius Colony 

Mbs. Ellis L. Phillips 

Mbs. John M. Pearson (Alternate) 

Vellore Christian Medical College 
Miss Lucius Colony 
Mbs. John M. Pearson 
Mbs. Ellis L. Phillips 

Kinnalrd Christian College 

Miss Lucius Colony 
Mbs. John M. Peabson 
Mbs. Ellis L. Phillips 

Tokyo Woman's Christian College 

Miss Margaret Billingslet 

Mbs. C. A. Meeker 

Mbs. Charles E. Wbgnbb 

Mbs. William T. Anderson (Alternate) 



Christian Literature for Women and Chil- 
dren in Mission Fields 

Miss Marian Dbrbt 
Mrs. F. Roderick Dail 

Christian Literature for Africa, American 
Section 

Miss Ruth Lawrence 

Willis Pierce Memorial Hospital, China 

Miss Hazel M. Best 
Miss Clara M. French 
Mrs. Lynn Harold Hough 

Ewha College, Korea 

Mrs. Frank E. Bakeb 
Mibs Margaret Billingslet 
Mrs. Frank G. Brooks 
Mrs. Earl Cunningham 
Miss Margaret Forsyth 
Miss Henrietta Gibson 
Mrs. E. L. Hilluan 
Mrs. J. Wesley Masland 
Mrs. Velma Maynor 
Mrs. S. E. McCreless 
Mrs. Charles E. Wegneb 

Japan Christian University Foundation 

Miss Margaret Billingslet 

Miss Elizabeth M. Lee 

Miss Sallib Lou MacKinnon (Alternate) 

Mrs. W. N. Rivers 

Interboard Committee for Christian Work 
in Japan 

Miss Margaret Billingslet 

American Leprosy Missions 

Mrs. Frank G. Bell 



Department of Work in Home Fields — 



Mrs. C. P. Hardin, Chairman 
Mrs. W. L. Perryman, Secretary 
Mrs. Walter H. Beckham 
Mrs. H. F. Brandt 
Mrs. C. C. Coffee 
Mrs. George W. Carter, Jr. 
Mrs. Donald H. Gibbs 
Mrs. Robert K. Gordon 
Mrs. L. F. Hemenway 
Mrs. John Hoyle, Jr. 
Mr. Dewey Lampkin 
Mbs. F. L. McDaniel 
Mrs. Paul G. Masters 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 
Miss Ruth Rab Mountz 
Bishop H. Clifford Northcott 
Bishop Glenn R. Phillips 
Mrs. E. U. Robinson 
Mrs. B. F. Russell 
Executive Secretaries 

Ex Officio: 
President of the Woman's Division 
Treasurer of the Woman's Division 
Assistant Treasurer for Home Fields 
Secretary of Missionary Personnel 

Executive Committee 

Mrs. C. P. Hardin, Chairman 
Mrs. H. F. Brandt 
Mrs. Paul G. Masters 
Mbs. Charles W. Mead 
Bishop H. Clifford Northcott 
Mrs. E. U. Robinson 
Executive Secretaries 

Administrative Committee 

Mrs. C. P. Hardin, Chairman 
Mrs. W. L. Perryman, Secretary 
Mrs. H. F. Brandt 



Mrs. Paul G. Masters 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 
Mrs. E. U. Robinson 
Executive Secretaries 
Assistant Treasurer 

Finance and Estimates Committee 

Mrs. C. P. Hardin, Chairman 
Mrs. W. L. Perryman, Secretary 
Mrs. H. F. Brandt 
Mrs. Paul G. Masters 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 
Mrs. E. U. Robinson 
Executive Secretaries 
Assistant Treasurer 

Standing Committee 

Mrs. C. P. Hardin, Chairman 

Mrs. L. F. Hemenway 

Mrs. Edwin A. Ingham 

Jurisdiction Secretaries of Missionary 

Service in Home Fields 
Executive Secretaries 
Assistant Secretary 

Ex Officio: 
Executive Secretary, Section of Education 

and Cultivation 
Secretary of Missionary Education 

Interdivision Committee on Work in H«n»e 
Fields 

Miss Mary Lou Barnwell 
Miss Emma Burris 
Miss Muriel Day 
Miss Marguerite Harris 
Miss Marguerite Hawkins 
Miss Alpharetta Leepeb 
Miss L. Cornelia Russell 
Mrs. Mabel G. Wagner 



Department Committees 



15 



Building Committee 

Mas. Charles W. Mead, Chairman 
Mrs. H. F. Brandt 
Mrs. F. L. McDaniel 



Constitution and By-laws 

Mrs. John Hoyle, Jr. Chairman 
Mrs. C. C. Coffee 
Mrs. Geo. W. Carter, Jr. 
Mrs. Donald Gibbs 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 



Insurance Committee 

Mrs. Robert K. Gordon, Chairman 
Mrs. Walter H. Beckham 
Miss Emma Burbis 
Miss Marguerite Hawkins 



Committee on New Work 

Mas. W. L. Pbrryman, Chairman 
Mrs. Walter H. Beckham 
Mrs. Paul G. Masters 
Mrs. E. U. Robinson 
Mrs. B. F. Russell 



Committee on Nominations 
Mrs. H. F. Brandt, Chairman 
Mrs. Paul G. Masters 
Mrs. E. U. Robinson 



Committee on Week of Prayer Projects 

Mrs. Walter H. Beckham, Chairman 
Mrs. George W. Carter, Jr. 
Mrs. L. F. Hemenwat 
Mrs. Edwin A. Ingham 



Advisory Committees 

Commission on Deaconess Work: 
Miss Mary Lou Barnwell, Executive 

Secretary 
Mrs. E. U. Robinson, Chairman 
Mrs. H. F. Brandt 
Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 
Presidents, Jurisdiction Woman's Societies 
of Christian Service 

Educational Institutions: 
Miss Muriel Day, Executive Secretary 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead, Chairman 
Mrs. John Hoyle, Jr. 
Mrs. L. F. Hemenway 
Mrs. F. L. McDaniel 
Mrs. W. N. Rivers 

Social Welfare and Medical Work: 
Miss Emma Burris, Executive Secretary 
Mrs. C. C. Coffee, Chairman 
Mrs. Donald H. Gibbs 
Mrs. Robert K. Gordon 
Miss Charlotte Andress 
Miss Irene Linder 

Medical Work: 
Mrs. Walter H. Beckham, Chairman 
Mrs. Edwin A. Ingham 
Mrs. H. B. Trimble 
Mrs. J. Ernest Wilkins 
Mrs. Frank G. Brooks 
Miss Ada Fort 

Town and Country Work: 
Miss L. Cornelia Russell, 

Executive Secretary 
Mas. W. L. Pwuvtman, Chairman 



Mrs. B. F. Russell 
Mrs. E. U. Robinson 
Mrs. A. R. Henry 
Mrs. W. H. Carr 
Mrs. C. A. Baer 
Miss Louise Youno 

Urban Work: 
Mrs. Mabel Garrett Wagner, 

Executive Secretary 
Mrs. H. F. Brandt, Chairman 
Mrs. Paul G. Masters 
Miss Grace Arnold 
Miss Mona Kewish 
Miss Arlkne Merritt 
Mrs. Clotildb F. Nanez 
Miss Margaret Young 

Elizabeth Ritter Hall, Athens, Tenn. 
Mrs. C. P. Hardin 

President and Secretary of Supply Work, 
Holston Conference Woman's Society 

Holding Institute, Laredo, Texas 
Mrs. C. A. Barb 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 

President, South Central Jurisdiction, if a 
resident of Texas 

Conference Presidents: 
Central Texas Conference 
Southwest Texas Conference 
Texas Conference 
Rio Grande Conference 

Local Presidents: 
First Methodist Church, Laredo, Tex. 
La Trinidad Methodist Church, Laredo, 
Tex. 

Local Ministers : 
Firat Methodist Church, Laredo, Tex. 
La Trinidad Methodist Church, Laredo, 
Tex. 

District Superintendents: 

McAllen District, Southwest Texas Con- 
ference 

Southern District, Rio Grande Confer- 
ference 

Member-at-large : 
Mrs. Clotilde F. Nanez 

Wood Junior College, Mathiston, Miss. 

Miss Muriel Day, Executive Secretary 

Mas. W. H. Ratliff 

Mrs. D. H. Hall 

Mrs. E. M. Sharp 

Mrs. C. P. Hardin, ex officio 

California Properites of the Woman's Di- 
vision, Incorporated 
Class of 1958: Mrs. Edwin A. Ingham 
Class of 1959: Mrs. James P. Howell 
Class of 1960: Mas. Charles W. Mead 

Medical Mission Dispensary, Boston, Mass. 
Mrs. Emil Hartel 
Mrs. Henry Webster 
Miss Emma Burris, ex officio 
Mrs. C. P. Hardin, ex officio 



Representatives on Boards of Trustees 
Bennett College, Greensboro, N. C. 

Term expires 1968: 
Mrs. Robert K. Gordon 
Mrs. C. P. Hardin 
Mrs. J. N. Rodihiavbi 



16 



Term expires 1969: 

Mm. Frank G. Brooks 
Mu. W. Ratuond Beown 
Mes. J. Ernest Wilkins 

Term expires 1960: 
Mrs. H. C. Black 
Mbs. W. H. C. Goods 
Mbs. M. L. Robinson 
Miss Muriel Day, Advisory 



Clark College, Atlanta, Oa. 
Term expires 1968: 
Mbs. J. N. Rodeheayer 

Term expires 1969: 
Miss Mubiel Day, ex officio 

Term expires 1960: 
Mas. L. M. Awtrey 

Ethel Harpst Home, Cedartown, Ga. 
Mbs. C. P. Habdin, ex officio 
Miss Emma Bubbis, ex officio 

Term expires 1968: 
Mas. L. M. Awtbey 
Mbs. R. F. Spangbb 

Term expires 1969: 
Mb. Mason Florence 

Term expires 1960: 
Mbs. W. H. C. Goods 



National College for Christian Workers, Kansas 
City, Mo. 
Mrs. J. Fount Tillman, ex officio 
Mbs. C. P. Habdin, ex officio 
Miss Maby Lou Babnwell, ex officio 
Miss Mubiel Day, ex officio 

Term expires 1968: 

Mas. H. F. Brandt 
Mbs. J. N. Rodeheatsb 
Mm. H. C. Vaughn 

Term expire* 1969: 

Mu. W. L. Pbbryuan 
Mm. Chawjw W. Mead 
Mm. Joa T. Rooms 

Term expires 1960: 

Mbs. W. H. C. Goods 
Mbs. F. F. Lewis 
Miss Marguerite Harris 



Paine College, Augusta, Oa. 

Mbs. E. L. Hillman 

Mrs. C. P. Hardin 

Miss Mubiel Day, ex officio 

Pfeiffer College, Misenheimer, N. C. 

Mbs. C. P. Habdin, ex officio 
Mibs Mubtel Day, ex officio 

Term expire* 1968: 
Mm. T. Otto Nall 

Term expire* 1969: 
Mbs. M. L. Robinson 



Term expires 1960: 
Mbs. W. H. C. Goode 

Rust College, Holly Springs, Miss. 

Term expires 1968: 
Mas. L. M. Awtbey 

Term expires 1969: 
President, Upper Mississippi Conference 
Woman's Society 

Term expires 1960: 
Mrs. Paul Abbington 

Huston-TiUotson College, Austin, Texas 

Mbs. C. A. Babb 
Mbs. O. B. Coe 
Miss Muriel Day 

Sibley Memorial Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. J. Elmeb Morgan 
Mbs. C. P. Habdin, ex officio 
Miss Emma Bubbis, ex officio 



Representatives on Cooperating 
Boards and Committees — 

National Council of tho Churches of Christ 
in the U. S. A., Dtrision of Home 
Missions 

Executive Committee: 

Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 
Mas. C. P. Habdin 

Alaska Committee: 
Mas. C. P. Hardin 
Mrs. J. N. Rodeheaveb 
Miss Emma Bubbis 

Christian Approach to the Jew*: 
Mas. C. A. Bendeb 

Home Missions Institutions: 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 
Miss Emma Bubbis 
Miss Mubiel Day 

Indian Work: 
Miss Mubiel Day 
Miss L. Cornelia Russell 

Migrant Work: 
Mas. Chables W. Mead 
Mbs. Mabel G. Wagner 
Mas. Ruth Timmons Wedqewobth 

Missionary Personnel: 
Miss Alphabetta Leepm 

Promotion and Publicity 
Miss Dorcas Hall 
Miss Dobothy McConnell 
Mrs. C. A. Meeker 

Spanish- Americans 

Mas. C. A. Bam 

Mrs. Clotildb F. Nanbi 

Miss Mubiel Dat 



Department Committees 



17 



Town and Country Church: 
Mrs. W. H. Cabb 
Mrs. Virgil Mosbib 
Miss L. Cornelia Russell 

Urban Work: 
Mrs. Paul G. Masters 
Mrs. Mabel G. Wagner 

West Indies: 
Mrs. Frederick B. Newell 
Miss Muriel Day 



Division of Christian Life and Work 

Department of Social Welfare: 
Miss Emma Burris 
Miss L. Cornelia Russell 
Miss Thelma Stevens 
Mrs. Mabel G. Wagner 

Board for Christian Work in Santo Domingo 

Mrs. Frederick B. Newell 
Miss Muriel Day 



Department of Christian Social Relations 



Mrs. A. R. Henry, Chairman 
Mrs. G. Albin Dahlquist 
Bishop Dana Dawson 
Mrs. Walter A. Eichinger 
Mrs. Frank Greathousb 
Mrs. J. Russell Henderson 
Mrs. Frank I. Hollingsworth 
Ret. Merrill C. Johnson 
Miss Patricia Lashbrook 
Bishop Edgar A. Lova 
Mrs. T. Otto Nall 
Mrs. Alyin B. Pfeiffer 
Mrs. W. N. Rivers 
Mr. William E. Sander 
Mrs. Wallacb N. Streeter 
Mrs. Harold L. Soulen 
Mrs. H. B. Trimble 
Mrs. J. Ernest Wilkins 
Mrs. Ralph T. Wilson, Sr. 
Executive and Associate Secretaries of 
department 

Standing Committee 

Mrs. A. R. Henry, Chairman 

Mrs. J. Russell Henderson 

Mrs. Ralph T. Wilson, Sr. 

Mrs. Wallace N. Streeter, Secretary 

Jurisdiction Secretaries of Christian Social 

Relations 
Chairman, Christian Social Relations of 

standing Committee of the Wesleyan 

service Guild. 
Executive and Associate Secretaries of 

department 

Executive Committee 

Mrs. A. R. Henry, Chairman 
Mrs. J. Russel Henderson 



Mrs. T. Otto Nall 
Mrs. Harold L. Soulen 
Mrs. Wallace N. Streeter 
Mrs. J. Ernest Wilkins 
Executive and Associate Secretaries 
department 



Finance Committee 

Mrs. A. R. Henry 
Mrs. H. B. Trimble 
Mrs. J. Ernest Wilkins 
Executive and Associate Secretaries 
department 

t Committee on Techniques for Action 

Mrs. J. Russell Henderson, Chairman 

Bishop Dana Dawson 

Rev. Merrill C. Johnson 

Mrs. T. Otto Nall 

Mrs. Alvin B. Pfeiffer 

Mrs. W. N. Rivers 

Mrs. Harold L. Soulen 

Mrs. Wallace N. Streeter 

Mrs. J. Ernest Wilkins 



fCommittee on Quadrennial Emphases 

Mrs. Ralph T. Wilson, Sr., Chairman 

Mrs. G. Albin Dahlquist 

Mrs. Walter A. Eichinger 

Mrs. Frank Greathouse 

Mrs. Frank I. Hollingsworth 

Miss Patricia Lashbrook 

Bishop Edgar A. Love 

Mr. William E. Sander 

Mrs. H. B. Trimble 



of 



*The president and vice-presidents of the Division, other than the chairman of this department, 
shall be members ex officio. 

The secretaries of the Section of Education and Cultivation, the editors, the executive secretaries 
of the administrative departments, the chairman of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service 
Guild, may be members and serve as consultants for committees. 

Liaison Representatives from the Board of Temperance, Board of World Peace, and Board of Social 
and Economic Relations serve as resource persons for the department. 

tThe president of the Division and the chairman and secretaries of the department shall be members 
ex officio. 



Section of Education and Cultivation — 



Mrs. Harvey F. Brandt, Chairman 
Mrs. Harold M. Baker 
Mrs. Walter A. Eichinger 
Mrs. C. P. Hardin 
Mrs. W. H. McCallum 
Mrs. Charles W. Mbad 



Mrs. T. Otto Nall 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 
Mrs. W. N. Rivers 
Mbs. Harold L. Soulen 
Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 
Mrs. John W. Warren 



18 



Executive Secretary and Assistant to 
Executive Secretary 

Secretary of Missionary Education and 
Assistant to Secretary of Missionary 
Education 

Associate Secretaries of the Section and 
Field Workers 

Secretary of Wesleyan Service Guild 

Editors, Publication and Business Man- 
ager, Circulation Manager and Secre- 
tary of Literature 

Ex Officio: 
Treasurer of the Woman's Division 
Chairman of Committee on Spiritual Life 
Chairman of Committee on Literature and 

Publications 
Chairman of Committee on Status of 

Women 
Chairman of Committee on Supply Work 
Three Executive Secretaries from Depart- 
ment of Work in Foreign Fields 
Three Executive Secretaries from Depart- 
ment of Work in Home Fields 
Executive and Associate Secretaries from 
Department of Christian Social Rela- 
tions 

Coopted: 
Jurisdiction Presidents 



Executive Committee 

Mrs. Habvey F. Brandt, Chairman 

Mrs. Harold M. Baker 

Mrs. C. P. Hardin 

Mrs. W. H. McCallum 

Mrs. Charles W. Mead 

Mrs. T. Otto Nall 

Mrs. John M. Pearson 

Mrs. Harold L. Soulen 

Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 

Ex Officio members 

Staff who are members of Section 



Standing Committee on Organization and 
Promotion 

Mrs. W. H. McCallum Chairman 

Mrs. Harvey F. Brandt 

Mrs. Walter A. Eichinger 

Mrs. J. Russell Henderson 

Mrs. T. Otto Nall 

Mrs. E. TJ. Robinson 

Mrs. Harold L. Soulan 

Mrs. John W. Warren 

Jurisdiction Secretaries of Promotion 

Executive Secretary of the Section 

Assistant to Executive Secretary 

Secretary of Visual Education 

Secretary of Field Cultivation 

Field Workers 

Secretary of Promotion of the standing 

Committee of the Wesleyan Service 

Guild 

Ex Officio: 
Editor for the Committee 



Standing Committee on Missionary Edu- 
cation 

Mrs. James P. Howell, Chairman 

Mrs. Harold M. Baker 

Mrs. C. P. Hardin 

Mrs. B. R. Lewis 

Mrs. Charles W. Mead 

Mrs. John M. Pearson 

Mrs. W. N. Rivers 

Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 

Jurisdiction Secretaries of Missionary 

Education 
One Jurisdiction Secretary of Missionary 

Service for Foreign Work 



One Jurisdiction Secretary of Missionary 
Service tor Home Work 

Secretary of Missionary Education 

Assistant to Secretary of Missionary Edu- 
cation 

Chairman of Missionary Education of 
standing Committee of Wesleyan Serv- 
ice Guild 

Ex Officio: 
Chairman of Section 
Editor for Committee 



Standing Committee on Student Work 

Mrs. Waltei A. Eichinger 

Mrs. T. Otto Nall 

Mrs. W. N. Rivers 

Jurisdiction Secretaries of Student Work 

Secretary of Student Work 



Ex Officio: 
Editor for the Committee 



Standing Committee on Missionary Educa- 
tion of Youth 

Mrs. Harold M. Baker 

Mrs. C. P. Hardin 

Mrs. Harold L. Soulen 

Jurisdiction Secretaries of Youth Work 

Youth Work Member of Staff of Joint 

Department of Missionary Education 
Methodist Youth Fund Promotion Staff 

Member of Youth Department 
Secretary of Youth Work 

Ex Officio: 
Chairman of Section 
Editor for the Committee 



Standing Committee on Missionary Edu- 
cation of Children 

Mrs. W. H. McCallum 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 
Mrs. John W. Warren 
Jurisdiction Secretaries of Children's 

Work 
Children's Work Member of Staff of Joint 

Department of Missionary Education 
Secretary of Children's Work 

Ex Officio: 
Chairman of Section 
Editor for the Committee 



Committee on Financial Promotion 

Mrs. Harvey F. Brandt 
Mrs. C. P. Hardin 
Mrs. A. R. Henry 
Mrs. B. R. Lewis 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 
Mrs. T. Otto Nall 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 
Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 
Miss Dorcas Hall 
Miss Marguerite Harris 
Mrs. C. A. Meeker 



Advisory Committee on Audio- Visuals 

Mrs. Harvey F. Brandt 
Mrs. J. Russell Henderson 
Mrs. W. H. McCallum 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 
Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 
Miss Dorcas Hall 
Mrs. Maudb W. Hardie 
Miss Marguerite Harris 
Miss Elisabeth Mttcamn 



Cooperative Committees and Commissions 



19 



Representatives on Cooperative 

Commission on Deaconess Work — 

Mrs. Harvey F. Brandt 
Mrs. E. U. Robinson 
Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 
President of each Jurisdiction Woman's 
Society of Christian Service 

Commission on Promotion and Culti- 
vation — 

Mrs. J. Fount Ttllman 
Mrs. E. LeRoy Stiffleb 

Commission on Structure of Meth- 
odism Overseas — 

Miss Margaret Billingsley 
Miss Lucile Colony 

Committee on Cooperation and Coun- 
sel with Board of Education— 

Mrs. C. P. Hardin 
Mrs. Charlis W. Mead 
Mrs. W. N. Rivers 
Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 
Miss Mubkl Day 
Miss Dorothy Nyland 

Council of Secretaries — 

Miss Margaret Billingsley 
Miss Dorcas Hall 
Miss Marguerite Harris 

Crusade Scholarship Committee- 
Miss Marian Derby 
Miss Clara M. French 

Family Life Commission — 

Miss Thelma Stevens 

Interboard Committee for Ministry 
to Neglected Areas and Un- 
churched Peoples — 

Mrs. Harvey F. Brandt 
Mrs. C. P. Hardin 
Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 



Committees and Commissions 

Joint Commission on Cooperation and 
Counsel with the C.M.E. Church— 

Mrs. C. P. Hardin 
Mrs. W. H. McCallum 
Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 
Miss Thelma Stevens 



Joint Committee on Christian Educa- 
tion in Foreign Fields — 

Mrs. Glenn E. Laskby 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 
Executive Secretaries, Department of 
Work in Foreign Fields 

Joint Committee on Missionary Per- 
sonnel — 

Mrs. William T. Anderson 
Mrs. C. L. Cooper 
Mrs. Robert K. Gordon 
Mrs. Paul G. Masters 
Mrs. T. Otto Nall 

Ex Officio (with vote) 
Mrs. C. P. Hardin 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 
Mrs. J. Fount Tillman 

Ex Officio (without vote) 

Miss Alpharetta Leepeb 

Miss J. Margueritb Twinem 

Executive Secretaries of Department of 
Work in Home Fields, Department of 
Work in Foreign Fields, and Section 
of Education and Cultivation 

Joint Committee on Temperance Edu- 
cation— 

Mrs. A. R. Henry 
Miss Thelma Stevens 

Methodist Committee for Overseas 
Relief— 

Miss Margaret Billingsley 
Miss Clara M. French 
Miss Ruth Lawrence 



Interboard Committee on Christian 
Vocations of The Methodist 
Church— 

Miss Helen L. Johnson 
Miss Alpharetta Leepeb 

Interboard Committee on Missionary 
Education — 

Miss Helen L. Johnson 
Miss Elizabeth Stinson 

Interboard Committee on Town and 
Country Work — 

Mrs. Willis L. Perryman 
Miss L. Cornelia Russell 

Interstaff Consultative Committee 
With the Board of Hospitals and 
Homes — 

Miss Mary Lou Barnwell 

Miss Emma Burbib 

Mrs. Mabel Garrett Waqnri 



National Council of the Churches of 
Christ in the U.S.A.— 

General Board: 

Mrs. C C. Long 
Mrs. Charles W. Mead 
Mrs. W. N. Rivers 
Mrs. Wallace N. Stbeeteb 

Joint Commission on Missionary 
Education — 

Miss Juanita Brown 
Miss Dorcas Hall 
Miss Marguerite Harris 
Miss Helen L. Johnson 
Miss Lillian Johnson 
Miss Dobothy McConnell 
Mrs. C. A. Meekeb 
Mrs. E. Lb-Roy Stiffleb 
Miss Elizabeth Stinson 
Miss Ruby Van Hoose* 

Television, Radio and Film Commis- 
sion of The Methodist Church — 

Miss Dorcas Hall 



20 



Appointments of Missionaries in Foreign Fields 

* — on furlough ; J— pre-retirement furlough ; \ — special term missionary ; ( ) — national 



Africa 



ANGOLA CONFERENCE 

Luanda (loo-an'-da)^— 

Social-Evangelistic and Medical Work 
*Ada Mae Bookman, R.N. 
fMarcia Hinds 

Quessua (kesh'-oo-a)^— 

Educational Work and Boarding Department 
tDoris Marie Bennett 
Violet Crandall 
tMary Lou Sprague 
fAlberteen Ware 

Domestic Science 
Alpha Miller 

BELGIAN CONGO— CENTRAL CONFERENCE 
Lodja (lo'-ja)— 

Educational Worx and Girls' Home 

Lorena Kelly 

Sarah Reinecke 
| Ruth Ann Jones 
{Mary Jane Curry 

Minga-^ 

Educational Work and Girls' Home 
*Myrtle Zicafoose 
Mary E. Bozeman 
tBetty Jane Barker 

Medical Work 
♦Chlora Dean, R.N. 
*Ruth O 'Toole, R.N. 

Barbara Hartman 

Dorothy E. O'Neal, R.N. 

Tunda^— 

Educational Work and Girls' Home 

tRosa Ulsh 
Translation Work 

*Edith Martin 

Wembo Nyama (wem-bo' ny'-a-ma)— 

Educational Work and Girls' Home 
*Ethel Homfeldt 
Lorine Guess 
Norene Robken 

Medical Work 
•Dorothy Gilbert, R.N. 
tSimonne Van Ooteghem, R.N. 

Mutoto (moo-to'-to)— 

Union Secondary School 
*Annimae White 
Annie Laura Winfrey 

Katako Kombe (ka-ta-ka kom'-be)^— 

Medical Work 

Kathryn Eye, R.N. 
Crafts and Girls' Home 

Dorothy Rees 

BELGIAN CONGO— SOUTHERN 
CONFERENCE 
Elisabethrille 

Educational and Social-Evangelistic Work 
Dorothy Buser 



Celia Cowan 

Jane Crooks 

Catharine Parham 
tMarlene Harmon 
f Janette O. Geiger 

Kapanga (ka-pa'-nga)— 

Medical Work 

Tove Jensen, R.N. 
Educational Work 

Thelma Montgomery 

Mulungwishi (moo-loong-we-she)— 

Educational Work 
t Florence R. McKay 
{Elizabeth Ann Whyte 

Studying in Brussels— 

Pearl Bellinger 

LIBERIA CONFERENCE 
Ganta (gan'ta)— 

Medical Work 

Uniola Adams, R.N. 
Ella Marie Hill, R.N. 
Margaret M. Prentice, R.N. 

Monrovia— 

Hostel for Girls 

*Sallie Lewis Browne 
Mary Katharine Russell 

tMuriel C. Raak 
Educational Work 

tBarbara C. Patterson 

MOZAMBIQUE CONFERENCE 
Gikuki (je-koo'-ke)— 

Hartzell Girls' School 
Mabel Michel 
Ruth Northcott 
Mary Jean Tennant 
tCharlotte Lewis 
Medical Work 

Clara Bartling, R.N. 
*Karin Jonsson, R.N. 
Victoria Lang, R.N. 

Studying in Lisbon 

Barbara Kurtz 

NORTH AFRICA CONFERENCE 

Algeria 
Algiers^— 

Medical Work 

Laura Chevrin, R.N. 
Social-Evangelistic Work 

Liv Larsen 
Studying in England 

Marguerite A. Wolff 

Const antine— 

Gamble Memorial Home 

Gwendoline Narbeth 

Elsy Wendle 
Hannah Goodall Center 
fMary Ellen Furbush 

Mary Sue Robinson 



Appointments of Missionaries in Africa 



21 



Fort National — 

Social-Evangelistic Work 

tNancy Lee Blake 
Medical Work 

Emmy Gisler, R.N. 

II Maten (ell mat'en)— 

Missionary Personnel temporarily 
transferred to other Stations. 

Les Ouadhias (lay-zwa'-de-as)— 

SOCIAL-EVANGELISTIC AND MEDICAL WORK 

Helene Manz, R.N. 

Tunisia 
Tunis — 

Social-Evangelistic Work 
Marjorie Lochhead 

SOUTHERN RHODESIA CONFERENCE 
Mutambara— 

Nellie Dingley School 
Ila Scovill 
Grace Otto 

Rural Evangelism 
Marguerite Deyo 
*Lulu Tubbs 

Medical Work 

Ellen M. Sweeney, R.N. 

Nyadiri (ne-a-de'-re) — 

Girls' Boarding School 
Sarah King 



Evelyn deVries 
Frances Hackler 

Medical Work 
•Elma Ashby, R.N. 
Mrs. Pearl Willis Jones, R.N. 
Margit Johansson, R.N. 
Jenny Larsen, R.N. 
Ruth Lind, R.N. 

Conference Health Education 
Clara Nutting, M.D. 

Old Umtali (old oom-ta'-le) — 

Fairfield Girls' School 
Jessie Pfaff 
Signhild Hervold 

MiDiCAL Work 

Alice Whitney, R.N. 

Secondary School 
Edith Parks 
Mildred Taylor 
fDorothy M. Hickok 

Teaches Training School 
•Sylvia Aldrich 
Lois Pfaff 
tMildred Sawyer 
Vivian Otto 

Umtali (oom-ta'-le) 

African Girls' Hostel 
Employed Worker 

Social Evangelistic Work 
*Marcia Ball 
Esther J. Russell 



India 



ALL-INDIA INSTITUTIONS 
Allahabad (al-la'-ha-.bad)^— 

Agricultural Institute 

Ajmer (aj-meer)— 

Madar Union Tuberculosis Sanatorium 
Lora I. Battin, R.N. 
Elizabeth Carlyle, R.N. 
tMargaret V. Johnston 

Jabalpur, M.P. (jnb'-bul-poor)— 

Leonard Theological College 
Dorothy Strong 

Landour, Mussoorie, U.P. (Ian'-dur) — 

Community Hospital 
Louise Landon, R.N. 
Lucknow, U.P. (luck-now)— 

Isabella Thobuen College (Chand Bagh) 
(Chand bagh) 
tMarie Finger Bale 

Barbara Beecher 

(Dr. Evangeline Thillayampalam) 
JLulu Boles 

Marjorie Dimmitt 
tAva Hunt 

Florence Salzer 

Lillian Wallace 

Margaret Wallace 
•Laura Williams 



Methodist Publishing House, 
37 Cantonment Road 

Directorate op Literature 
37 Cantonment Road 
Eunice Sluyter 

Madras (ma-dr'i«)— 

Women's Christian College 
•Bertha May Corfield 

St. Christopher's Training College, Vepery 

Nagpur, M.P. (nag-poor)— 

National Christian Council 

Christian Council Lodge 

Ludhiana, U.P. (lu'-dhee-anna)^— 

Ludhiana Christian Medical College 
Margaret Tucker, M.D. 

Vellore, North Arcot District, Madras State 
( vel-lore' ) — 

Christian Medical College and Hospital 
Kathleen Norris, R.N. 

BENGAL CONFERENCE 

Asansol (ass-en'-sonl)— ■ 

District Evangelistic Work and Day Schoolb 

(Kumudini Mozumdar) 
Ushaobam High School 
Irma Collins 



22 



Calcutta— 

Girls' High School, 152 Dharamtala St. 
Vera Parks 
Irma Felchlia 
Kathryan Barber 

Bengali Evangelistic Woek 
Frances Major 

Hindustani Evangelistic Work 
130 Dharamtala Street 
Doris Welles 

Lee Memorial Mission 
13 Wellington Square 
(Smriti Das) 

Gomoh (go'-moh)^— 

Evangelistic Wobk and Dat Schools 
(Kumudini Mozumdar) 

Paknr, S.P., Bihar (pa'-kur) — 
Santali Evangelistic Wobk 
Ruth Eveland 

Distbict Public Health 
Bjorg Naess (Norway) 

Jioato Co-educational High School 

(Premi Lee) (Jee'-dat-to) 
Bengali Co-educational Middle School 

Ruth Eveland 

BOMBAY CONFERENCE 
Bombay— 

Hostel Manages, Maxathi Evangelistic Work, 
and Hostess House, 22 Club Back Rd., 
Byculla 
♦Jennie Blasdell 
Clara Kleiner 
Ruth Gish 

Social Work 
(Ivy Childs) 

Gujabatt Evangelistic Work 
(•Sumitra Trikamlal) 

Dhulia-Sangamner (doo'-Ie-ah-sung'-um-neer) 

Suvarta Hospital, W. Kandesh, Bombay State 
(Rose Daniel, M.D.) 

Nagpur, M.P. (nag-poor)— 

District Evangelistic Work 

Mecosa Bagh, Middle, Normal School and 
Hostel 
(Mrs. Mary Damle) 

Poona (poo'-na)^— 

Hutchings Girls' 
JMary Eide 
Emma Stewart 

Maeathi Litehatube 

"Ivy Towers", Lawrence Road 
Ada Nelson 

Puntamba (pun-tum'-ba) 

P&utABT School and Gibls' Hostel 
(Mrs. D. A. Francis) 

District Evangelistic and Adult Litebact 
Edna Holder 

Bowen-Bbuere Dispensary 
Edith Lacy, M.D. 



High School, 7 Phayre Rd. 



Talegaon, Bombay State (tel'-e-gown)— 

Okdelia Hillman Coeducational Primabt School 
and Hostel 
JS. Marie Corner 
Ada Nelson 

Kamalnagar, Bidar District (kam-aT-nug-er) — 

Evangelistic Woek 

Mildred Wright 
Coeducational Middle School 

Mildred Wright 

DELHI CONFERENCE 
Agra, U.P. (ah'-gra) 

Holman Institute 
Catherine Justin 

Aligarh, U.P. (a'-lee-gur)^— 

Louise Soulb Gibls' School 

Pearl Palmer 
Henby Martyn School op Islamics 
Distbict Evangelistic Wobk 

Mrs. ArDelia M. Robinson 

Batata District, Punjab (b-tal'-a) 

Mission School 
Lilly Swords 

JullunJur, East Punjab ( ju-lun'-dur) — 

United Chbistian Schools 

Bulandshahr, U.P. (bull-and'-shire) 

Distbtct Evangelistic Wobk 
Lois Biddle 

Delhi (deU'-he) — 

Butleb Memobial School 
17 Boulevard Road 

Ella Perry 
Distbict Evangelistic Wobk 

Colleen Gilmore 

Ghaziabad, U.P. (gliU'-zoc-bad) — 

Day School and Evangelistic Wobk 
252 Grand Trunk Road 

Let ah Doyle 
Bubgess Day School 

(Miss Singh) 
Ingbahah Institute and Hindi Day School 

Hissar, East Punjab (his'-sar)^— 

Ndi Niwas School 

(Javitri Masih) 
Evangelistic and Village Schools 

Martha Coy 

Landour, Mussoorie, U.P. — 

Language School Residence, "Rokeby" 
Letah Doyle 

Mathura, U.P. (mut'-tra) 

Blackstone Missionaby Institute 

(Agnes Shaw) 
District Evangelistic Wobk 
•Carolyn Schaefer 
Helen Buss 

Meerut, U.P. (meer'-ut) — 

Howard Plested Memobial Gibls' 
Higheb Secondary School 
Mildred Shepherd 



Appointments of Missionaries in India 



23 



Roorkee-Muzaffarnagar (roor'-kee) — 

Disteic Evangelistic and Village Schools, 
Roorkee, U. P. 

Girls' School, Roorkee, U. P. 
(Dolly Mathews) 

Vrindaban, U.P. (vrin '-da-bun)— 

Creighton-Freeman Memorial Hospital and 
School of Nursing 
Mary A. Buchard, M.D. 
tEunice Porter, R.N. 
Elda Mae Barry, R.N. 
Borghild Sorensen, R.N. (Norway) 
*Maria Munkejord, R.N. (Norway) 

GUJARAT CONFERENCE 
Ahmedabad (ahm'-da-bad) — 

City Evangelistic Work and Day Schools 

Baroda Residency (bh-rod'-da) — 

Village Educational and Evangelistic Work 

Florence Palmer 
Webb Memorial High School and Hostel 

(Miss Esther Desai) 
Public Health Work 

Elizabeth Overby, R.N. 
Butler Memorial Hospital 

Elizabeth Overby (Business Manager) 

Codhra, Panch Mahals (go'-dra)'^ 

Normal and Practicing School 
*Wanda Stahley 
Elizabeth Fairbanks 

Nadiad, Kaira District (nh'-dee-ad)— 

Village Educational and Evangelistic Work, 

Mission Rd. 
Pearl Precise 

Methodist Hospital, School of Nursing 
Theresa Lorenz, R.N. 
Myrtle Precise, R.N. 

School of Laboratory Technicians 
Hannah Gallagher 

HYDERABAD CONFERENCE 
Bidar, Deccan (bee'-dar)^— 

Norma Fendrich Co- Educational Middle School 

Ada Luke 
Methodist Hospital and School of Nursing 

Florence Wright, R.N. 
District Evangelistic Work 

(Ada Luke) 
Chidaguppa (chid'-a-grip-pa)— 

Evangelistic and Educational Work 
(Manoranjini Andriah) 

Danlatabad (dal'-a-ta-bad ) — 

Central Primary Boarding School 

Josephine Kriz (use Tandur address) 

Evangelistic Work 

Josephine Kriz (use Tandur address) 

Hyderabad, Deccan (high'-da-ra-bad) — 

Stanley Girl*' High School 

(Chanda Christdas) 
Hindustani Evangelistic Work 

(Mrs. K. V. Joseph) 
Telbou Evangelistic Work 

(Mrs. K. V. Joseph) 



Tandur, Deccan (tan-dur) — 

Central Primary Boarding School 

District Evangelistic Work, Methodist Mission 
Josephine Kriz 

Vikarabad, Deccan (yi-care'-a-bad)— 

Mary A. Knott Co-Educational Middle School 
(Padma Radiah) 

Evangelistic Wo*k 
(Pushpa Solomon) 

Public Health Work 
Eunice LaRue, R.N. 
Zaheerabad, Deccan (z-heer'-a-bad) — 

Conference Vocational Coeducational Middij: 
School 

(Edith Delima) 
Evangelistic Work 

(Maria Venkiah) 

LUCKNOW CONFERENCE 
Allahabad, U.P. — 

Boys' Middle School 
(Miss H. Roy) 

Arrah, Bihar (ar'-rah) — 

Sawtelle Memorial School and Hostels 
JMaren Tirsgaard (Denmark) 
(Mrs. Edith Phillips) 

Ballia, Bihar (bul'-lia) — 

Evangelistic and Educational Work 

Adis Robbins 
Rasra Boys' Hostel 

Adis Robbins 

Buxar, Bihar (bux'-r)— 

Brides' School and Nursery School 
(Shanti Badre) 

Evangelistic and Educational Work 
P. O., Gajadharganj 
Mabel Sheldon 

Public Health and Simri Village Center 
Meriel McCall, R.N. 

Conda, U.P. (gon'-da)^— 

Chambers Memorial Coeducational School 
(Martha Sahai) 

Kanpur, U.P. (kan'-poor) 

Methodist High School 
Evelyn Strader 
Mae Wiggins 

Hudson Memorial Coeducational Middle School 

(Clara Joseph) 
Evangelistic Work and Day Schools 

Lucknow, U.P.^— 

Lal Bagh Girls' Higher Secondary School 
Edna Hutchens 
JElizabeth Hobart 
Janette Crawford 

Evangelistic Work 

Central Treasurer, Lal Bagh Methodist Church 
Bessie A. Hollows 
JEthel L. Whiting 

Nur-Manzil Psychiatric Center 
Frances Hindley 



24 



Inter-Conference Program of Student-Centered 

Activities— 

152 Dharamtala St., Calcutta 
Irene Wells 

MADHYA PRADESH (Central Province*) 
CONFERENCE 
Bailiar, Balaghat, M.P. (by'-her) 

District Evangelistic Work 
Middle Coeducational School and Hostel 
(Sarah Kashi Ram) 

Jabalpur, M.P. (jub'-bnl-poor)— 

District Evangelistic Work 
(Mrs. John Hulasi Rai) 

Johnson Gdkls' High School 
(Ami Gadre) 

City Evangelistic Work, City School, Pili 
Kothi, 323 Napier Town 
Louise Campbell 

Hawa Bagh Teachers College 
*Marian Warner 
(Zillah Soule) 

Jagdalpar, Bastar State, M.P. (jug'-diil-poor)^— 

District Etangelistic and Educational Work, 
Hostel and Medical Work 

Alderman Coeducational Middle School 
(Shantoshini Das) 

Khandwa, M.P. (khun'-d-wah) 

Citt and District Evangbustic and Educational 
Work 
Ida Klingeberger 

Girls' Middli School 
(Pila Baksh) 

Christian Normal School 
(*Agnes Judah) 
(Lena James) 

Narsingpnr, M.P. (ner'-singh-poor)— 

District Evangelistic Work 

Sironcha, M.P. (see-ron'-cha)— 

Citt and District Evangelistic Work 

F. C. Davis School 

Classon Memorial Hospital 
(Jaya Luke, M.D.) 

Venketapnr, M.P. (ven-ket'-a-poor)^— 

Evangelistic Work and Village Schools 



Clara Swain Hospital, School or Nursing, and 
School op Laboratory Technicians 
Mary Gordon, R.N. 
Bijnor, U.P. (bij'-nor) 

Evangelistic Work 

Marietta Mansfield 
Lois Lee Parker Girls' School 

(Piyari Phillips) 

Budaun, U.P. (bi'-down) — 

Evangelistic Work 

Gladys Webb 
Sigleb Girls' School 

(Dora Walters) 
Arts and Crafts School 

Garhwal, U.P. (gur'-wal)^— 

Evangelistic Work, Pauri 
Mary Ensign Gill School, Gandoli, Pauri 
Betty Penn 

Pithoragarh, U.P. (pi-tor'-S-gur) — 

Evangelistic Work 

Martha Shelby 
Lucy Sullivan Girls' School 

(Miss Francis) 

Moradabad, U.P. (mo-rad'-a-bad)— 

Evangelistic and Educational Work 
JEthel Calkins 
Gladys Doyle 
Jean Cale, R.N. 

Girls' Middle and Normal Schools 

Edna Bradley 
Titus Basic School 

Sliahjahanpur-Sitapur, U.P. 
(shah-j-han'-poor) (see'-ta-poor) 

All-India Accounting and Bookkeeping Seminars 
Methodist Mission, Shahjahanpur, U. P. 

Mildred Albertson 
Evangelistic Work 

(Persis Stephens) 

Bidwell Memorial Girls' School, Shahjahanpur, 
U. P. 

JNellie West 
Ann Tillou 

Methodist Girls' School, Sitapur, U. P. 

(Gladys Richards) 
Boys' Primary School, Sitapur, U. P. 

Grace Honnell 



NORTH INDIA CONFERENCE 
Almora, U.P. (al-more-uh.) — 

Adams Girls' High School 
♦Ruth Cox 
Una Mann 

District Evangelistic Work, Dangoli 
Charlotte Westrup 

Bareillr, U.P. (bnh-ray'-Iee) — 

District Evangelistic Work 

Grace Bates 
Girls' Middle School 

(Ribqah Benjamin) 
Waenb Baby Fold 

Maude Nelson, R.N. 

Hildegard Grams (Germany) 



SOUTH INDIA CONFERENCE 
Bangalore (bSn'-ga-lore)— 

Baldwin Girls' High School 
Ruth Daniels 

Belgaum, Bombay State (bell'gaum)— 

Fairfield 

Carol Sibert, R.N. 
Evangelistic Work and Village Schools 

Virginia Baldwin 
Sherman School for Girls 
tAlta Griffin 

Virginia Baldwin 

Vanita Vidyalaya High School and 
Watson Schools 
(Chandrika Desai) 



Appointments of Missionaries in Pakistan 



25 



Fales Health Cbnteb, Devarshigihalli 
(Da'va-shig-I-hall'-lee) 
(Maria Selvanayagam, M.D.) 
Carol Sibert, R.N. 

Gokak (go-cock)— 

Village Schools 
Evangelistic Work 
Dhupdal School and Hostel 

Gulbarga, Deccan (gfil-berg'-a)— 

vljata vldtalaya coeducational hlgh school 
Shanti Sadan Hostel 
{Emma Rexroth 
Ollie Leavitt 

Evangelistic Work 
{Emma Rexroth 
Ollie Leavitt 

Kolar, Mysore State (ko'-lar)— 

Ellen T. Cowen Memorial Hospital and School 
of Nursing 
Esther Shoemaker (M.D.) 
Wine Huitema, M.D. (Holland) 
Jean Tarwater, M.D. 
Ruby Hobson, R.N. 
Maxine Coleman 

Coeducational High School 

(Sundra Edwards) 
Evangelistic Work 

Madras— 

Nursery Training Center and Schools, Vepery 
2 Ritherdon Rd., Vepery 
Joy Comstock 

Raichur, Deccan (ri'-chur)^— 

Evangelistic Work and Day Schools 

Louise Saladin (Switzerland) 
Coeducational school and Hostel 

(Elizabeth James) 
Sirwar Health Center 

Shorapur, Yadgirl District, Deccan (sho'-ra-poor) 

EVANGELISTIC WORK AND MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Marguerite Bugby 
Primary Boarding School 

(Mary B. Ratnam) 
Chamanaal Health Center 

Yadgiri, Taluq, Deccan (yad'-ge-ree) 

Yellabi Dispensary and Health Center 
(Yel-ler'-e) 
(Deena Sonna, M.D.) 
Eva Logue, R.N. 



Evangelistic Work 

Marguerite Bugby (use Shorapur address) 
Holston Hospital 



Pakistan 



Lahore (l'-hor) — 

Lucie Harrison Girls' High School 
15 Warris Road 
•Margaret Boss 
Mary Winn 
tEvelyen Weaver 

Kinnaibd College fob Wombn 

Elsie Reik 

Helen Ferris 

Ruth Wolfe 
Kinnaibd Teacheb Training Centei 
evanoelistic wobk 

Anna Buyers, R.N. 

Raewind Pbimary Boys' School 

United Christian Hospital 
P. O. Forman College 
Jean Bagnall, R.N. 

Mnltan (mul-tan')— 

Conference Health Work 

Ann Buyers, R.N. (use 15 Warris Road) 
Evangelistic Work and Village Schools 
Stuntzabad School 
Rural Health Work and Dispensaby 

Anna Buyers, R.N. 

Sind-Baluchistan (sind-b-loo'-key-stan) — 

Dbigh Road Day School 

Karachi (care-ra'-chee)^— 

Girls' High School 
163-B/3 P.E.C.H.S. 

Constance Blackstock 

Earline Hart 
fWynell Jordan 

City Work 

Constance Blackstock 



Nepal 



Kathmandn (kat-mun-du') — 

Mission Hospital and Nubses' Training School, 
Medical Mission House, Kupandol 
Eunice Stephens, Laboratory Technician 



Japan and Korea 



JAPAN 
Beppu (bep'-poo)— — 

Social Evangelistic Wobk 
Alberta Tarr 

Fukuoka (foo-koo-o'-kii)— 

Kindbbgabten, Evangelistic and Social Wobk 
*Helen Boyles 
Dorothy Croskrey 

Fukuoka Gibls' School 

(Miss Yoshi Tokunaga,) Principal 
Elizabeth Howell 
Jenny Lind 



Hakodate (ha-ko-da-te')— 

Iai Gibls' Junior and Senior High School 
(Mr. Nobuyoshi Obata,) Principal 
S. Rebecca Giles 
*Rose Waldron 
tRuth Nelson 

Hirosaki (he'-ro-sa-ke)— 

Seiai Jo Gakko (Girls' Junior and Senior High 
School) 
(Mr. Shinshi Oda,) Principal 
Blanche Brittain 
Gertrude Byler 
*Maud Parsons 



26 



Abu Evangelistic Wobk 
Gertrude Byler 

KlNDTEGABTSN WORK 

Gertrude Byler 

Hiroshima (lie-ro'-she-iiia)— 

Misasa Center 

(Fukushima Social Evangelistic Center) 
(foo-kdo'-she-ma) 
Mary Jones 

Hiroshima Junior and Seniob High School 
(Miss Hamako Hirose,) President 

(ha-ma'-ko he-ro'se) 
Mary Bedell 
JLois Cooper 
tRae Beth Parrott 

Hiroshima Woman's College 

(Miss Hamako Hirose,) President 
(ha-ma'-ko he-ro'se) 
•Mary Finch 
Mary McMillan 
Charlotte Alston 

Kagoshima (ka-go-she'-niii ) — 

KlNDEBGAETEN AND SOCIAL-EVANGELISTIC WOBK 

Margery Mayer 

Kawanchi Mara, Shikoka (ka-wa-oo'che moo'ra, 
she-ko'-koo)^— 

Rueal Evangelistic Work 
Eleanor Warne 

Kitsuki-Oita Ken (ket-soo-ke o-e'-ta ken)^— 

Evangelistic Work 
JManie C. Towson 

Kobe (ko'-be) 

Keimei Girls' School (ka-ma) 

(Mr. Masahisa Tobita,) President 
tAddie K. Chamberlain 

Palmorb Institutb 

(Mr. James T. Ishii,) Principal 

Christian Youth Centos 
Gertrude Feely 

Area Church Camp 
Gertrude Feely 

Language School 
Marie McLain 
Doris Hartman 

Kofu (ko-foo) — 

Evangelistic Work 
Alice Boyer 

Kumamoto (koo-ma-mij -to I — 

Evangelistic Work 
•Iris C Allum 

Nagasaki (na'-ga-sa-ke)— 

Kwassui Junior College, Junior and Sbnioi 
High School 
(kas'-swg) 
Caroline S. Peckham, Principal 
Ethel Bost 
Olive Curry 
t Joyce Koch 
Helen Moore 
Elizabeth Tennant 

Nagasaki Christian Yuaikbn 
(Community Center) 



Nishinomiya (ne-she-no-me'-ya) — 

Seiwa Joshi Gakuin (Training School for kin- 
dergarten teachers and religious education 
workers) 

(sa'-wa jo'-she ga-koo-en) 
Mabel Whitehead, Principal 
*Pearl McClain 
Anne Peavy 

Oiiomishi (Hiroshima Ken) (o-no-me'-ske) — 

Evangelistic Work 
Elizabeth Bandel 

Osaka — 

Seiwa Shakai Kwan (Social Center) 
(sa-wa sha-ki kwan) 
Sallie E. Carroll 

Tokyo (to'-kyo) — 

Aikei Gakuen (Social Evangelistic Center) 
(I'ka ga-koo-en) 
*Mildred Anne Paine 
Esther Selvey 

Aoyama Gakuin (College, Junior College, Junior, 
& Senior High School, and Primary School) 
(a-o-ya'-ma ga'-kod-en) 

(Dr. Ganjo Kosaka,) President 

(gan'-jo ko-sa'-ka) 
Barbara Bailey 
Alice Cheney 
Mary Belle Oldridge 
t Kathleen Register 
Mary Foster 

Tokyo Woman's Christian College 
(Dr. Sadaji Takogi,) President 
(sa-da'-je ta-ko'-ge) 
tSara Rodes 

Union Theological Seminary 

(Dr. Hidenobu Kuwada,) President 
(hg-den-6'-b66 koo-wa'da) 

Mary Belle Oldridge (Part time) 
Japan International Christian University 
Audio Visual Aids Commission (AVACO) 
Evangelism fob the Blind 

Church School Department or the National 

Christian Council 
Keisen Jo Gakuin 

(ka'-sen jo ga'-k66-5n) 

National Christian Education Association 

Religious Education Curriculum 

Woman's Family Life Commission 

Language School 
Elizabeth Clarke 
Lucy Dail 
Anna Givens 
Martha Meek 
Geneva Morris 
Marilyn Watson 
Gloria Reed 
Mary Eads 

Sapporo-ken Hokkaido (sap-po-ro ken ho-ki-do)^— 

Noppobo Rural Pbojbct 
Hazel Rippey 

Tsnyazaki (tsoo-ya'-sa-ke) — 

Rural Evangelistic Centse 
Alio* Hitchcock 



Appointments of Missionaries in Korea 



27 



Yokohama 

Seibi Gakuen (Girls' Junior and Senior High 
School and Primary School) 
(sfi-be ga'-kdo-en) 
(Dr. Asa Yumoto,) Principal 
Alice Alsup 
*Helen Barns 
Margaret Maiden 
tCarolyn Bowen 

Lancuage School 
Louneta Lorah 

KOREA 

Choonchun (choo'n-chon) — 

District Evangelistic Work 

Chunan (chon'-an)— 

Distbict Evangelistic Work and Day Schools 

Incliun (en'chon) — 

Community Center 
Maude Goff 

Evangelistic Work 
tPeggy Brooks 

Methodist Hospital 

(Dr. S. P. Kang,) Superintendent 
Barbara Moss, M.D. 

Public Health and Welfare Work 
Barbara Moss, M.D. 

Yong Wha Girls' School 
(yong' wha) 
(Mr. Hong Soo Ryn,) Principal 

Kangnung (kang'-nung) — 

Evangelistic Work 

Mrs. Irene T. Swinney 

Clinic and Language Study 
Marian Kingsley 

Kongju (kong'-joo) — 

Baby Fold 

Olive Ratliff, R.N. 

Ptisan (p5o-san')^— 

Community Center 

(Miss Yon De Kang,) Director 
JMollie Townsend, R.N. 
tEsther Stoffer 

Public Health and Evangelistic Work 
Helen Rosser 

Seoul (sol)^— 

Christian Literature Society 

Coordinator of Mission Schools 
•Emma Wilson 

Christian Family Lire Program 
Clara Howard 

Board of Religious Education or the Korean 
Methodist Church 

Radio, Visual Education and Mass Communica- 
tion Station 

Evangelistic Work 

Kate Cooper 
Methodist Seminary 

(Rev. Harold Hong,) President 

Sadie Maude Moore 
t Elsie Stockton 



Ewha College 
(e'-wha) 
(Dr. Helen Kim,) President 
Marion Conrow 
Frances Fulton 
Dorothy Hubbard 
t Harriett Morris 
tBetty Snead 

Ewha High School 
(eh' wha) 

Mr. Pong Cho Shin, Principal 
tBetty Blom 

Ewha Kindergarten 

Pai Wha Girls' School 
(pa' wha) 

Mrs. Soo Chin Kim, Principal 
fEmma Nell Wayland 

Neighborly House (Community Center) 
Euline Smith Weems 

Severance Hospital 

Dr. M. S. Kim, Superintendent 
Thelma Maw 
Vivian Gledhill, R.N. 
fFaith Whitaker, Laboratory Technician 

Severance Nurses' Training School 

Tai Wha Christian Community Center 
(ta' wha.) 
Peggy Billings 
fjane Stuntz 
Ruth Stewart 

Treasurer for the Woman's Division 
Lillian Montgomery 

Evangelistic Work (2 Districts) 
Euline Smith Weems 

Wyatt Baby Fold 

MCOR 

Marion Shaw, R.N. 

Office Work 
fChasteen Shine 

Language Study 
Dr. Roberta Rice 

Suwon (soo'-won) — 

Suwon Girls' School 

(Mr. Chin Han Ham,) Principal 
Evangelistic Work 

Taejon (ta'-jon) — 

Community Center 
Esther Laird, R.N. 

Evangelistic Work 
JBessie Oliver 

Holston Girls' School 

(Mr. Ki Sun Kang,) Principal 
t Marilyn Terry 

Kindergarten Training School 
Clara Howard 

Public Health Work 
Olive Ratliff, R.N. 

NCC Literacy Program 
Edith Simester 



28 



Wonju (won-joo')^— 

District Etangelistic Work 
Rural Public Health Wort 
Wonju Hospital 



Ichon (e'-chon)^— 

Evangelistic Work 
Yang Chung Girls' School 
(yang jon'-g) 
(Rev. Dong Ok Kim,) Principal 



Latin America 



ARGENTINA 
Buenos Aires (bway'nos I-rays) — 

Union Theological Seminary, Camacua 282 
Josephine Abrams 
•Patricia Woodruff 

Rosario— 

Coleoio Americano, Av. Pellegrini 1352 
Patricia Richardson 
tPatricia Riddell 

BOLIVIA 
La Paz^— 

Rural Work 
Escuela de Ninas 
Ancoraimbs, via La Paz 
Virginia Bunn 

Sucre Student Hostel, Casulla 248 
Thelma Cooley 

NORTH BRAZIL 

Belo Horizonte (bavlo orezontay ) 

Colegio Isabela Hbnorix 
tHelen Denney 
Verda Farrar 
*Zula Terry 

Rio de Janeiro— 

Colegio Bennett, Marques de Abrantes 55 
Sarah Dawsey 

People's Central Institute 

Rua Rivadavia Correa 188 
*Mary Bowden 
tVerna Bradley 
Mary McSwain 
Elsie L. Parker 

Orphanage 

Instituto Ana Gonzaga 

Av. Cesario de Melo 2797 

Inhoaila, D.F., Rio de Janeiro 
(een-oa-ee'-la) 
Gladys Oberlin 

CENTRAL BRAZIL 
Piracicaba (pee-rah-se-cah'-bah) — 

Colegio Ptracicabano 
*Frances Bowden 
Irene Hesselgesser 

Sao Paulo (sah-o pah'-oo-Io) — 

Instituto Metodista (may-to-dee-stah) 
Caixa 12681, Santo Amaro, S. P. 
Sarah Bennett 
Frances Burns 
t Beverly Chain 

General Board of Christian Education 
Largo da Polvora 96 
Rosalie Brown 

Religious Education Work 
Largo da Polvora 96 
Rosalia Jenkins 



SOUTH BRAZIL 
Porto Alegre (portoh a-lay-gray)^— 

Colegio Americano 

Rua Dr. Laura de Oliveira 71 
Mary Helen Clark 
tDonna Jane McMurray 

Santa Maria^— 

Colegio Cbntbnario 

(Co-lay-jee-o Centen-ahr' eeo) 
Louise Best 
Alice Denison 
•Florence Ford 
tWilma Roberts 
Lab Metodista 
Joy Betts 

CHILE 
Angol— 

El Vergel (al-ver-hail) 

Semeramis C. Kutz 
Rural Work 
Casilla 69 

Nueva Imperial (nway-vah-eem-pay-ree-al') 
Casilla 69 
Ann Ragsdale 

CUBA MISSION 
Cienfuegos (see-en-fooay-gos)— 

Colegio Eliza Bowman 
Apartado 66 
Katherine M. Donahue 
Joyce Hill 
Esther Hulbert 
*Mattie Lou Neal 
Mary Woodward 

Havana— 

Colegio Buenavista (Booe-nah-vees'-ta) 
Apartado No. 5, Marianao 
Lorraine Buck 
Carroll English 
Agnes Malloy 
tBarbara Anne Smith 

Student and District Work 
Centro Universitario 
K y 25, Vedado 
flmogene Els wick 

Santa Ro9a— 

Rural Work 

Apartado 105, Jovellanos (ho-vay-ya'-nos) 
tClaribell Gallivan 
Leora Shanks 

Matanzas (niah-talm-sahs) — 

Union Theological Seminary 
Apartado 149 
Eulalia Cook 
Lois Davidson 
Colegio Irene Toland 
(Nize Fernandez) 
Elizabeth Earnest 
Juanita Kelly 
Preston, Oriente— 

Escuela Aoeicola y Industrial 
Elizabeth Beale, R.N. 



Appointments of Missionaries in Latin America 



29 



Omaja, Oriente (o-mah-ha) — 

Rural Work 
Sara Fernandez 

H err a dura, Pinar Del Rio (pee-nahr' del rce-o)- 

Social Work 

Patsy Ruth Alexander 
'Frances Gaby 

Baguanos, Oriente (bah'-gooah-nos) — 

Rural Work 
tBetty Campbell 
Virginia Chapman 

MEXICO 
FRONTIER CONFERENCE 

Chihuahua (ehee-wah-wah) — 

Centro Cristsano 
Apartado 50 
Olive Givin 
M. Irene Nixon 
Faithe Richardson 

Sanatorio Palhorz 

Olivia Dickhaut, R.N. 
*Lorena Foster, R.N. 
Pearl Hall, R.N. 
Lula Rawls, R.N. 

COLEGIO PaLMORB 

(Francisco Cepeda) 

Student Hostel, Calle 12, No. 1630 
May B. Seal 

Durango (doo-rahn'-go)— 

Centro MacDonell 
Juarez 200 Ute 

(Olga Vela) 
JRuth Byerly 
{Margaret Wade Campbell 

COLGGIO MacDoNELL 

(Estela C. de Moreno) 

Saltillo (gahl-tee'-lyo)^— 

Centro Social Roberts 
Victoria 307 
(Dolores Gomez) 
tSelma Reynolds 

Monterrey (mon-ter-ray)— 

Centro Social 

Apartado 446 
Iva Conner 
*Anna Belle Dyck 
Naomi Hare 
Helen Hodgson 

Instituto Laurrnb, Washington 208 Ote. 
Dora Schmidt 

Public Health, Villa de Santiago, N. L. 
Pauline Willingham, R. N. 

General Teran (hen-er-ahl' tay-rahn')— 

Rural Work 

Anne Deavours 

Reynosa (ray-no-sah)^— 

Hidalgo 350 Ote. 

Social-Evangelistic Work 
(Gertrudis Reyes) 
(Hair-troo-dis Ray-yays) 



CENTRAL CONFERENCE 
Mexico City— 

Deaconess Training School 
Sadi Carnot 73 
Gertrude Arbogast 
Ruth Warner 

Colegio Sara Alarcon (Ahl-ar kon) 

(Delphina Huerta) 
Laura Templb Hostel, Mariano Escobedo 291 
Colonia Anahuao (Co-lo'-nee-a Ah-noh'wahc) 
Orlene McKimmey 
tAudrey Sowers 

Religious Education, Apartado 26203 
Mary Fitzpatrick 

Pachnca (pah-choo-kah) — 
Colegio Hijas de Allbnde 

(Ee-hahs-day A-yen'day) 
(Manuela A. Vargas) 

Pnebla (poo-ay'-blah)— 

Student Hostel, Apartado 157 
Ola E. Callahan 
Clara Gibson 
tBobbie Mae Matthews 

Instituto Normal Mexico 
(Angela Lozano) 

Cortazar (cort-ah-zahr')— 

Evangelistic Work 
1. Ramirez No. 7 
Mamie Baird 
tDaphine Swartz 

Guanajuato (gwatn-a-hu at-oli ) 

Colegio Juarez 

(Celida Reyes de Aguilar) 

Studying Language in Costa Rica— 

Apartado 2240, San Jose, Costa Rica 
Marcella Mathys 

PERU 
Lima (lee'-mah)— 

Lima High School 
Apartado 2144 
tJanet Evans 

Mary Helen Games 

Christine Hackman 

Jane Hahne 
*Mabel Lorah 

Opal Meier 

Treva Overholt 

Dorothy Sandfort 
t Grace Spradling 

La Florida Social Center (lah flo-ree'-dah) 
Martha Vanderberg 

Callao (cah-yah'-o)— 

Callao High School, Apartado 240 
*Ella Greve 



URUGUAY (oo-roo-gwa) 
Montevideo (mon-tay-vee-day'-o)— 

Crandon Institute 

Casilla de Correa 445 
Lois Finke 
"Alvema Koch 
Dorothy Nelson 
tNathalee Pennington 
Shirley Small 

Malvin Social Center 



30 



Southeast Asia and China 



BURMA 
Kalaw (ka-Ia') — 

Kingswood School 
Maurine Cavett 
tPatricia Clark 

Rangoon (rang-goon') — 

BUBMEBB WOEK 

Stella Ebersole 

CONFEBBNCE RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

tElizabeth Callis 

CONFEBENCB MUSIC DlBECTOR 

tJeanne Wintringham 

English School 

(Mrs. G. M. Logie) 

Social-Evangelistic Work 
Chinese 

Orvia A. Proctor 
*Hazel Winslow 

Treasurer and Correspondent 
Stella Ebersole 

HONG KONG 
Hong Kong— 

Business Office 
*Myrtle Smith 
Etha Nagler 

Social-Evangelistic Work 
Etha Nagler 

INDONESIA 
Medan (ma-dan') — 

Batak Woek 
Bible School 

Gusta Robinett 
Chinese High School 
Educational Work 

Jessie Wolcott 
Evangelistic Work 

Gusta Robinett 
Teeasueer and Correspondent 

Gusta Robinett 

MALAYA 

I poll (S'-po) — 

Anglo-Chinese Girls' School 
(Daisy Moreira) 
Marion Cole 
fMary Barkes 

Methodist Girls' Afternoon School 
(Mrs. Khoo Kam Saw Tuan) 

Kuala Lumpur (kwa'la loom'-poor')- 

Conferenob Woman's Work 

Helen Loomis 
Methodist Girls' School 

Laura Schleman 
fCaroline Plank 

Methodist Girls' Afteenoon School 
(Mrs. Evelyn Chan Voltz) 

Malacca (ma-lak'-a) — 

Malay Hostel 



Methodist Giels' Continuation School 

(Mrs. Loh Hung Loon) 
Methodist Girls' School 

(Mrs. Loh Hung Loon) 

Helen Desjardins 

Shellabear Hall 
Miriam Gruber 

Penang (pe-nang')— 

Anglo-Chinese Girls' School 
Kathleen Clancy 
*Ann L. Harder 
Margaret Seeck 

Methodist Girls' Afternoon School 
(Madame Goh Siew Choo) 

Raub (rawb)— 

Methodist Giels' School 
A. Mabel Mitchell 

Singapore (sing'-ga-por')^— 

Fairfield Guls' School 

(Mrs. Lim Boek Kee) 
Faiefield Giels' Afternoon School 

(Mrs. Goh Soon Ho) 
Hinghwa Church 

Ellen Suffern 
Malayan Christian Council 

Literature and Evangelistic Work 
♦Mabel R. Nowlin 

Methodist Bookroom 

Mbthodibt Giels' Hostel 

(Miss Dorothy Hsu) 
Methodist Giels' School 

(Mrs. Ellioe Handy) 
Methodist Giels' Afteenoon School 

(Miss Dorothy Hsu) 
Straits Chinese Methodist Church 

Mathilde Killingsworth 
Teeasueee and Official Coerespondent 
tMary A. Blackford 

Mathilde Killingsworth 

Treasurer-Work Account 

(Dora Cheng) 
Trinity College 
*Florence W. Smith 

Helen Desjardins 

Sitiawan (sit'-i-a'-wan) — 

Anglo -Chinese School 

Ruth Parks 
New Villages 

Alma Eriksen, R.N. 
*Evelyn Mercer 

Social and Clinic Work 

Alma Eriksen, R.N. 
Social- Evangelistic Woek 
•Evelyn Mercer 

Taiping (tl'-plng') 

Giels' Hostel 
t Rosalie Fritz 



Appointments of Missionaries in Southeast Asia 



31 



Lady Treacher Girls' School 
(Flora R. Knight) 
Louise Killingsworth 
Rosalie Fritz 

Rest Homb 
♦Mechteld Dirksen, R.N. 

SOCIAL-EVANGELISTIC WORK 

*Mechteld Dirksen, R.N. 

PHILIPPINES 
Bagnio (ba'-ge-o')— 

Rest Home 

Bayombong (ba'-yom-bong')^~ 

Agricultural Extension Work 
nueva vlscaya— isabela districts 

*Thelma Hammond 

tBeverly Jackson 

Lingayen (ling'-ga-yan') — 

Dormitory fob Girls 
(Isabel Garcia) 

Pangasinan District 
Dana Tyson 

Manila (ma-nil'-a)— 

Christian Literature 
*Doris Hess 
(Virginia Maniti) 

Friendship Hall (Girl's Dormitory for Students 
of the University of the Philippines) 
Madaleine Klepper 
(Maria Aquino Gonzales) 

Harris Memorial School 
(Prudencia L. Fabro) 
Leila Dingle 
Elizabeth Johannaber 
tJo Ann Barker 

Home and Family Life Department or the Phil- 
ippine Federation op Christian Churches 

Manila and Bulacan Districts 
Elizabeth Johannaber 

Mary Johnston Hospital and School op Nursino 
(Librada Javalera) 
Elston Rowland, R.N. 
Lucy Blanton (Language study) 

Methodist Social Center 
Madaleine Klepper 
(Celeste Paraso) 

Official Correspondent 
Elizabeth Johannaber 

Philippine Christian Colleges 

JOvidia Hansing 
Student Work in Colleges 
Treasurer 

Mrs. Sallie B. Masten 

Mindanao (min'-da-na'-o) — 

Evangelistic Work 

•Carol Moe 
Mobile Clinic 



San Fernando, Pampanga (pam-pang'-ga)— 

Pampanga— South Tarlac Districts 
t Sybil Casbeer 
Eden Thomas Home 
tSybil Casbeer 

San Mateo (san ma-ta'-o) — 

Conference Youth and Music Work 

Betty Rogers 
North-South Cagayan Districts 

Betty Rogers 
Rural Mobile Clinic 

(Josefina Cabanilla) 

Tarlac City (tar'-lak) 

Nueta Ecija — North Tarlac Districts 

Marion Walker 
Methodist Dormitory 

Marion Walker 

Tugnegarao (too-ga'-ga-ra'-o)^— 

Student Center 
(Avenida Jose) 

Vigan, Ilocoa Sur (ve'-gan, il'-o-cos' s66r')^— 

Dudley Hall (Girls' Dormitory) 

(Saturnina Lara) 
Ilocos Sus-Central Luzon Districts 
*Carol Moe 
Dana Tyson 

SARAWAK 

SARAWAK in Borneo (sa-ra'-wa[k] ) 
Sibu (se'-boo)^— 

Agricultural Work 

*Jane Williams 
Evangelistic Work— City and District 

*Martha Graf 
Martha McCutchen 

High School 

t Ellen Atkinson 
Girls' Hostel 

tEllen Atkinson 

Kapit Medical Center 

Fannie Dewar 
Public Health Work 

Emma Palm, R.N. 
Theological School 

(Ivy Chou) 

Susie Mayes 

Taiwan (ti'-wan)-^ 

Home and Family Life 
Ortha Lane 

Special Appointments^— 

Irma Highbaugh — Allocated to International Mis- 
sionary Council for work in Home and Family 
Life in Asia. 

Ellen M. Studley— Allocated to United Board for 
Christian Higher Education in Asia for work in 
Chinese Student and Alumni Services in U. S. A. 



32 

FOREIGN MISSIONARIES— ACTIVE 

November 1, 1956 

(Field addresses are given on list of appointments.) 

Name Conference Address 

Abrams, Josephine S Western North Carolina Camacua 282, Buenos Aires, Argentina 

tAdams, Marie North Indiana Fortville, Ind. 

Adams, Uniola, R.N Texas Methodist Mission, Ganta (via Monrovia), Liberia, Africa 

Albertson, Mildred Nebraska Methodist Mission, Shahjahanpur, U. P. India 

*Aldrich, Sylvia Michigan. .. .Old Umtali, P. B. P. 24, Umtali, Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Alexander, Patsy Ruth Louisiana Herradura, Pinar del Rio, Cuba 

*Allum, Iris O Dakota 75 Okada Machi, Kumamoto Shi, Japan 

t Alston, Charlotte North Carolina Hiroshima Jo Gakuin, 49 Kami Nagarekawa Cho, 

Hiroshima, Japan 
Alsup, Alice Central Texas 124 Maita Machi, Minami-ku, Yokohama, Japan 

HAlthouse, Mildred L California 1026 E. Putnam, Porterville, Calif. 

II Anderson, Joy Learue, R.N South Carolina 117 Kinship Road, Baltimore 22, Md. 

Arbogast, Gertrude, R.N Rock River Sadi Carnot 73, Mexico 4, D. F., Mexico 

Ashby, Elma, R.N Louisiana Nyadiri, P. B. 636, E. Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

JAtkins, Ruth E Minnesota 1729 Beech St., St. Paul 6, Minnesota 

Atkinson, Ellen Baltimore Methodist Church, Sibu, Sarawak, Borneo 

Bagnall, Jean, R.N Detroit United Christian Hospital, P. O. Forman College, 

Lahore, Pakistan 

Bailey, Barbara Kansas 11 Konnocho, Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan 

Baird, Mamie Michigan 1 Ramirez No. 7, Cortazar, Gto, Mexico 

Baldwin, Virginia North-East Ohio Fairfield, Belgaum, Bombay State, India 

tBale, Mrs. Marie Finger .Wisconsin Isabella Thoburn College, Lucknow, U. P., India 

Ball Marcia-Mary Rock River P.B.P. 24, Umtali, Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Bandel, M. Elizabeth Baltimore c/o Takisaki Tatsumi, 12 Toyohimachi, Onomichi, 

Hiroshima Ken, Japan 

Barber, Kathryan, R.N Indiana Calcutta Girls' High School, 152 Dharamtala St. 

Calcutta, India 

tBarker, Betty June Florida M.M.C.C. Minga, Via Lusambo, Congo Beige, Africa 

{Barker, Jo Anne .Holston P. O. Box 1174, Manila, Philippines 

tBarkes, Mary Carolyn Rock River 4 Kampur Rd., Ipoh, Perak, Malaya 

*Barns, Helen V Newark 124 Maita Machi, Minami-ku, Yokohama, Japan 

Barry, Elda Mae, R.N Kansas. .Creighton- Freeman Memorial Hospital, Vrindaban, U. P., India 

Bartling, Clara J., R.N Pacific Northwest Box 41, Inhambane, Portuguese East Africa 

Bates, Grace Iowa-Des Moines Methodist Mission, Bareilly, U. P., India 

Battin, Lora I., R.N Illinois Madar Union Sanatorium, Madar, Ajmer, India 

Beale, Elizabeth S., R.N New York Escuela Agricola e Industrial, Preston, Oriente, Cuba 

HBecker, Gertrude Dakota Indian School, Flandreau, South Dakota 

Bedell, Mary Pacific Northwest 49 Kaminagarekawa Cho, Hiroshima Jo Gakuin 

Hiroshima, Japan 

Beecher, Barbara North Indiana Isabella Thoburn College, Lucknow, U. P. India 

Bellinger, Pearl Lexington 35 Rue Edith Cavall Uccle, Brussels, Belgium 

tBennett, Doris M Central Texas Caixa 9, Malange, Angola, West Africa 

Bennett, Sarah Mississippi Instituto Metodista, Caixa 12631, Santo Amaro 

(via Sao Paulo), Brazil 

Best, Louise South Carolina Colegio Centenario, Santa Maria, 

Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil 

Betts, Joy, R.N Western North Carolina Lar Metodisto, Santa Maria, Brazil 

Biddle, Lois Central Pennsylvania Methodist Mission, Bulandshahr, U. P., India 

*BiIlings, Peggy Mississippi Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 
Billingsley, A. Margaret Southern California- Arizona. ...150 Fifth Avenue, New York 11, N. Y. 

IBlackford, Mary St. Louis 444 Geneseo Road, San Antonio 9, Tex. 

Blackstock, Constance Philadelphia 163-B/3 P.E.C.H.S., Karachi 5, Pakistan 

tBlake, Nancy Lee North-East Ohio Methodist Mission, Lea Aiglons, Algiers, Algeria 

North Africa 

tBlasdell, Jennie Erie Frewsburg, New York 

tBlom, Betty Detroit Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

JBoles, Lulu A Texas 4538 59 St., San Diego, Calif. 

*Bookman, Ada Mae, R.N Virginia Caixa Postal 68, Angola, W. Africa 

Boss, Margaret Elizabeth Holston 15 Warris Road, Lahore, Pakistan 

Bost, Ethel W Western North Carolina Kwassui Junior College, 12 Higashi 

Yamate dori, Nagasaki Shi, Japan 

Bowden, Mary Elizabeth Central Texas Rua Rivadavia, Correa 188, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

Bowden, Sarah Frances Central Texas Colegio Piracicabano, Piracicaba, Sao Paulo, Brazil 

tBowen, Caroyln Sue Colorado 124 Maita Machi, Minami-ku, Yokohama, Japan 

flBoyde, Mary L Pittsburgh No. 4, 2244 Rugby Rd., Dayton 6, Ohio 

Boyer, Alice Philadelphia 2148 Ise Cho, Kofu, Japan 

*Boyles, Helen Ohio North Lewisburg, Ohio 

Bozeman, Mary Elizabeth Mississippi M.M.C.C. Minga (via Lusambo) 

Congo Beige, Africa 
Bradley, Edna Irene Genesee Methodist Girls' School, Moradabad, U. P., India 

tBradley, Verna Holston Rua Rivadavia, Correa 188, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

Brittain, Blanche Southern California-Arizona 9 Naka Kawarage Cho, Hirosaki, 

Aomori Ken, Japan 



Key: JPre-retirement. flLeave of Absence. tSpecial Term. *On Furlough. 



Foreign Missionaries — Active 33 

Name Conference Address 

tBrooks, Peggy Colorado Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

Brown, Rosalie S South Carolina Predio Jahu Apartmento 304, Largo da Polvora 96, 

Sao Paulo, Brazil 

♦Browne, Sallie Lewis Virginia College of West Africa, Monrovia, Liberia, West Africa 

Buck, F. Lorraine North Alabama Colegio Buenavista, Apartado No. 5, Marianao 

Havana, Cuba 

Bugby, M. Marguerite West Virginia Methodist Mission, Shorapur, Deccan, India 

Bunn, Virginia E Tennessee Escuela de Ninas, Encoraimes, via La Paz, Bolivia 

Burchard, Mary Agnes, M.D New York Creighton- Freeman Memorial Hospital, 

Vrindaban, U. P., India 

Burns, Fiances A Central Texas Methodist Institute, Caixa 12681, Santo Amaro, 

Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Buser, Dorothy Switzerland Box 522, Elisabethville, Belgian Congo, Africa 

*Buss, Helen Indiana Methodist Mission, Roorkee, U. P., India 

Buyers, Anna P., R.N Central Pennsylvania 15 Warris Rd., Lahore, Pakistan 

JByerly, Ruth Virginia Box 16, Remington, Va. 

Byler, Gertrude Central Kansas 9 Nakakawarage Cho, Hiroshima Shi, Japan 

Cale, Jean Louise, R.N Pittsburgh Methodist Mission, Moradabad, U. P., India 

JCalkins, Ethel Central Kansas 121 E. 8th St., Abilene Kansas 

Callahan, Ola Western North Carolina Apartado 157, Puebla, Pue., Mexico 

tCallis, Elizabeth Western North Carolina 242- A Creek Rd., Rangoon, Burma 

tCampbell, Betty Illinois Baguanos, Oriente, Cuba 

Campbell, E. Louise Illinois 323 Napier Town, Jabalpur, M. P., India 

Campbell, Margaret W Louisiana Apartado 446, Monterrey, Mexico 

Carlyle, Elizabeth, R.N Oregon Madar Union Sanatorium, Madar, Ajmer, India 

flCarr, (Mrs.) Hester Bruce South Georgia 108 Nichols St., Blackahear, Ga. 

Carroll, Sallie E Virginia. . .Seiwa Joshi Tanki Daigaku, Ikadayama, Nishinomiya, Japan 

jCasbeer, Sybil Mississippi San Fernando, Pampanga, Philippines 

Cavett, Maurine Iowa-Des Moines Kingswood School, Kalaw, S.S.S., Burma 

fChain, Beverly Ohio Instituto Metodista, Caixa 12681, Santa Amaro, S. P. Brazil 

fChamberlain, Addie K New Jersey Keimei Girls' School, Kobe, Japan 

Chapman, Virginia Florida Baguanos, Cuba 

Cheney, Alice Iowa-Des Moines 69 Shoto Cho, Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan 

Chevrin, Laura, R.N France Methodist Mission, Les Aiglons, El Biar (Algiers) 

Algeria, North Africa 

Clancy, Kathleen Rock River 5 Peirce Road, Penang, Malaya 

flClark, Mary Helen North Georgia Colegio Americano, Rua Dr. Lauro de Oliveira 71, 

Porto Alegre, Brazil 

Clarke, Elizabeth J West Wisconsin Interboard House, 4 of 12 Shiba Koen, Minato-ku, 

Tokyo, Japan 

tClark, M. Patricia Ohio Kingswood School, Kalaw, S.S.S., Burma 

ItClay, lone Central Texas Box 724, Dublin, Texas 

*Cole, Marion R Newark Kenyon Cottage, 4 Kampur Rd., Ipoh, Perak, Malaya 

Coleman, L. Maxine North Indiana Ellen T. Cowen Memorial Hospital, Kolar, 

Mysore State, India 

Collins, Irma D West Oklahoma. .Ushagram Girls' High School, Ushagram, Asansol, India 

Colony, Lucile Iowa-Des Moines 150 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

Comstock, Joy E Erie Nursery Training School, 2 Ritherdon Rd., Vepery, 

Madras, India 

Conner, Iva Central Kansas Apartado 446, Monterrey, N. L., Mexico 

Conrow, Marion L Central Kansas. .Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

Cook, E. Eulalia South Carolina Union Theological Seminary, Apartado 149, 

Matanzas, Cuba 

Cooley, Thelma Indiana Student Hostel, Castilla 248, Sucre, Bolivia 

Cooper, S. Kate North Georgia Methodist Mission, 2 Ku, 318 Taehung Dong 

Taejon, Korea 

*Corfield, Bertha May New England Woman's Christian College, Madras, India 

^Corner, S. Marie Pacific Northwest 5545 27th Ave. N. E., Seattle 5, Washington 

Cowan, Celia Idaho Box 522, Elisabethville, Congo Beige, Africa 

*Cox, Ruth Marie Central Kansas Adams Girls' High School, Almora, U. P., India 

Coy, Martha May Ohio Methodist Mission, Hissar, E. Punjab, India 

ffCraig, Jean F Virginia 3517 Grove Ave., Richmond, Virginia 

Crandall, Violet Southern California-Arizona Caixa 9, Malange, Quessua, Angola, 

West Africa 

tCrane, Kathleen Southwest Missouri Methodist Mission, P.O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan 

Moon, Seoul, Korea 

Crawford, Janette Texas... Lai Bagh Girls' Higher Secondary School, Lucknow U. P., India 

Crooks, F. Jane North-East Ohio Box 522, Elisabethville, Belgian Congo, Africa 

Croskrey, Dorothy Montana 42 Nishi Yohane cho, Fukuoka shi, Japan 

llCulley, Frances E., R.N Genesee Rochester Methodist Home, 666 East Ave., Rochester 7, 

tCurry, Mary Jane Pacific Northwest M.M.C.C., Lodja, Congo Beige, Africa 

Curry, Olive Pittsburgh Kwassui Junior College, Nagasaki, Japan 

Dail. Lucy Holston 69 Shoto Cho, Shibuya Ku, Tokyo, Japan 

Naniels, Ruth Kansas Baldwin Girls' High School, Bangalore, India 

Davidson, Lois M Southern Illinois Union Theological Seminary, Apartado 149, 

_ Matanzas, Cuba 

Dawsey, Sarah South Carolina Colegio Bennett, Marques de Abrantes 55, 

♦t-v ,-., , m „ Rio de Janeiro, Brazit 

Dean, Chlo ra T., R.N West Virginia Box 91, White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia 

Key: tPre-retirement. ffLeave of Absence. tSpecial Term. *On Furlough. 



34 

Name Conference Address 

Deavours, Anne South Georgia General Teran, N. L., Mexico 

Denieon, Alice Central Texas Colegio Centenario, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, 

Brazil 

tDenney, Helen Indiana Colegio Isabela Hendrix, Belo Horizonte, Brazil 

Derby, Marian L Troy 150 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

Desjardins, Helen Detroit 7 Mount Sophia, Singapore, Malaya 

DeVries, Evelyn Oregon African Girls' Hostel, Umtali, Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

*Dewar, Fannie E., R.N Florida Medical Center, Kapit, Sarawak, Borneo 

Deyo, V. Marguerite Rock River P. B. Umtali, Mutambara, Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Dickhaut, Olivia, R.N Indiana Sanatorio Palmore, Chihuahua, Mexico 

Dimmitt, Marjorie A Illinois Isabella Thoburn College, Lucknow, U. P., India 

Dingle, Leila V North Dakota-Pacific Northwest Box 1174, Manila, Philippines 

♦Dirksen, Mechteld, R.N New York East 3 Museum Rd., Taiping, Malaya 

Donahue, Katherine Mamie Philadelphia Colegio Eliza Bowman, Apartado 66, Cienfuegos, Cuba 

Doyle, Gladys B Colorado Methodist Mission, Moradabad, U. P., India 

Doyle, Letah M Nebraska "Rokeby," Landour, Mussoorie, U. P., India 

*Dyck, Anna Belle South Carolina Apartado 446, Monterrey, N. L., Mexico 

flDyer, Nellie North Arkansas 321 W. 17th St., North Little Rock, Ark. 

Eads, Mary Elizabeth Kentucky Interboard House 4 of 12, Shiba Koen, Minato ku, 

Tokyo, Japan 

Earnest, Elizabeth Holston Colegio Irene Toland, Matanzas, Cuba 

Ebersole, Stella Ohio 242-A Creek Street, Rangoon, Burma 

Eide, Mary L Iowa-Des Moines 7 Phayre Rd., Poona, B. S., India 

tElswick, F. Imogene West Virginia Centro Universitario K y 25, Vedado, Havana, Cuba 

fEnglish, F. Carroll Florida Colegio Buenavista, Apartado No. 5, Marianao, 

Havana, Cuba 

Eriksen, Alma, R.N Rock River Methodist Mission, Kampong Koh Road, Sitiawan, 

Perak, Malaya 

flEvans, E. Florence, R.N Southern California-Arizona 221 Madeline Dr., Monrovia, Calif. 

■fEvans, Janet M Central Alabama Lima High School, Apartado 2144, Lima, Peru 

Eveland, Ruth Iowa-Des Moines Methodist Mission, Pakur, Bihar, S. P., India 

Eye, Kathryn, R.N Baltimore M.M.C.C. Tunda (via Lusambo), Congo Beige, Africa 

Fairbanks, Elizabeth Virginia Methodist Mission, Godhra, Panch Mahals, India 

Farrar, Verda St. Louis Colegio Isabela Hendrix, Belo Horizonte, Brazil 

Feely, Gertrude Missouri Christian Youth Center, Mikage Cho, Higashi Nada 

Ku, Kobe, Japan 

ffFehr, Helen E Indiana 1302 Woodlawn Ave., Indianapolis, Indiana 

Felchlia, Irma Southern Illinois Calcutta Girls' High School, 152 Dharamtala St., 

Calcutta, India 

Fernandez, Sara E Florida Omaja, Cuba 

Ferris, Helen Southern California-Arizona Kinnaird College for Women, 

Lahore, Pakistan 

*Finch, Mary D Virginia Hiroshima Jo Gakuin, 49 Kami Nagarekawa Cho, 

Hiroshima 6hi, Japan 

Finke, Lois A Iowa-Des Moines Crandon Institute, Casilla de Correa, 445, 

Montevideo, Uruguay 
Fitzpatrick, Mary L Tennessee Apartado 26203, Mexico City, Mexico 

*Ford, Florence R Pittsburgh... Colegio Centenario, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil 

*Foster, Lorena, R.N Southwest Texas Sanatorio Palmore, Chihuahua, Mexico 

Foster, Mary C New York East Tokiwaso, Apt. 24 Hanazawacho, Shibago, 

Tokyo, Japan 
French, Clara M Northern New York 150 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

jFritz, Rosalie J Iowa-Des Moines 3 Museum Rd., Taiping, Malaya 

fFuhs, Doretta South Dakota Colegio Isabela Hendrix, Belo Horizonte, Brazil 

Fulton, Frances S Philadelphia Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

tFurbush, Mary Ellen Central New York 115 Rue Perreguax, Constantine, Algeria, N. Africa 

*Gaby, Frances Central Texas Herradura, Pinar del Rio, Cuba 

Gallagher, Hannah North-East Ohio Nadiad, Mission Road, Kaira District, India 

tGallivan, Claribell Lou Missouri Apartado 105 Jovellanos, Santa Rosa, Cuba 

Games, Mary Helen Ohio Apartado 2144, Lima, Peru 

tGeiger, Janette Ortha .Kentucky Box 522, Elisabethville, Belgian Congo, Africa 

Gibson, Clara Pacific Northwest Apartado 157, Puebla, Pue., Mexico 

•Gilbert, Dorothy, R.N Wyoming M. M. C. C, Wembo Nyama (via Lusambo), 

Belgian Congo, Africa 

Giles, S. Rebecca Illinois 64 Suginami-cho, Hakodate, Japan 

Gilmore, F. Colleen Mississippi 17 Boulevard Rd., Delhi, India 

♦Gish, Ruth B Illinois 22 Club Back Rd., Byculla, Bombay, India 

Gisler, Emmy, R.N Switzerland Les Aiglons, El Biar (Algiers), Algeria, North Africa 

Givens, Anna Louisiana 69 Shoto Cho, Shibuya Ku, Tokyo, Japan 

Givin, Olive I Philadelphia Apartado 50, Chihuahua, Mexico 

Gledhill, Vivian Ethel, R.N New York East. .Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

Goff, Maude Peninsula Methodist Mission, 42 Chang Young Dong, Inchon, Korea 

Gordon, Mary V., R.N Illinois Clara Swain Hospital, Bareilly, U. P., India 

*Graf, Martha North-East Ohio Methodist Church, Sibu, Sarawak, Borneo 

Grams, Hildegard Germany Warne Baby Fold, Bareilly, U. P., India 

flGress, Ruth A Baltimore 1760 G. Filbert St., San Francisco 23, Calif. 

*Greve, Ella M North Iowa Apartado 240, Callao, Peru 

{Griffin, Alta I., R.N Detroit 133 Alexander St., Caro, Michigan 

Gruber, Miriam Virginia Shellabear Hall, 440-B Tranquerah Rd., Malacca, Malaya 



Key: IPre-retirement. fiLeave of Absence. tSpecial Term. *On Furlough. 



Foreign Missionaries — Active 35 

Name Conference Address 

Guess, B. Loriiie Holston M.M.C.C, Wembo Nyama, via Lusambo, 

Belgian Congo, Africa 

Hackler, Frances Central Texas P.B. 636, E. Salisbury, Nyadiri, 

Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Hackman, A. Christine Philadelphia Apartado 2144, Lima, Peru 

Hahne, Jane Pittsburgh Lima High School, Apartado 2144, Lima, Peru 

Hall, Pearl L., R.N Virginia Sanatorio Palmore, Chihuahua, Mexico 

'Hammond, Thelma L Indiana Bayombong, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

♦ Hansing, Ovidia West Wisconsin c/o Mrs. W. J. Webb, 642 Haight Ave., 

Alameda, California 

"Harder, Ann L California Methodist Girls' School, 5 Pierce Road, Penang, Malaya 

Hare, Naomi May Northwest Texas Apartado 446, Monterrey, N. L., Mexico 

tHarmon, F. Marlene Western North Carolina Box 522 Elisabethville, Congo Beige, Africa 

JlHarris, Anita Central New York 150 Fifth Avenue, New York 11, N. Y. 

IIHarris, Ruth Myrl Nebraska 257 Fourth Avenue, New York 10, N. Y. 

Hart, Earline Mississippi 163 B/3 P.E.C.H.S., Karachi, Pakistan 

Hartman, Barbara Louise Philadelphia M.M.C.C, Minga (via Lusambo), Congo Beige, Africa 

Hartman, Doris Ohio Keimei Girls School, Kobe, Japan 

Hervold, Signhild Norway P. B. P. 24, Umtali, Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

*Hess, Doris Central Pennsylvania P.O. Box 756, Manila, Philippines 

Hesselgesser, Irene Detroit Colegio Piracicabano, Piracicaba, Brazil 

tHickok, Dorothy Mae Central New York ..Mutambara Mission, Mutambara, 

Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

jHighbaugh, Irma Kansas 150 Fifth Avenue, New York 10, N. Y. 

Hill, E. Marie, R.N Illinois... Methodist Mission, Ganta (via Monrovia), Liberia, W. Africa 

Hill, I. Joyce Northwest Texas Colegio Eliza Bowman, Cienfuegos, Cuba 

Hindley, Frances, R.N North-East Ohio Nur Manzil Psychiatric Center, 

Lucknow, U. P. India 

t Hinds, Marcia J Northwest Texas Luanda Caixa 68, Angola, West Africa 

Hitchcock, Alice L., R.N North Indiana Tsuyazaki Minakata-gun, Fukuoka Ken, Japan 

JHobart, Elizabeth Southern Illinois 651 Foster St., Evanston, Illinois 

Hobson, Ruby, R.N Pacific Northwest Ellen T. Cowen Memorial Hospital, 

Kolar, Mysore State, India 

Hodgson, Helen M California Apartado 446, Monterrey, N. L., Mexico 

Holder, M. L. Edna Oregon Methodist Mission, Puntamba, Bombay State, India 

Hollows, Bessie New Hampshire Lai Bagh Methodist Church, Lucknow, U. P., India 

JHolmes, M. Marion New York Box 195, 7 Hill Street, Alfred, N. Y. 

Homfeldt, Ethel Central Kansas M.M.C.C., W T embo Nyama (via Lusambo), 

Congo Beige, Africa 

Honnell, Grace Kansas Sitapur Boys' School, Sitapur, U. P. India 

Howard, A. Clara South Georgia Methodist Mission, 2 Ku, 318 Taehung Dong 

Taejon, Korea 

Howell, Elizabeth M Florida Fukuoka Jo Gakuin, Fukuoka, Japan 

Hubbard, Dorothy R Mississippi Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

HHuibregtse, Minnie North Iowa 701 Milwaukee St., Charles City, Iowa 

tHuitema, Wemelina, M.D Southwest Texas Ellen T. Cowen Memorial Hospital, 

Kolar, Mysore State, India 

Hulbert, Esther L North-East Ohio Colegio Eliza Bowman, Cienfuegos, Cuba 

Hunt, Ava F Rock River 624 Cortea, Vista, Calif. 

Hutchens, Edna May Wisconsin Lai Bagh Girls' Higher Secondary School, 

Lucknow, U. P., India 

tJackson, Beverly West Wisconsin Bayombong, Muenueva, Vizcaya, Philippines 

Jenkins, Rosalie Peninsula Predio Jahu Apartmento 304, Largo da Polvora 96, 

Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Jensen, Tove, R.N Denmark.. Methodist Mission, Kapanga, Sac Prive (via Elisabethville), 

Congo Beige, Africa 

Johannaber, Elizabeth Nebraska 431 Paredes Box 1600, Manila, Philippines 

Johansson, Margit, R.N Finland P. B. 636 E. Salisbury, Nyadiri, Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

H Johnson, Frances Southern California-Arizona 6315 King Ave., Bell, Calif. 

tJohnston, Margaret V Detroit Madar Union Sanatorium, Ajmer, India 

fJones, A. Ruth Central Texas M. M. C. C, Lodja, Congo Beige, Africa 

Jones, Mary Frances Central New York 49 Kaminagare Kawa cho, Hiroshima, Japan 

Jones, Mrs. Pearl Willis, R.N Baltimore... Nyadiri, P. B. 636, E. Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Jonsson, Karin Syster, R.N Sweden Box 41, Inhambane, Portuguese East Africa 

t Jordan, V. Wynell Alabama 163 B/3 P. E. C. H. S., Karachi, Pakistan 

Justin, Catherine L Kansas Holman Institute, Agra, U. P., India 

Kelly, Juanita North Georgia Colegio Irene Toland, Matanzas, Cuba 

Kelly, K. Lorena Western North Carolina M. M. C. C. Lodja, Congo Beige, Africa 

Killingsworth, M. Louise North Mississippi 3 Museum Rd., Taiping, Malaya 

Killingsworth, Mathilde Mississippi Box 483, Singapore 9, Malaya 

King, Sarah N Southern California-Arizona Nyadiri Girls' School, P. B. 636, 

E. Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Kingsley, Marian E., R.N Genesee Methodist Mission, Kang Neung, Korea 

Kleiner, Clara, R.N North Iowa 22 Club Back Road, Byculla, Bombay, India 

Klepper, Madaleine West Oklahoma Methodist Social Center, 431 Paredes, 

Manila, Philippines 

Klingeberger, Ida Martha Kansas Methodist Mission, Khandwa, M. P., India 

11 Knapp, Lena C New York East Apt. 48, 135 W. 16th St., New York 4, N. Y. 

*Koch, Alverna M North-East Ohio Casillade Correo 445, Montevideo, Uruguay 

tKoch, Joyoe E., R.N Illinois Kwassui Girls' School, 12 Higashiyamate, Nagasaki, Japan 

HKoether, Luella G North Iowa Riceville, Iowa 

Key: J Pre -retirement. U Leave of Absence. tSpecial Term. *On Furlough. 



36 

Name Conference Address 

Kriz, Josephine Pittsburgh Methodist Mission, Tandur, Deccan, India 

Kurtz, Barbara Central Kansas Rua Joauqaim Antonio de Aquair- 33, 30, E. 

Lisbon, Portugal 

Kutz, Semeramis C North Indiana El Vergel, Angol, Chile 

Lacy, Edith J., M.D Virginia Methodist Mission, Puntamba, Ahinednagar Dist., India 

Laird, Esther, R.N Ohio Methodist Mission, 2 ku, 318 Taehung Dong, Taejon, Korea 

Landon, S. Louise, R.N Rock River Landour Community Hospital, Landour, Mussourie, 

U. P., India 

Lane, Ortha May North Iowa c/o Rev. E. Knettler, House 21, Lane 42, Ren Ai Rd., 

Section 2, Taipei, Taiwan 

Lang, Victoria C, R. N North Indiana Caixa 41, Inhambane, Portuguese, East Africa 

Larsen, Jenny H., R.N Norway P. B. 636, E. Salisbury, Nyadiri, Southern 

Rhodesia, Africa 

Larsen, Liv Norway Les Aiglons, El-Biar (Algiers), Algeria, North Africa 

LaRue, Eunice, R.N North-East Ohio Crawford Hospital, Vikarabad, Deccan, India 

Lawrence, Ruth Alabama 150 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

Leavitt, Ollie R Texas Shanti Sadan Hostel, Gulbarga, Deccan, India 

fiLefforge, Roxy .North Indiana Huntington College, Huntington, Ind. 

tLewis, Charlotte Florida Caixa Postal 41, Inhambane, Portuguese, East Africa 

Lind, Jennie Pittsburgh Fukuoka Jo Gakuin, Minami Yakuin, Fukuoka, Japan 

Lind, Ruth H., R.N Sweden P. B. 292, Umtali, Mutambara, Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Lochhead, Marjorie Scotland 39 Avenue des Felibres, Tunis Tunisia, North Africa 

Logue, Eva K., R.N Baltimore Health Dispensary, Yellari, Yadgiri District, India 

Loomia, Helen New York 272 Ampang Rd., Kuala Lumpur, Malaya 

Lorah, Louneta Wyoming 124 Maita Machi, Minami ku, Yokohama, Japan 

Lorah, Mabel Wyoming Apartado 2144, Lima, Peru 

Lorenz, Theresa, R.N Texas Mission Road, Kaira District, Nadiad, India 

Maiden, Margaret L Montana 124 Maita Machi, Minami ku, Yokohama, Japan 

Major, Frances South Carolina 130 Dharamtala St., Calcutta 13, India 

Malloy, Agnes South Georgia Colegio Buenvista, Marianao No. 5, Havana, Cuba 

flManly, Marian E., M.D Ohio 2145 Hillside Ave., Walnut Creek, Calif. 

Mann, Una J West Oklahoma Adams Girls' High School, Almora, U. P., India 

Mansfield, Marietta Louisiana Methodist Mission, Bijnor, U. P., India 

Manz, Helene, R.N Switzerland Mission Methodiste, Les Quadhias, Algeria, North Africa 

*Martin, Edith North Arkansas M. M. C. C, Methodist Mission, Tunda 

(via Lusambo), Congo Beige, Africa 

tMasten, Mrs. Sallie B North Carolina 751 Vermont St., Malate, Manila, Philippines 

Mathys, Marcella North Indiana Escuela de Idiomas, Apartado 2240, 

San Jose, Costa Rica 

tMatthews, Bobbie Mae Texas Escuela de Idiomas, Apartado 157, Puebla, Pue., Mexico 

Maw, Thelma B Southern California- Arizona Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, 

Kwang Hwan Moon, Seoul, Korea 

Mayer, Margery Ohio 224 Yamashita Cho, Kagoshima Shi, Kagoshima Ken, Japan 

Mayes, Susie North Georgia Methodist Mission, Sibu, Sarawak 

"McCain, Pearle North Arkansas Seiwa Joshi Gakuin, Okadayama, 

Nishinomiya Shi, Japan 

McCall, Meriel, R.N Pacific Northwest P. O. Gajadharganj, Buxar, Bihar, India 

McCutchen, Martha Northwest Indiana Methodist Mission, Sibu, Sarawak, Borneo 

McKay, Florence Ross Erie Methodist Mission, Mulungwishi, Sac Prive, Elisabethville 

Congo Beige, Africa 

McKimmey, Orlene T Little Rock Mariano Escobedo 291, Colonia Anahuac, D. F., Mexico 

HMcKinney, Ruth E Wyoming Lake Ariel, Pennsylvania 

McLain, Lulu Marie Alabama. .Keimei Girls' School, 35 Nakomate-dori, 4 Chome, Ikutu-ku, 

Kobe, Japan 

McMillan, Mary Alabama Hiroshima Jogakuin, Ushita Machi, Hiroshima, Japan 

tMcMurray, Donna Jane Erie Colegio Americano, Rua Dr. Laura de Oliviera 71, 

Porto Alegre, Brazil 

*McSwain, Mary B Little Rock Rua Rivadavia Correa 188, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

Meek Martha Baltimore 69 Shoto cho, Shibuya Ku, Tokyo, Japan 

Meier, Opal L Central Texas Apartado 2144, Lima, Peru 

*Mercer, Evelyn Kansas Methodist Mission, Kampong Koh, (N-134), Sitiawan, 

Perak, Malaya 

Michel, Mabel North Indiana Box 41, Inhambane, Portuguese, East Africa 

Miller, Alpha J Ohio Caixa 9, Malange, Quessua, Angola, West Africa 

tMiller, M. Jane Illinois Colegio Americano, Avenue Pellegrini 1352, Rosario, Argentina 

Mitchell, A. Mabel Southwest Missouri Elkund Heights, Raub, Pahang, Malaya 

*Moe, Carol Nebraska Box 76, Vigan, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

tMontgomery, Lillian Peninsula P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, Seoul, Korea 

Montgomery, Thelma North-East Ohio Methodist Mission, Kapanga, Sac Prive (via 

Elisabethville), Belgian Congo, Africa 

Moore, Helen Troy Kwassui Junior College, Nagasaki, Japan 

Moore, Sadie Maude South Georgia. .Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

Morris, Harriett Central Kansas Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, 

Kwang Hwan Moon, Seoul, Korea 

Morris, M. Geneva Holston 11 Konno cho, Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan 

Moss, Barbara, M.D Troy 237 Yul Mok Dong, Inchon, Korea 

*Munkejord, Maria Randi, R.N. ...Norway Creighton-Freeman Hospital, Vrindaban, U. P., India 

Naess, Bjorg L., R.N Norway Theodori Mission, Mahespur Raj, S. P., Bihar, India 

*Nagler, Etha M Michigan 6 Humphrey's Avenue, Kowlon, Hong Kong 

Narbeth, E. Gwendoline Philadelphia 39 Rue Tertian, Constantine, Algeria, North Africa 

*Neal, Mattie Lou Texas Colegio Eliza Bowman, Cienfuegos, Cuba 

Nelson, Ada May Indiana Methodist Girls' School, Talegaon, Dabhade 

Poona District, India 



Key: JPre-retirement. flLeave of Absence. tSpecial Term. "On Furlough. 



Foreign Missionaries — Active 37 

Name Conference Address 

Nelson, Dorothy M Minnesota Casilla de Correo 445, Montevideo, Uruguay 

Nelson, Maude V., R.N Texas Warne Baby Fold, Bareilly, U. P., India 

tNelson, Ruth E Illinois 64 Suginami Cho, Hakodate-shi, Hokkaido, Japan 

Nixon, M. Irene Central Texas Apartado 50, Chihuahua, Chih, Mexico 

Norris, Kathleen A., R.N Genesee Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore, 

N. Arcot Dist., India 

Northcott, Ruth E Rock River Box 41, Inhambane, Portuguese, East Africa 

JNowlin, Mabel Kansas 3418 Arlington St., Kansas City 29, Missouri 

Nutting, Clara, M.D New England Nyadiri, P. B. 636, E. Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia, 

Africa 

Oberlin, Gladys M Baltimore Instituto Ana Gonzaga, Av. Cesario de Melo 2797 

Inhoaila, D. F., Rio de Janerio, Brazil 

Oldridge, Mary Belle East Oklahoma c/oWoman's Dormitory 707, Mure, Mitaka, 

Tokyo, Japan 

Oliver, Bessie O South Georgia Methodist Mission, 2 Ku, 318 Taehung Dong, 

Taejon, Korea 

O'Neal, Dorothy, R.N West Virginia M. M. C. C. Minga, (via Lusambo), 

Belgian Congo, Africa 

*0'Toole, Ruth A., R.N St. Louis M. M. C. C. Minga, (via Lusambo), Congo Beige, Africa 

Otto, Grace Detroit Mutambara Mission, P. B., Umtali, 

Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Otto, Vivian L Detroit Old Umtali Mission, P. B. P. 24, Umtali, 

Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Overby, Elizabeth, R.N Baltimore ..Methodist Mission, Mission Rd., Nadiad, Kaira District, 

India 

Overholt, Treva B Michigan Lima High School, Apartado 2144, Lima, Peru 

*Paine, Mildred A Genesee 1035 1 Chome, Motoki, Adachi-Ku, Tokyo, Japan 

Palm, Emma M., R.N Ohio Methodist Mission, Sibu, Sarawak, Borneo 

Palmer, Florence K Illinois Webb Memorial Girls' School, Baroda Residency, India 

*Palmer, Pearl New York Methodist Mission, Bulandshahr, U. P., India 

Parham, M. Catherine North Georgia Box 522, Elisabethville, Congo Beige, Africa 

Parker, Elsie North Carolina. . .Instituto Central Do Povo, Rua Rivadavia Correa 188, 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

Parks, Dorothy Ruth Holston Methodist Mission, N. 134, Kampong Koh, 

Sitiawan, Perak, Malava 

tParks, Edith H Illinois Old Umtali, P. B. 24, Umtali, Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Parks, Vera E North Indiana 152 Dharamtala St., Calcutta, India 

fParrott, Rae Beth Texas.. Hiroshima Jo Gakuin, 49 Kaminagarekawa cho, Hiroshima, Japan 

*Parsons, L. Maude Philadelphia 9 Naka Kawarage Cho, Hirosaki, Aomori Ken, Japan 

tPatterson, Barbara Washington College of West Africa, Monrovia, Liberia, West Africa 

H Peat, Carrie Washington 1539 Appleton St., Baltimore 17, Md. 

Peavy, Anne R South Georgia Seiwa Joshi Gakuin, Okadayama, Nishinomiya Shi, 

Hyogo Prefecture, Japan 

Peckham, Caroline S Wisconsin Kwassui Junior College, Nagasaki, Japan 

Penn, Betty Ohio Methodist Girls' School, Pauri, Garhwal District, U. P., India 

tPennington, H. Nathalee Tennessee Crandon Institute, Casilla de Correa 445, Montevideo, 

Uruguay 

Perry, Ella L Central New York 17 Boulevard Rd., Delhi, India 

Pfaff, Emma Lois North Dakota Old Umtali, Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Pfaff, Jessie A North Dakota Old Umtali, P. B. P. 24, Umtali, Southern Rhodesia, 

Africa 

ffPiper, Florence R., R.N Newark 60 Oneida Avenue, Dumont, New Jersey 

tPlatt, Carol. Kansas Casilla de Correo 445, Montevideo, Uruguay 

Porter, Eunice, R.N Colorado Creighton-Freeman Memorial Hospital, Vrindaban, U. P., 

India 

Precise, A. E. Pearl West Oklahoma Mission Rd., Nadiad, Kaira District, India 

Precise, Myrtle, R.N West Oklahoma School of Nursing, Nadiad, Kaira District, India 

Prentice, Margaret, R.N Colorado Ganta (via Monrovia), Liberia, West Africa 

Proctor, Orvia A Southwest Missouri 57 Signal Pagoda Rd., Rangoon, Burma 

fRaak, Muriel C Iowa-Des Moines Hostel for Girls, College of West Africa, 

Monrovia Liberia, West Africa 

tRagsdale, Gertrude Ann Virginia Casilla 69, Nueva, Imperial, Chile 

Ratliff, Olive, R.N West Virginia Methodist Mission, 2 Ku, 315 Taehung Dong, 

Taejon, Korea 

Rawls, Lula D., R.N Florida Sanatorio Palmore, Chihuahua, Mexico 

* Reed, Gloria Jean .North-East Ohio 64 Suginami, Hakodate, Japan 

tReed, Maud L Texas Box 522, Elisabethville, Belgian Congo, Africa 

Rees, E. Dorothy Kentucky M. M. C. C. Katako Kombe, Belgian Congo, Africa 

fRegister, E. Kathleen Florida c/o Kensuke Matamo, 101 Tokiwamatsu cho Shibuya ku, 

Tokyo, Japan 

Reik, Elsie I Wisconsin Kinnaird College for Women, Lahore, Pakistan 

Reinecke, Sarah Baltimore M. M. C. C. Lodja, Congo Beige, Africa 

JReitz, Beulah Kansas 853 Barnett Ave., Kansas City, Kansas 

IRexroth, Emma Pacific Northwest. .R. F. D. No. 1, Box 10 Sedro Woolley, Washington 

t Reynolds, Selma Southwest Texas. .Centro Social Roberts, Victoria 307, Saltillo, Mexico 

Rice, G. Roberta, M.D Nebraska Methodist Mission, P. O., Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

Richardson, Faithe Nebraska Central Cristiano, Apartado 50, Chihuahua, Mexico 

Richardson, Patricia Rock River Colegio Americano, Avenue Pellegrini 1352, 

Rosario, Argentina 

tRiddell, Patricia Southern California Escuela de Idiomas, Apartado 2240, 

San Jose, Costa Rica 
Rippey, Hazel Missouri 3 Nishi Nopporo, Ebetsu Ise, Hokkaido, Japan 

Key: JPre-retirement. flLeave of Absence. tSpecial Term. *On Furlough. 



38 

Name Conference Addbess 

Robbins, A. Adis Indiana Rasra, U. P., (Ballia District), India 

tRoberts, Wilma Minnesota Colegio Centario, Santa Maria, Brazil 

Robinett, Gusta A North Indiana Djalan, Bulan 28, Medan, Sumatra 

Robinson, (Mrs.) ArDelia M South Georgia Methodist Mission, Aligarh, U. P., India 

Robinson, Mary Sue North Mississippi 115 Rue Perregaux, Constantine, Algeria, 

North Africa 

Robken, D. Norene Little Rock M. M. C. C. Wembo Nyama (via Lusambo), 

Congo Beige, Africa 

tRodes, Sara P Tennessee 124 Iogi Sanchome, Suginami ku, Tokyo, Japan 

Rogers, Betty Jane North Mississippi San Mateo, Isabella, Philippines 

Rosser, M. Helen, R.N South Georgia Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 112, Pusan, Korea 

Rowland, M. Elston, R.N Baltimore Methodist Church, P. O. Box 734, Manila, Philippines 

Russell, Esther Joyce Wyoming Old TJmtali Mission, P. B. 24, Umtali, 

Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Russell, Mary Katharine North Indiana. . .College of West Africa, Monrovia, Liberia, West Africa 

IJSadler, Eva M., R.N Wyoming 90 Lake Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Saladin, Louise Switzerland Methodist Mission, Raichur, Deccan, India 

Salzer, Florence Minnesota Isabella Thoburn College, Lucknow, U. P., India 

Sandfort, Dorothy A Nebraska Apartado 2144, Lima, Peru 

tSawyer, Mildred M Arizona Old Umtali, P. B., 24, Umtali, Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Schaefer, Carolyn E West Oklahoma Methodist Mission, Mathura, U. P., India 

Schleman, Laura M North-East Ohio Methodist Girls' School, 12 Young Rd. r 

Kuala Lumpur, Malaya 

Schmidt, Dora Z Central Kansas Washington 208 Ote., Monterrey, Mexico 

Schwab, Elsa Germany Hirata-cho, 12-4, Katagihara, Ukyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan 

Scovill, Ila May Ohio Myakatsapa, P. O. Watsomba (via Umtali), 

Southern Rhodesia 

Seal, May Bell Tennessee Calle 12 No. 1630, Chihuahua, Chih, Mexico 

Searcy, Mary Missouri 11 Konno cho Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan 

Seeck, Margaret Nebraska 5 Pierce Rd., Penang, Malaya 

Selvey, Esther West Virginia Aikei Gakuen, 1035-1 Motoki cho, Adachi ku, 

Tokyo, Japan 

Shanks, Leora West Oklahoma Apartado 105, Jovellanos, Cuba 

Shaw, Marian B., R.N Detroit Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

Shelby, Martha New Mexico Methodist Mission, Pithoragarh, U. P., India 

Sheldon, Mabel M Wyoming Gajadharganj P. O., Buxar, Bihar, India 

Shepherd, F. Mildred Louisville 960 Civil Lines, Plested Memorial Girls' School, 

Meerut, U. P., India 

fShine, Chasteen E North Carolina. .Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

Shoemaker, Esther, M.D Philadelphia Ellen T. Cowen Memorial Hospital, Kolar 

Mysore State, India 

Sibert, D. Carol, R.N North-East Ohio Fairfield, Belgaum, Bombay State, India 

Simester, Edith Ohio Methodist Mission, 137-5 Sun Wha Dong, 

Taejon, Korea 

Sluyter, Eunice Peninsula 37 Cantonment Road, Lucknow, U. P. India 

Small, Shirley Detroit Apartado 2240, San Jose, Costa Rica 

tSmith, Barbara Anne North Carolina Colegio Buenavista, Apartado No., 5, Marianao 

Havana, Cuba 

*Smith, Florence Wyoming 7 Mt. Sophia, Singapore, Malaya 

tSmith, Myrtle A Detroit 150 Fifth Avenue, New York 11, N. Y. 

tSnead, Betty Jean Florida Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

Sorensen, Borghild, R.N Norway Creighton-Freeman Memorial Hospital, Vrindaban, U. P., 

India 

tSowers, Audrey Jane Baltimore Laura Temple Hostel, Mariana Escobedo 291, 

Calonia Anahuac, Mexico City, Mexico 

jSpradling, Grace Kentucky Lima High School, Apartado 2144, Lima, Peru 

tSprague, Mary Lou Central Kansas Caixa 9, Quessua, Malange, Angola, North Africa 

*Stahley, Wanda Little Rock Mission Rd., Nadiad, Kaira District, India 

flStallard, Eleanor Bell, R.N Southern California-Arizona 275 Robincroft Drive, Pasadena, Calif. 

Stephens, (Mrs.) Eunice B North Iowa Medical Mission House, Kupandal, Kathmandu, Nepal 

..Stevens, Catherine B North Mississippi 288 S. K St., Dinuba, Calif. 

*Stewart, Emma Northwest Indiana Ivy Towers, Lawrence Rd., Poona, India 

tStewart, Emma H Mississippi Rua Dr. Lauro de Oliveira 71, Porto Alegre, Brazil 

Stewart, Ruth G., R.N Northern New York. .. .Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan 

Moon, Seoul, Korea 

tStockton, Elsie L California-Nevada Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan 

Moon, Seoul, Korea 

tStoffer, Esther North-East Ohio P. O. Box 112, Pusan, Korea 

Strader, Evelyn M Western North Carolina. . . .Methodist High School, Kanpur, U. P., India 

Strong, Dorothy Baltimore Leonard Theological College, Jabalpur, M. P., India 

**Studley, Ellen M North Indiana 5408 Blackstone Ave., Chicago 15, 111. 

tStuntz, Jane Tennessee Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

Suffern, Ellen H Southern California-Arizona 12 Mt. Sophia, Singapore, Malaya 

flSurdam, T. Janet Genesee Riceville, Iowa 

fSwartz, Daphne I Rock River 1 Ramirez 7, Cortazar Gto, Mexico 

Sweeney, Ellen M Louisville P. O. Mutambara, Mutambara, Southern Rhodesia, 

Africa 

Swinney, (Mrs.) Irene T California-Nevada Methodist Mission, Kang Neung, Korea 

Swords, G. Lilly Newark Mission School, Batala, Punjab, India 



Key: IPre-retirement. fl Leave of Absence. tSpecial Term. *On Furlough. **Special Appointment 



Foreign Missionaries — Active 39 

Name Conference Address 

Tarr, M. Alberta Southwest Missouri Nishinoguchi Machi, Beppu, Kyushu, Japan 

Tarwater, Jean Cate, M.D Tennessee Ellen T. Cowen Memorial Hospital, Kolar, 

Mysore State, India 

Taylor, L. Mildred North Alabama Nyadiri, P. B. 636, E. Salisbury, 

Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Tennant, Elizabeth West Wisconsin Kwassui Girls' School, 2 Higashi, Yamate Machi, 

Nagasaki, Japan 

Tennant, Mary Jean Michigan Caixa 41, Inhambane, Portuguese, East Africa 

tTerry, Marilyn North Alabama Methodist Mission, 2 Ku, 318 TaeHung Dong, 

Taejon, Korea 

*Terry, Zula Texas Colegio Isabela Hendrix, Belo Horizonte, Brazil 

Tillou, Anna May Genesee Methodist Mission, Shahjahanpur, U. P., India 

ITirsgaard, Maren M Rock River Strandgade 19, Vejle, Denmark 

JTownsend, Mollie, R.N Wyoming 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

JTowson, Manie C South Carolina c/o Mr. Lambuth Towson, Dahlonega, Ga. 

Tubbs, Lulu Michigan Sunnyside Lisnacloon, P. O. Mutambara, 

Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Tucker, Margaret, M.D Ohio Christian Medical College, Ludhiana, Punjab, India 

Twinem, J. Marguerite Southern California-Arizona 150 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

Tyson, Dana Virginia Methodist Church, Lingayen, Pangasinan, Manila, 

Philippines 

fUlsh, Rosa M South Carolina M. M. C. C. Tunda (via Lusambo), 

Congo Beige, Africa 

flVan, Amber Dakota Apt. C, 220 North Morengo, Alhambra, Calif. 

Vanderberg, Martha New Jersey Apartado 2144, Lima, Peru 

fVanOoteghem, Simonne, R.N Belgium M. M. C. C. Wembo Nyama (via Lusambo), 

Congo Beige, Africa 

*Waldron, Rose California-Nevada 64 Suginami Cho, Hakodate, Japan 

Walker, Marion M Central Texas Methodist Dormitory, Tarlac City, Philippines 

Wallace, Lillian California-Nevada.. .Isabella Thoburn College, Lucknow, U. P., India 

Wallace, Margaret Minnesota Isabella Thoburn College, Lucknow, U. P., India 

tWare, Alberteen Central Wisconsin. . .Caixa Postal 9, Quessua Malange, Angola, Africa 

Warne, Eleanor Pacific Northwest Ehime Ken, Kita Uwa Gun, Hiromi Cho, 

Nishi NoNo, Japan 

*Warner, Marian North Iowa Training Institute for Women, Jabalpur, M. P., India 

Warner, Ruth V California-Nevada Sadi Carnot 73, Mexico City 4, Mexico 

Watson, Marylin Nebraska 11 Konno cho, Tokyo, Japan 

tWayland, Emma Nell North Arkansas. .Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

Weaver, Evelyn M North-East Ohio Ospring Bank Road, Muree, Pakistan 

Webb, Gladys M Indiana Methodist Mission, Budaun, U. P., India 

tWeber, M. Emilia Mississippi Apartado 157, Puebla Pue, Mexico 

Weems, Mrs. Euline S North Georgia.. Methodist Mission, P.O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

*Welles, Doris I Southern California- Arizona 130 Dharamtala St., Calcutta 14, India 

Wells, E. Irene New York East Calcutta Girls' High School, 152 Dharamtala St., 

Calcutta, India 

Wendle, Elsy Switzerland Methodist Mission, Les Aiglons El Biar (Algiers) 

Algeria, North Africa 

IWest, Nellie Maud St. Louis 831 Hale Ave., Edwardsville, Illinois 

Westrup. Charlotte, R.N Central Kansas Methodist Mission, Dangoli, Almora District 

U. P. India 

Whitaker, Faith California-Nevada Methodist Mission, P. O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan 

Moon, Seoul, Korea 

*White, Annimae .North Georgia A. P. CM. Mutoto via Luluabourg, Congo Beige, Africa 

Whitehead, Mabel North Alabama Seiwa Joshi Gakuin, Okadayama, Nishinomiya, Shi, 

Japan 

IWhiting, Ethel L Nebraska 150 5th Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

Whitney, Alice E., R.N Southern California-Arizona Old Umtali, P. B. P. 24, Umtali, 

Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

tWhyte, Elizabeth Ann Philadelphia Mission Methodiste, Mulungwishi, Sac Prive, 

Elisbethville, Congo Beige, Africa 

Wiggins, Mae Alabama Methodist High School, Kanpur, U. P., India 

*Williams, Laura .Baltimore Isabella Thoburn College, Lucknow, U. P., India 

U Williams, Mary E Kentucky Eastern State Teachers College, Richmond, Ky. 

JlWilliamson, Ethel South Carolina Darlington, S. C. 

Willingham, Pauline, R.N New Jersey Villa de Santiago, N. L., Mexico 

*Wilson, Emma Central Kansas. .Methodist Mission, P.O. Box 164, Kwang Hwan Moon, 

Seoul, Korea 

Winfrey, Annie Laura Texas A. P. C. M. Mutoto (via Luluabourg), 

Belgian Congo, Africa 

Winn, Mary South Carolina 15 Warris Rd., Lahore, Pakistan 

*Winslow, Hazel Iowa-Des Moines P. O. Box 410, 242 Creek St., Rangoon, Burma 

Wintringham, W. Jeanne Ohio 57 Signal Pagoda Rd., Rangoon, Burma 

Wolcott, Jessie North Iowa Djalan, Bulan 28, Medan, Sumatra, Indonesia 

Wolfe, Ruth S Philadelphia Kinnaird College for Women, Lahore, Pakistan 

Wolff, Marguerite Switzerland Kingsmead College, Selly Oak, Birmingham, England 

Woodruff, Patricia A New York Union Theological Seminary, Camacua 282, 

Buenos Aires, Argentina 

Woodward, Mary Virginia Colegio Eliza Bowman, Cienfuegos, Cuba 

Wright, Florence, R.N Genesee Mission Hospital, Bidar, Deccan, India 

Wright, Mildred Southwest Mississippi Methodist Mission, Kamalnagar, Bidar District 

Deccan, India 
*Zicafoose, Myrtle West Virginia.. M. M. C. C, Minga (via Lusambo), Congo Beige, Africa 

Key: JPre-retirement. flLeave of Absence. tSpecial Term. *On Furlough. 



40 



DEACONESSES IN ACTIVE SERVICE 



NAME APPOINTMENT ADDBESS 

Adams, Kate Rt. 4, Atkinson, Neb. 

Adams, Ruth E Vashti School Thomasville, Ga. 

Aldrich, Helen Q George O. Robinson School Santurce 34, Puerto Rico 

Alexander, Roberta J Five Point Mission 1175 Madison Ave., New York 28, N. Y. 

Allen, Eunice A Tacoma Community House 1311 S. M St., Tacoma 3, Wash". 

Almon, Martha Rural Work Box 675, Kaneohe, Oahu, Hawaii 

Anderson. Grace The Methodist Church Cambridge, Iowa 

Anderson, Verdie Wesley House Amherstdale, W. Va. 

Angell, Frances L Leave — health 956 Philadelphia St., Indiana, Pa. 

Amies, Doris L George O. Robinson School Santurce 34, Puerto Rico 

Arnold, Esther E St. John's of Hamilton 608 Cathedral St., Baltimore 1, Md. 

Arnold, Grace Muhlenberg Methodist Settlement R. 4, Central City, Ky. 

Arold, Lydia Bethany Deaconess Hospital 237 St. Nicholas Ave., Brooklyn 37, N. Y. 

Badgett, E. Grace Esther Hall 221 W. 9th St., Cincinnati 2, Ohio 

Baker, Ella B First Methodist Church 2352 Broadway, Oakland 12, Calif. 

Baker, Marie 314 W. 15th St., Auburn, Ind. 

Ballance, Ethelynde M Eastern North Carolina Rural Work Rt. 3, Rockingham, N. C. 

Ballou, Frances C First Methodist Church 3000 Bridge Ave., Cleveland 13, Ohio 

Bame, Fannie A Bethlehem Community Center 1336 Conklin Ave., Augusta, Ga. 

Banman, Anna K Robincroft Rest Home 275 Robineroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Barber, Cleo Wolff Settlement 2801 17th St., Tampa, Fla. 

Barnett, Ola Lee Allen High School 331 College St., Asheville, N. C. 

Barnwell, Mary Lou Board of Missions 150 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

Bartholomew, Ruth L Sabbatical leave P.B.P. 24 Umtali, Southern Rhodesia, Africa 

Bartruff , Pauline Bethesda Hospital Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Baxter, Edna M Hartford Seminary Foundation 55 Elizabeth St. , Hartford 5, Conn. 

Beall, Julia E Asbury College Wilmore, Ky. 

Bearnes, Frances Minnie Nay Settlement House 43 Marshall St., Benwood, W. Va. 

Bebermeyer, Martha A Spanish Work, Epworth Church 1642 Ogden St., Denver 18, Colo. 

Beck, Myrtle First Methodist Church 4903 Martin St., Lincoln 4, Neb. 

Beecher, Bertha E The Christ Hospital Cincinnati 19, Ohio 

Belz, Suzanne York Larger Parish York, Neb. 

Berkley, Ruby B Bethlehem Center 4410 Leland Ave., Dallas, Tex. 

Berry, Evelyn Paine College Augusta, Ga. 

Bess, Margaret C Mississippi Rural Center Box 229, Columbia, Miss. 

Bilger, M. Ida Bethlehem Center 1016 State St., Richmond, Va. 

Bland, M. Elizabeth Washington Street Methodist Church Columbia, S. C. 

Blaschko, Mary L Trinity Methodist Church 1506 E. 35th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Bloomer, Evelyn P Council of Churches Evansville, Ind. 

Bloomster, Doris E Bisti School and Community Center Box 877, Farmington, N. M. 

Blount, Beatrice Council of Churches 108 Mason St., Cincinnati 19, Ohio 

Bogardus, La Donna Board of Education Box K71, Nashville, Tenn. 

Bond, Mary Lou Bethlehem Center 749 Walker Ave., Memphis, Tenn. 

Bope, Mary L Wesley Community Center 2502 N. Akard St., Dallas, Tex. 

Bower, Gladice National College for Christian Workers 5123 Truman Road, 

Kansas City 27, Mo. 

Bowers, Betty E Delia C. Lamb Neighborhood House 702 Admiral Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. 

Bratton, A. Katherine Hamline Methodist Church 4825 16th St., N. W., Washington 11, D. C. 

Breeden, Evelyn J Delia C. Lamb Neighborhood House.. 702 Admiral Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. 

Brewer, Clara L Methodist Union Office 3348 Bonaparte Ave., Cincinnati 7, Ohio 

Bridwell, Mrs. Lois Y Leave — home duties 1825 E. Minnezona, Phoenix, Ariz. 

Brooks, Cynthia H Allen High School 331 College St., Asheville, N. C. 

Brooks, Margaret M Leave — home duties 220 11th Ave., Moline, 111. 

Brown, Darla Latin American Methodist Mission 2502 N. Akard St., Dallas, Tex. 

Bryan, Lulu B Neighborhood House 506 Fourth St., Calexico, Calif. 

Bucke, Martha R South Side Settlement House 72 S. Washington St., Columbus 15, Ohio 

Burch, Eva N Deaconess Children's Home 2120 Highland Ave., Everett, Wash. 

Burris, Emma G Board of Mssions 150 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

Butler, Rosa May Scarritt College for Christian Workers Nashville 5, Tenn. 

Cameron, Mary C Nellie Burge Community Center 1226 Clay St., Montgomery, Ala. 

Campbell, Barbara E Neidringhaus Memorial Methodist Church Box 8, Granite City, 111. 

Campbell, Lucille Methodist Old Peoples' Home 1415 Foster Ave., Chicago 40, 111. 

Carter, Mrs. Edith M Boylan-Haven School 1214 Jessie St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Carter, Helen V McCarty Community House 750 Fletcher St., Cedartown, Ga. 

Chaffin, Mary E North Arkansas Rural Work Box 327, Melbourne, Ark. 

Chandler, Mrs. Eu'a M New York Deaconess Association. . .1175 Madison Ave., New York 28, N. Y. 

Chandler, Mamiej Wesley Foundation, East Carolina College.. 501 E. 5th St., Greenville, N. C. 

Cheever, Mrs. Mildred B The Methodist Home Chelsea, Mich. 

Clark, Dorothy M Cookson Hills Center Cookson, Okla. 

Clark, Homie R Holloway Deaconess Home 303 Howard St., Bridgeport, Ohio 

Clark, Mabel V Wesley Community House 150 Colima St., San Antonio, Tex. 

Clipper, Flora Marcy Center 1539 S. Springfield Ave., Chicago 23, 111. 

Coburn, May J Miami Latin Center 1200 N. E. Miami Court, Miami 32, Fla. 

Coger, Naomi Vashti School Thomasville, Ga. 

Conover, T. Jeanne Cambridge District Parish Work Cambridge, Ohio 

Cook, Olive A Trinity Methodist Church 215 Lancaster St., Albany 10, N. Y. 

Cooling, Elizabeth Illinois Wesleyan University Bloomington, 111. 

Coon, Edna P Methodist Home for Children Box 348, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Coulter, Osta A Canton District 1323 10th St., N. W., Canton 3, Ohio 

Courtney, Ella Virginia Georgia Cooperative Rural Work 1347 Cave Spring Rd., Rome, Ga. 



Deaconesses in Active Service 41 

NAM! APPOINTMENT ADDRESS 

Cox, Angie M Broad Street Methodist Church Kingsport, Tenn. 

Crenshaw, Eva Wesley Community Center 229 Henry St., Portsmouth, Va. 

Cunningham, Ruth E First Methodist Church Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Cupp, Roma A Scarritt College for Christian Workers Nashville 5, Tenn. 

Curl, Edith M Frances DePauw Home 4952 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 27, Calif. 

Dangers, Mary S Bethesda Hospital Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Daniels, Florence Scott Memorial Methodist Church 609 E. Kirby St., Detroit 2, Mich. 

Daves, Fae L St. Mark's Community Center 1130 N. Rampart St., New Orleans 16, La. 

Davis, Myrta Muhlenberg Methodist Settlement Rt. 4, Central City, Ky. 

Day, Lillian Vashti School Thomasville, Ga. 

Decker, Ruth E First Methodist Church Westfield, Mass. 

DeGraff, Doris J Dilles Community Center Rt. 2, Jacobsburg, Ohio 

DePonceau, Anna M Metropolitan-Duane Methodist Church 1175 Madison Ave., 

New York 28, N. Y. 

Devine, Etta Navajo Methodist Mission School Box 877, Farmington, N. M. 

Diaz, Dolores R Robincroft Rest Home 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Divers, Rachel J Bethlehem Center 1417 Charlotte Ave., Nashville, Tenn. 

Dixon, Carrie M Board of Missions 210 First St., Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Dolby, Eleanor L Central Office of Promotion and Cultivation 920 Greenwood Ave., 

Evanston, 111. 

Donahue, Mrs. Christopher. . ..Methodist Deaconess Home and Centers 114 S. 33th St., Philadelphia 4, Pa. 

Douglass, Beulah A Methodist Hospital of Southern California 275 Robincroft Drive, 

Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Dower, Zillah J Fliedner Hall 144 Broadway, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Drais, Lenora Green Street Methodist Church 638 N. Main St., Piqua, Ohio 

Duhigg, Ada B Highland Boy Community House. ..Rt. 1, Box 30-B, Bingham Canyon, Utah 

Dumke, Marjorie J Wesley House 103 N. 16th Ave., Phoenix, Ariz. 

Dunker, D. Barbara Navajo Methodist Mission School Box 877, Farmington, N. M. 

Dutcher, Louise E First Methodist Church Joplin, Mo. 

Dutrow, Clara I First Methodist Church 3315 W. Military, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Ebel, Pauline E Lakeland Protestant Chapel Program 1607 Schley St., 

San Antonio 10, Tex. 

Eble, Pearl L Susannah Wesley Hall 223 29th St., Newport News, Va. 

Eddy, Pearl M Kansas Methodist Home for Children (Newton, Kans.) 310 S. 9th St., 

Salina, Kans. 

Edgerton, Mabel E Vashti School Thomasville, Ga. 

Edick, Helen M Hartford Seminary Foundation 125 Terry Road, Hartford, Conn. 

Edwards, Esther Erie School Olive Hill, Ky. 

Edwards, Pearle Wesley Community House 1024 E. Main St., Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Ellis, Lillian B Metcalfe Community House Rt. 1, Dunbar, Pa. 

Elmer, Hulda Bethesda Hospital Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Eisner, G. Ella Linnton Community Center 10614 N. W. St. Helens Road, 

Portland 10, Ore. 

Emory, Ruth P St. Luke's Methodist Church 1516 N. Harvey, Oklahoma City 3, Okla. 

Engel, Bertha Marcy Center 1539 S. Springfield Ave., Chicago 23, 111. 

Estep, Bessie L Seward General Hospital Seward, Alaska 

Esterline, Kathryn E Open Door Community House 2405 Second Ave., Columbus, Ga. 

Eubanks, Moselle G Bethlehem Center 920 N. Blair St., Jackson, Miss. 

Ewart, Marjorie R Board of Education 115 N. Fifth St., Camden 2, N. J. 

Ewing, Betsy K Scarritt College for Christian Workers Nashville 5, Tenn. 

Ezell, Catherine Holston Valley Rural Work Box 1178, Johnson City, Tenn. 

Falls, Vera R National College Rural Work 5123 Truman Rd., Kansas City 27, Mo. 

Farrington, Alice E McCrum Community House 26 Nutt Ave., Uniontown, Pa. 

Faust, Lorna M Bethany Hospital and Home 5025 N. Paulina St., Chicago 40, 111. 

Fendenheim, Mary M Leave — health 944 Hardesty Blvd., Akron 20, Ohio 

Fennema, Helen G Harwood Girls' School 1114 7th Avenue, N. W., Albuquerque, N. M. 

Ferguson, Ruth E Wesley House 1300 S. 10th St., Phoenix, Ariz. 

Fernandes, Beatrice M Houchen Settlement 1119 E. 5th St., El Paso, Tex. 

Fetzer, Sophia Fairmont Subdistrict Mission Work 226 Walnut Ave., Fairmont, W. Va. 

Flaherty, Ruth A Deaconess Home and Community Center. .278 Kaighn Ave., Camden, N. J. 

Flood, Jennie D Sue Bennett Rural Project Sue Bennett College, London, Ky. 

Floyd, Mary F Pfeiffer Junior College Misenheimer, N. C. 

Foster, Susie Peach Wesley Foundation Martha Washington College, Fredericksburg, Va. 

Foust, Lee Ola Wesley House 129 Wharf Ave., Nashville 10, Tenn. 

Frakes, Marie H Deaconess Home and Community Center 278 Kaighn Ave., Camden, N. J. 

Frame, Ruth A Leave— for sutdy 55 Elizabeth St., Hartford 5, Conn. 

Frey, Catherine E Children's Home 6350 Main St., Williamsville 21, N. Y. 

Fue8sler, Ruth Wesley Community House 2131 N. Commerce St., Ft. Worth, Tex. 

Fullmer, L. Mae Washington Deaconess Home 4825 16th St., N. W., Washington 11, D. C. 

Funk, Alice M The Methodist Publishing House. .. .6338 S. Eggleston Ave., Chicago 21, 111. 

Garrett, Phyllis J Bethany Methodist Church 152iy 2 S. Wichita, Wichita, Kan. 

Garrett, Sarah May Seward Sanatorium Box 330, Seward, Alaska 

Garrison, TJla M Newark District Ill 3rd Ave.. Newark, N. J. 

Garwood, Florence Methodist Manor of Tulsa 4100 E. 31st St., Tulsa, Okla. 

Giancola, Anna G Jefferson Avenue Methodist Church 14456 E. Jefferson Ave., 

Detroit 15, Mich. 

Gibby, Carol L Florida Rural Work 306 W. Hayne St., Madison, Fla. 

Gibson, Patricia M Houchen Settlement 1119 E. 5th St., El Paso, Tex. 

Gilbert, Ola Wayside Community House 811 E. Tuscarawas St., Canton 2, Ohio 

Gilwick, Mrs. Edna P Methodist Old People's Home 1415 Foster Ave., Chicago 40, 111. 

Gipson, Frieda M National College for Christian Workers 5123 Truman Road, 

Kansas City 27, Mo. 
Gist, Lucy R Bethlehem Center 970 E. Humbolt St., Ft. Worth 4, Tex. 



42 

NAMB APPOINTMENT ADDRESS 

Gleason, Dorothy C The Community Methodist Church 170 Poplar Ave., Millbrae, Calif. 

Gleifler, Nellie V Frances DePauw Home 4952 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 27, Calif. 

Glendinning, Mary E Browning Home and Mather Academy Camden, S. C. 

Glenn, Cora Lee North Mississippi Rural Work Iulut, Miss. 

Goetz, Adena L Bethesda Hospital Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Goode, Betty Ruth Scarritt College for Christian Workers Nashville 5, Term. 

Goodier, Lura J First Methodist Church 315 W. Oklahoma, Blackwell, Okla. 

Goodwin, Pauline M Bethlehem Center 1417 Charlotte Ave., Nashville, Term. 

Green, Evelyn H Indian Mission Cooperative Work Box 4029, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Greene, Beatrice E Leave— home duties 930 W. 4th St., Spencer, Iowa 

Greer, Mae I Wesley Community House 1520 8th Ave., Meridian, Miss. 

Gripman, Merle A National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U. S. A. ..1175 Madison Ave. 

New York 28, N. Y. 

Grisham, Carolyn D Sabbatical leave 3000 Bridge Ave., Cleveland 13, Ohio 

Guigou, Emily C Moore Community House 932 Davis St., Biloxi, Miss. 

Guinn, Violet M North Alabama Rural Work Sulligent, Ala. 

Hahn Twila Navajo Methodist Mission School Box 877, Farmington, N. M. 

Hammer, Ruth The Christ Hospital Cincinnati 19, Ohio 

Hanley, Nora M The Methodist Church Box 938, Liberal, Kan. 

Hanson, Martha M Grand Avenue Methodist Church 205 E. 9th St., Kansas City 6, Mo. 

Hanton, Marjorie E Sabbatical leave Scarritt College, Nashville 6, Tenn. 

Harding, Dorothy E First Methodist Church 1185 Willamette St., Eugene, Ore. 

Harding, Orianna F Deaconess Hospital 14 Autumn St., Boston, Mass. 

Harrell, Mabel K Leave — for study P. O. Box 877, Emory University, Ga. 

Harris, Neoma M Children's Worker in Hospitals 1175 Madison Ave., New York 28, N. Y. 

Harrison, Jeannetta Leave — home duties 168 Avenue A, S. W., Winter Haven, Fla. 

Harwood, Mary E Lake Bluff Orphanage 200 Scranton Ave., Lake Bluff, 111. 

Hatz, Dora E Lake Bluff Orphanage 200 Scranton Ave., Lake Bluff, 111. 

Hays, Gladys M Leave — home duties Box 277, Worthington, Ind. 

Heath, Loraine North Missippi Rural Work Box 275, Fulton, Miss. 

Heath, Thelma R Bethlehem Community Center 2500 Elmwood Ave., Columbia, S. C. 

Heatherington, Irene Wesley House 129 Wharf Ave., Nashville, Tenn. 

Hedman, Mary C Park Avenue Methodist Church 1175 Madison Ave., New York 28, N. Y. 

Hempel, Lena Bethany Deaconess Hospital 237 St. Nicholas Ave., Brooklyn 37, N. Y. 

Hendricks, Lillie J Harwood Girls School 1114 7th St., N. W. Albuquerque, N. M. 

Hewes, Mildred J Thoburn Terrace 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Hickok, Eleanore E Cherokee Indian Mission Box 174, Cherokee, N. C. 

Hight, Margaret E Southwest Texas Rural Work Box 94, Leesville, Texas 

Hill, Helene R Methodist Mission 1220 N. 7th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hill, Mary E Leave— home duties 1914 Fifth St., Sarasota, Fla. 

Hobbs, Gladys L City Missionary Society 22 W. Erie St., Chicago 10, 111. 

Hodkins, Margaret I Bethlehem Center 301 S. Caldwell St., Charlotte, N. C. 

Hoffman, Sara Gene First Methodist Church 901 Clay St., Houston 2, Texas 

Hoge, Ora Marie Robincroft Rest Home 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Holt, Ruth E The Methodist Church Mentor, Ohio 

Hook, Dorothy A Centre Methodist Church 7 Washington St., Maiden 48, Mass. 

Hooper, Lottie Ora Vashti School Tkemasville, Ga. 

Hoppock, Mearle R Goodwill Industries 45126 Date St., Lancaster, Calif. 

Home, Martha E Valley Institute Box 56, Pharr, Tex. 

Horner, Hazel M Methodist Deaconess Home and Centers 114 S. 38th St., Philadelphia 4, Pa. 

Howard, Janett E The Methodist Church 407 W. San Bernardina Road, Covina, Calif. 

Huck, Mary Lou Community Methodist Church 560 El Camino Real, San Bruno, Calif. 

Hudgins, Mildred Student Work, University of Texas Austin, Tex. 

Hudgins, Ruby F West Tennessee Rural Work Finley, Tenn. 

Huffman, Mabel C Navajo Methodist Mission School Box 877, Farmington, N. M. 

Huitema, Sylvia Wood Junior College Box 65, Mathiston, Miss. 

Humphrey, Melva J Bethlehem Community Center 530 N. E. 6th St., Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Humphreys, Maurine L Milwaukee Deaconess Home 917 N. 11th St.. Milwaukee 3, Wis. 

Huskey, Marjorie L Government Street Methodist Church Mobile 20, Ala. 

Ice, Alta Tennessee Conference Council 1102 19th Avenue South, Nashville, Tenn. 

Jacobs, Ruth A Bethesda Hospital Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Jamieson, Addie M Georgia Cooperative Rural Work 483 College St., Macon, Ga. 

Jenkins, Erma Vashti School Tnomasville, Ga. 

Johnson, Clara R The Christ Hospital Cincinnati 19, Ohio 

Johnson, DeLaris L Navajo Methodist Mission School Box 877, Farmington, N. M. 

Johnson, Helen L Board of Missions 150 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

Johnson, Rosamond Wesley Community House 342 Richardson St., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Johnston, L. Darleen Leave — health Norwich, Kan. 

Jones, Edna V Erie School Olive Hill, Ky. 

Jones, Nellie M Esther Hall 357 S. 4th Street, E., Salt Lake City, Utah 

Jordan, Edith M Carter Memorial Methodist Church 609 Hunnewell St., 

Needham Heights, Mass. 

Judd, Dorothy A Broadway Methodist Church 3000 Bridge Ave., Cleveland 13, Ohio 

Jury, Florence R Open Door Community House 2405 Second Ave., Columbus, Ga. 

Kasse, Linda E Bethany Deaconess Hospital 237 St. Nicholas Ave., Brooklyn 37, N. Y. 

Kee, Sarah J Sabbatical leave Drew University, Madison, N. J. 

Keeler, Dale C Council of Churches of Pittsburgh Area 419 Lloyd St., Pittsburgh 8, Pa. 

Keim, Evelyn O Leave— for study Scarritt College, Nashville 5, Tenn. 

Kelley, Dorothy M St. Croix Box 44, Kings Hill, St. Croix, Virgin Islands 

Kelley, Pearlye Maye Student Counselor, Louisiana Polytechnic Institute Box 34, Tech Station, 

Ruston, La. 
Kelly, Lillian M Miami Latin Center 1200 N. E. Miami Ct., Miami, Fla. 



Deaconesses in Active Service 43 

NAM! APPOINTMENT ADDRESS 

Keneval, Nellie Mae New York Deaconess Association 1175 Madison Ave., New York 28, N. Y. 

Kern, A. Ruth Freeman Clinic and Newark Conference Hospital 1119 E. 5th St., 

El Paso, Tex. 

Kewish, Mona E Sabbatical leave 7301 Zimpler St., New Orleans, La. 

Kieffer, Frances M City Missionary Society and Deaconess Work 18 N. Ellwood, 

Baltimore 24 Md. 

Kiehlbauch, Annette The Methodist Church Edwall, Wash. 

Kinch, Alberta R Deaconess Hospital Spokane 4, Wash. 

Kraut, Helene M 1525 W. 90th St., Seattle 77, Wash. 

Kreutziger, Susan Bethesda Hospital Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Kruger, Leota E Wesley House 562 N. 5th St., Memphis, Tenn. 

Kuhler, Katheryn Southwest Missouri Rural Work 402 West St., Cassville, Mo. 

Larcom, Lena G Bancroft-Taylor Rest Home 74 Cookman, Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Lardin, Beryl E St. Paul and St. Andrew Methodist Church 1175 Madison Ave.,' 

New York 28, N. Y. 

Lary, Madeline E Leave — home duties Gorham, N. H. 

Law, Louise First Methodist Church Box 245, Greenville, Miss. 

Leach, Helen M Patapsco Methodist Church 2828 E. Baltimore St., Baltimore 24, Md. 

Leeper, Alpharetta Board of Missions 150 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

Lehn, Ethel M Leave— health 620 Center St., Waukegan, 111. 

Lemons, Leone Southwest Missouri Rural Work 503 S. Marshall, Marshfield, Mo. 

Leonard, Alice I Methodist Church Home 4499 Manhattan College Parkway, 

New York 71, N. Y. 

Letzig, Betty J First Methodist Church Box 469, Liberty, Tex. 

Leveridge, Ura A Holding Institute Laredo, Tex. 

Lewton, Erne M Bidwell-Riverside Community Center 2580 Onawa, Des Moines 16, Iowa 

Little, Dorothy E Houchen Settlement 1119 E. 5th St., El Paso, Tex. 

Littlejohn, Mary Beth South Carolina Rural Work Pacolet, S. C. 

Long, Helen D Govans Methodist Church 3517 Old York Rd., Baltimore 18, Md. 

Lowry, Carmen Huston-Tillotson College, Eliza Dee Hall 1203 East Ave., Austin, Tex. 

Lukens, M. Edna Browning Home and Mather Academy Camden, S. C. 

Lummis, Gladys Chicago Training School Garrett Biblical Institute, Evanston, 111. 

Lyman, Leah Belle 2562 E. Water St., Tucson, Ariz. 

McCallister, Grace Methodist Old People's Home 1415 Foster Ave., Chicago 40, 111. 

McCarter, Iva E Peek Home Polo, 111. 

McClellan, Lalah G Wesley Methodist Church 3000 Bridge Ave., Cleveland 13, Ohio 

McCormick, Lucile Methodist Old People's Home 1415 Foster Ave., Chicago 40, 111. 

McCracken, Sarah K Leave — home duties 1308 W. Markham Ave., Durham, N. C. 

McDannell, Ruth D The Methodist Church Burnt Cabins, Pa. 

McKee, Beatrice Cunningham Children's Home 905 N. Cunningham, Urbana, 111. 

McKeeman, E. Pearle Esther Hall 1002 S. Broadway, Wichita 11, Kan. 

McKenzie, Mary Annis Middle Tennessee Rural Work Box 357, Waynesboro, Tenn. 

McLaughlin, Margaret D Wesley Community House 431 S. W. 11th, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

McNabb, Reva I Frances DePauw Home 4952 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 27, Calif. 

McNish, Mary F The Methodist Church 418 Touhy Ave., Park Ridge, 111. 

McRoberts, Lena V Methodist Deaconess Home and Centers. .114 S. 38th St., Philadelphia 4, Pa. 

McVeigh, Blanche Montana Deaconess School 1539 11th Ave., Helena, Mont. 

Mandlebaum, Helen B Wesley Community House 805 E. Washington St., Louisville, Ky. 

Marquart, Lois L Odanah Indian Mission Box 255, Ashland, Wis. 

Marshall, Margaret Scott's Run Settlement Box 147, Osage, W. Va. 

Martin, Inez Wesley Community House 1011 Elysian, Houston, Tex. 

Matkin, Iva Lou Board of Missions 150 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

Maxwell, Gene E West Wisconsin Rural Work Box 4, Phillips, Wis. 

May, Mildred L Highland Boy Community House. ..Rt. 1, Box 30-B, Bingham Canyon, Utah 

Mayhall, Ruth M Rosa Valdez Settlement Box 4183, Tampa, Fla. 

Merritt, Arlene Sabbatical leave 3000 Bridge Ave., Cleveland 13, Ohio 

Metzger, Mabel M Robincroft Rest Home 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Miller, Carrie Leave — for study 2045 Fillmore, Denver, Colo. 

Miller, Margaret L David and Margaret Home for Children 1350 Third St., La Verne, Calif. 

Mills, Mertie First Methodist Church 520 Humboldt, Manhattan, Kan. 

Millsap, Kathryna Wesley Hospital 3214 E. Third St., Wichita 8, Kan. 

Mitchell, Nellie St. John's Methodist Church Route 2, Spencer, W. Va. 

Meorman, Wortley Thoburn Terrace 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Morgan, Jean M Frances DePauw Home 4952 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 27, Calif. 

Morris, Frieda M West Virginia Coal Fields, Bluefield District Ashland, W. Va. 

Mort, Lora M Wesley House 129 Wharf Ave., Nashville, Tenn. 

Morton, Beulah T Minnie Nay Settlement House 43 Marshall St., Benwood, W. Va, 

Murdock, Alice E Esther Hail 221 W. 9th St., Cincinnati 2, Ohio 

Murphret, Evelyn V The Methodist Home Hospital 1125Vo Lowerline, New Orleans, La. 

Murray, Louise Neighborhood House 506 Fourth St., Calexico, Calif. 

Murrell, H. Ruth Seward General Hospital Seward, Alaska 

Myer, A. Adair Bethlehem Center 1016 State St., Richmond, Va. 

Myers, Ivy G The Methodist Publishing House 22 W. Erie St., Chicago 10, 111. 

Nearhood, Alice M 422 E. 1st Ave., Mitchell, S. D. 

N«uling, Haydee Leav»— health 5914 W. Eris St., Chicago 44, 111. 

Newbwry, Edna Deaconess Hospital Wenatchee, Wash. 

Newcomb, Kathryn National College for Christian Workers 5123 Truman Road, 

Kansas City 27, Mo. 

Nichols, E. Louise Board of Missions 150 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

Nichols, Mary E Killingsworth Home 1831 Pendleton St., Columbia, S. C. 

Nixon, Rosemary Maine Rural Work— Washington County Box 352, Millbridge, Maine 



44 

NAME APPOINTMENT ADDRESS 

Norton, Dorothy E First Methodist Church 793 Main St., Olean, N. Y. 

Nowlin, Elizabeth Centenary Methodist Community Center 612 Monroe St., 

Nashville 8, Tenn. 

Nuendel, Paula Bethany Deaconess Hospital 237 St. Nicholas Ave., Brooklyn 37, N. Y. 

Nuttall, Shiela E Louisiana Rural Work, St. Tammany Parish Box 6, Lacombe, La. 

Nye, Alta W Eastern North Carolina Rural Work Pembroke, N. C. 

Oakland, Ruby Chicago Deaconess Home 22 W. Erie St., Chicago 10, 111. 

Orrell, Beatrice M Wesley Community House 1100 Varela St., Key West, Fla. 

Owen, Reva A Clyde Park Methodist Church Clyde Park, Mont. 

Palmer, Esther G Dumas Wesley House 2732 Mill St., Mobile 17, Ala. 

Palmer, Orva M Deaconess Children's Home 2120 Highland Ave., Everett, Wash. 

Parker, Annie Brewster Hospital 1640 Jefferson St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Parker, G. Maye Community Church Box 1, Ashfork, Ariz. 

Parsell, Miriam A St. James Methodist Church 101 W. Tabor Road, Philadelphia 20, Pa. 

Patterson, Joyce Raye Conference Youth Work Baker University, Baldwin, Kans. 

Peacock, Frances Paine College Augusta, Ga. 

Pease, Bessie G The Methodist Church Edwall, Wash. 

Peppiatt, Minnie F Fourth Avenue Methodist Church 345 50th St., Brooklyn 20, N. Y. 

Perry, Constance Bethlehem Community House 1401 College St. , Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Perry, H. Louise Mary Elizabeth Inn 1040 Bush St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Pflueger, Martha M Bethesda Hospital Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Piper, Mary Louise Navajo Methodist Mission School Box 877, Farmington, N. M. 

Pope, Ruth I Board of Missions 150 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

Poppe, Genevieve C Mary Todd Gambrill Neighborhood House and Riddle 

Memorial Deaconess Home and Center 307 West St., Wilmington, Del. 

Porter, Willie May First Methodist Church 27 S. Spring, La Grange, 111. 

Powell, Garnett G Bethesda Hospital Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Powell, Phoebe P First Methodist Church 901 Clay Street, Houston 2, Tex. 

Powers, Lela I Harriet Ballou Day Nursery Box 1438, Sioux City, Iowa 

Price, Doris A Los Angeles County General Hospital 1718 Sichel St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Propert, Jennie A Union Methodist Church 507 West St., Wilmington, Del. 

Pryor, Elisabeth Ferrum Junior College Ferrum, Va. 

Pylman, Myrtle E Erie School Olive Hill, Ky. 

Reager, Maurine E Interboard Council 2100 S. Josephine, Denver 10, Colo. 

Reeves, Helen B Wesley Community House 200 Cherokee St., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Reich, Bertha E Deaconess Hospital Wenatchee, Wash. 

Reichmann, Dorothea Bethesda Hospital Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Reid, Dorothea M Rosa Valdez Settlement Box 4183, Tampa, Fla. 

Reuter, Grace M Erie School Olive Hill, Ky. 

Reynolds, G. Birdie Wesley Community House 1520 8th Ave., Meridian, Miss. 

Rhodes, Doris J Social Worker Box 755, Windham, Ohio 

Rhodes, Edna M Church of the Saviour 10308 Shaker Blvd., Cleveland 4, Ohio 

Rickford, Millie Freeman Clinic and Newark Conference Hospital 1119 E. 5th St., 

El Paso, Tex. 

Riddle, Mary R Southside Community Center 518 S. Guadalupe St., San Marcos, Tex. 

Ringer, Lucile Leave — home duties Round Mountain, Ala. 

Ristine, Ethel Southern California-Arizona Conference Board of Education. .. .5250 Santa 

Monica Blvd., Los Angeles 29, Calif. 

Robb, Ruth M Montana Deaconess School 1539 E. 11th Ave., Helena, Mont. 

Robbins, Laura Harwood Girls' School 1114 N. 7th St., Albuquerque, N. M. 

Robinson, Jonell First Methodist Church 310 W. Washington St., Greenwood, Miss. 

Robinson, Lelia M Sager-Brown Home Baldwin, La. 

Robinson, Martha Whosoever Community House 310 S. San Saba St., San Antonio, Tex. 

Rogers, Annie Mclver Bethlehem Center 266 W. Hampton Ave., Spartanburg, S. C. 

Rothrock, Patricia S Central Methodist Church 334 W. Pine St., Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Rubins, Geneva A Bethesda Hospital Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Russell, L. Cornelia Board of Missions 150 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

Russell, Dorothy M Wesley Community Center 431 S. W. 11th St., Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Russell, Rubye E Ensley Community House 1400 Avenue H, Ensley 8, Ala. 

Rust, Lena Mae Texas Mission Home and Training School Box 2117, San Antonio, Tex. 

Sanders, Oscie A Sue Bennett College London, Ky. 

Sawtelle, Bertie M The Methodist Church Box 083, East Wenatchee, Wash. 

Schnackel, Ida Leave— home duties Box 123, Hancock, Iowa 

Schneider, Ida Leave— home duties 6731 25th Ave. Kenosha, Wis. 

Schrader, Willie M Wesley Chapel Methodist Church 620 Crown St., Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Schreiner, Meredith L Bethesda Hospital Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Schwab, Lily R Petworth Methodist Church. .. .4825 16th St., N. W., Washington 11, D. C. 

Sexton, Edna M Ethel Harpst Home 740 Fletcher St., Cedartown, Ga. 

Shacklette, Mary M Ensley Community House 1400 Avenue H, Ensley 8, Ala. 

Sheppard, Cecelia Paine College Augusta, Ga. 

Shough, Ary M Jesse Lee Home Seward, Alaska 

Shutt, Mrs. Ramona H Marcy Center 1539 S. Springfield Ave., Chicago 23, III. 

Smee, Nola I Boylan-Haven School 1214 Jessie St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Smith, Helen May First Methodist Church 1127 Gardena Blvd., Gardena, Calif. 

Smith, Martha O Goodwill Industries 3232 Summit, Kansas City, Mo. 

Smith, Ruth A Cornell University Ithaca, N. Y. 

Sochor, Bozena McCrum Community House 26 Nutt Ave. , Uniontown, Pa. 

Sommerville, Barbara L Northwest Texas Conference Youth Work 209 Whiteside Bldg., 

Lubbock, Tex. 



Deaconesses in Active Service 45 

NAME APPOINTMENT ADDRESS 

Sprengle, Lucile First Methodist Church Box 086, East Wenatchee, Wash. 

Stafford, Margarett V Grant Hall and Elmore Home 917 N. 11th St., Milwaukee 3, Wis. 

Stahley, Mollie F Springfield Weekday School 1010 Redbud Lane, Springfield, Ohio 

Starkebaum, Ida Young Woman's Bethany Home 824 W. Armitage Ave., Chicago 14, III. 

Steele, Hilda S Bethany Home and Hospital 1614 Ainslie St., Chicago 40, 111. 

Stentz, Jane C Board of Missions 150 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 

Sterling, Elizabeth Frances DePauw Home 4952 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 27 Calif. 

Stevens, Florence S Providence Deaconess Home 136 Prairie Ave., Providence 5, R. I. 

Stewart, Ilo L George O. Robinson School Santurce 34, Puerto Rico 

Stewart, Martha B Holston Valley Rural Work Box 435, Jasper, Term. 

Stewart, Mary Belle Methodist Union of Greater Detroit 6865 Mettetal, Detroit 28, Mich. 

Stimson, Margaret L Highland Boy Community House. .Rt. 1, Box 30-B, Bingham Canyon, Utah 

Stinogel, Edna M Austin Methodist Church 502 N. Central Ave., Chicago 44, 111. 

Stockton, Eunice E Moore Community House 932 Davis St., Biloxi, Miss. 

Stouffer, Thelma M Broadway Temple-Washington Heights Methodist Church 1175 Madison 

Ave., New York 28, N. Y. 

Stout, Josephine E Methodist Hospital Indianapolis 7, Ind. 

Stow, Ruth J Methodist Home for Children 6350 Main St., Williamsville 21, N. Y. 

Stowe, Elsie F The Methodist Church Home Ill Elm St., West Haven 16, Conn. 

Straley, Faye Gum Moon Residence Hall 940 Washington St., San Francisco 8, Calif. 

Streb, Louise Bethesda Hospital Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Summey, Mattie Lou First Methodist Church Forest Citv, N. C. 

Surratt, F. Geraldine Western North Carolina Rural Work Rt. 1, Banner Elk, N. C. 

Sweet, Mildred E Methodist Hospital 1812 N. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Taylor, Frances A Church of All Nations 3035 Guivado St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Thatcher, Grace West Kentucky Rural Work 247 W. Broadway, Madisonville, Ky. 

Thompson, Elizabeth Louisiana Conference Board of Missions P. O. Box 4156, Shreveport, La. 

Thornton, Blanche Freeman Clinic and Newark Conference Hospital 1119 E. 5th St., 

El Paso, Tex. 

Tice, Lois Methodist Home for the Aged 4499 Manhattan College Parkway, 

New York 71, N. Y. 

Timm, Lola B Wesley Settlement House 923 Dameron Ave., Knoxville, Tenn. 

Tompos, Julia L Bidwell-Riverside Community Center 1203 Hartford Ave., 

Des Moines 15, Iowa 

Trickett, Waunita J South Mississippi Rural Work Box 44, Raleigh, Miss. 

Tucker, Fay St. Paul's Methodist Church 113 Embury Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Tyler, Arline Leave— health 1546 Magnolia St., Shreveport, La. 

Tvler, Virginia L Bethlehem Center and Ensley Community House 1400 Avenue H, 

Ensley 8, Ala. 

Tyree, Aubrey Leave — home duties 126 Fannin St., Corpus Christi, Tex. 

Ullery, Bessie M Leave — home duties Redding, Iowa 

Ungericht, Helen C Mt. Lebanon Methodist Church. .. .3319 W. Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh 29, Pa. 

Vanek, Emma J Holloway Deaconess Home 303 Howard St., Bridgeport, Ohio 

Vam, Mattie S Kindergarten Work on Mexican Border. .952 Palm Blvd., Brownsville, Tex. 

Vaughn, Betty Jo Scarritt College for Christian Workers Nashville 5, Tenn. 

Vause, Grace A Robincroft Rest Home 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena •, Calif. 

Waitt, M. Ruth Commission on Promotion and Cultivation 22 W. Erie St., Chicago 19, 111. 

Walker, Sadie L First Methodist Church 780 Gray St., Des Moines, Iowa 

Wallace, Avis Boylan-Haven School 1214 Jessie St., Jacksonville, Fla 

Ware, Fay A Leave — home duties 107 N. Palmway, Lake Worth, Fla. 

Watts, Sue E Harwood Girls' School 1114 7th St., N. W. Albuquerque, N. M. 

Weaver, Evelyn M Loan to Foreign Department 15 Warris Road, Lahore, Pakistan 

Webster, May L Eastern District 2811 Hudson Blvd., Jersey City, N. J. 

Wedell, Leola Leave— for study 3267 Kenyon Road, Columbus 21, Ohio 

Weeks, A. Louise Bethlehem Center 749 Walker Ave., Memphis, Tenn. 

Whitacre, Pauline Chicago Deaconess Home 22 W. Erie St., Chicago 10, 111. 

Whitaker, Isabel F Methodist Publishing House 28 Saunders St., North Weymouth 91, Mass. 

Whited, Mabel J Wesley Community House 414 N. Buena Vista, Robstown, Tex. 

Whitsitt, J. Louise Peninsula Conference Board of Missions 318 W. 31st St., Wilmington, Del. 

Wiggins, Mable Bancroft-Taylor Rest Home 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Wilber, Dorothy M Virginia Rural Work 105 Roanoke St., Christiansburg, Va. 

Wilder, Agnes M 1525 W. 90th St., Seattle 77, Wash. 

Wilkinson, Jane G Vashti School Thomasville, Ga. 

Wilson, Margaret E Epworth-Euclid Methodist Church 1919 E. 107th St., Cleveland 8, Ohio 

Winegarden, Leona M People's Methodist Church 609 Selma St., Cadillac, Mich. 

Wirz, Frieda Mothers' Jewels Home 826 Grant Ave., York, Neb. 

Wolf, Ethel R Ozona Community House Box 41, Ozona, Tex. 

Wolf, Hilda L Bethesda Hospital Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Wolfarth, Helen C Navajo Methodist Mission School Box 877, Farmington, N. M. 

Wolverton, Alma E First Methodist Church 22240 Morley, Dearborn 7, Mich. 

Wright, Nelle First Methodist Church Sierra and Canal Drive Apts., Turlock, Calif. 

Wrisley, Winifred Allen High School 331 College St., Asheville, N. C. 

Yeager, Blanche A Florida Conference Children's Work Box 78, Lakeland, Fla. 

Yoder, Nola D Rest Haven Home for Aged 360 H Street, N. W., Linton, Ind. 

Yokel, Rachel P Jesse Lee Home Seward, Alaska 

Young, E. Mae Board of Education Box 871, Nashville, Tenn. 

Young, Esther 801 East 1st St., McCook, Neb. 

Young, Margaret A Field Work 506 Chesterfield, Nashville, Tenn. 

Zimmerman, Lois E Council of Churches of Pittsburgh Area 4 Bayard Rd., Apt. 4-8, 

Pittsburgh 13, Pa,, 



46 Woman's Division of Christian Service 

HOME MISSIONARIES IN ACTIVE SERVICE 

NAME APPOINTMENT ADDRESS 

Beckwith, Josephine B Sabbatical leave Scarritt College, Nashville 5, Term. 

Cobb, Rosie Ann Sager-Brown Home Baldwin, La. 

Collins, Mrs. A. B Leave— home duties 2309 Chamberlain Ave., Chattanooga, Term. 

Decker, Ethel R Wesley House 562 N. 5th St., Memphis, Tenn. 

Farris, Buford E., Jr Wesley Community House 805 E. Washington St., Louisville, Ky. 

Hayes, Jack A Leave— health 508 E. Grand Ave., San Pedro, Calif. 

Holliday, H. Lucile Mothers' Memorial Center 547 W. 7th St., Cincinnati 3, Ohio 

Huff, M. Bernice George O. Robinson School Santurce 34, Puerto Rico 

King, Zoe L Langleyville Settlement Langleyville, 111. 

Odom, Edwin E David and Margaret Home for Children 1350 Third St., La Verne, Calif. 

Poole, Edna C Wesley House 562 N. 5th St., Memphis, Tenn. 

Rogers, Frederick D Bethlehem Center 1417 Charlotte Ave., Nashville, Tenn. 

Shrider, Robert E Bethlehem Center 970 E. Humbolt, Ft. Worth, Tex. 

Smith, Joy L Harriet Ballou Day Nursery and Wall Street Mission 312 S. Wall St., 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Titus, Julia P Allen High School 331 College St., Asheville, N. C. 

Wright, Ruth Neighborhood Center 615 Mary St., Utica 3, N. Y. 



FOREIGN MISSIONARIES— RETIRED 

As of November 1, 1956 

Name Fiblo Address 

Abbott, Anna Agnes India 1055 N. Kingsley Drive, Los Angeles 29, Calif. 

Abel, Edith F China 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Allen, Mable Alice China Early, Iowa 

Anderson, Mary A North Africa Cottage St., Pierre El Biar, Algiers, Algeria 

Atkins, Ruth E Philippines 1729 Beech St., St. Paul 6, Minn. 

Atkinson, Anna P Japan Wesley Gardens, Des Moines, Wash. 

Austin, Laura F India 1809 11th St., Portland, Ore. 

Bacon, Edna G Jndia 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Baker, L. Catherine China and Korea 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Ball, Jennie L India 521 Schuyler St., Marshall, Mich. 

Barber, Emma J India 1546 Sherman St., S. E., Grand Rapids 6, Mich. 

Barstow, Clara Grace South America 416 E. Leadora, Glendora, Calif. 

Baxter, Mary Jane Brazil 805 E. Clinton St., Huntsville, Ala. 

Beach, Lucy W India 1101 Woodsum St., Jackson, Mich. 

Beale, Elizabeth M India 7136 52nd Terrace, N., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Billings, (Mrs. Homer) 

Mary Young Korea 142 Church St., Ashland, Ore. 

Bjorklund, Sigrid C China 355 Lynn St., Maiden 48, Mass. 

Black, Nannie G Korea 125 Broad St., Sumter, S. C. 

Bobenhouse, Laura G India 115 Almansor St., North, Alhambra, Calif. 

Booth, Virginia E Mexico 116 Sonaita Ave., Nogales, Ariz. 

Bording, Maren P., R.N Philippines-Korea 300 Grand View St., Pasadena 3, Calif. 

Bradshaw, A. Eloise China 1811 Fareham Rd. S. W., Roanoke, Va. 

Bragg, Jessie A India Raymond, Neb. 

Brethorst, Alice B., R.N China 1114 N. 78th St., Seattle 3, Wash. 

Brethorst, S. Marie China 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Bricker, Mary Elizabeth, R.N.. India 1081 Columbus Ave., Benton Harbor, Mich. 

Bridenbaugh, Jennie B China 10 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach 2, Calif. 

Brooks, Jessie F Malaya 209 N. Marie Ave., Fullerton, Calif. 

Brown, Mary Sue Brazil 808 N. 15th St., Waco, Tex. 

Brown, Zula F China 209% N. Berendo St., Los Angeles 4, Calif. 

Brownlee, G. Charlotte Korea Munfordville, Kv. 

Bunce, Thirza E Malaya 2318 E. Center St., Terre Haute, Ind. 

Bunger, Frances M., R.N India 1923 Randolph, Topeka, Kansas 

Burdeshaw, Rhoda A China 2738 E. Wynnton Lane, Columbus, Ga. 

Carpenter, Mary F India 105 E. Main St., New Concord, Ohio 

Carson, Anna, R.N Philippines 1055 N. Kingsley Dr., Los Angeles 29, Calif. 

Chadwick, Freda Sumatra 4236 Second Rd., North, Arlington 3, Va. 

Chaffin, Mrs. Anna B Korea 3828 Calvert St., N. W., Washington 7, D. C. 

Chalmers, Clara E Cuba 413 Hillory St., New Orleans, La. 

Chase, Laura Japan 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Chilson, Elma M India 5 Twenty-fifth St., Merced, Calif. 

Christensen, Lydia D India Rt. 2, Hudson Rd., Cedar Falls, Iowa 

Church, Marie Korea and Japan 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Claiborne, M. Elizabeth China Box 254, Millersburg, Ky. 

Clark, Faith A India 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Clark, Grace Southern Rhodesia 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Clark, Lucie China, Cuba 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Colby, (Mrs. James R.) 

Delia Olson Malaya Loyal, Wis. 

Conard, (Mrs. Philip) 

Jennie Reid Uruguay Casilla de Correo, 445, Montevideo, Uruguay 

Cook, Margaret M Japan Wrens Nest, Monteagle, Tenn. 

Cooper, Lois W Japan 15 Mills Ave., Greenville, S. C. 



Foreign Missionaries — Retired 47 

Name Field Address 

Corbett, Lila M Malaya P. O. Box 1143, Black Mountain, N. C. 

Cornelison, Bernice M Peru and Philippines 4856 E. Edison, Tucson, Ariz. 

Craven, Norma B Malaya 761 Lafayette St., Denver 18, Colo. 

Cross, Cilicia, L Angola 546 S. Bright Ave., Whittier, Calif. 

Crouse, Margaret D India 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Cunningham, Charley May.... Mexico 2145 Brown Ave., Fresno, Calif. 

Curtice, Lois K Japan 213 Watchung Ave., North Plainfield, N. J. 

Dalrymple, Marion E India Laurel Park, Northampton, Mass. 

Daniel, Nell Margaret Japan Friendship Haven, Fort Dodge, Iowa 

Daniels, Martha J Mexico 1839 Anapuni St., Honolulu 14, T. H. 

Danner, Ruth M., R.N China 608 E. Walnut St., Bloomington, 111. 

Davis, Hazel Philippines 130 W. Main St., Knightstown, Ind. 

Dawsey, Lillian Knobles Brazil 2119 Highland Ave., Nashville, Tenn. 

Deam, Mary L Philippines 231 E. Washington, Pasadena, Calif. 

Dillingham, Grace L Korea 1033 N. Harvard, Los Angeles 29, Calif. 

Dodd, (Mrs. Duncan F.) 

Clara Bell Smith .China Gaylordsville, Conn. 

Dodd, Stella L., M.D India Methodist Home, Marionville, Mo. 

Dove, Agnes C. W India 33 Mansfield Ave., Cambuslang, Scotland 

Drescher, Mildred G India 363 Benjamin, S. E., Grand Rapids 6, Mich. 

Dresher, Mrs. Golden C. 

(Mildred M. Blakely) Philippines 701 E. First St., Hutchinson, Kan. 

Dunn, Olive India 7003 McCook, Hammond, Ind. 

Dyer, Clara Pearl China Box 204, Olneyville Sta., Providence 9, R. I. 

Eddy, Mabel L India 177 N. Fremont St., Whitewater, Wis. 

Edwards, Laura E Korea 3019 Homan Ave., Waco, Tex. 

Eldridge, Emma Mexico 2619 Etna St., Berkeley 4, Calif. 

Elliott, Bemice E India Hart, Mich. 

Emery, Phoebe India Box 377, Baldwin, Kan. 

Epps, Leila F Central Brazil Kingstree, South Carolina 

Ericson, Judith India 5015 N. Paulina St., Chicago 40, 111. 

Ernsberger, Mrs. Margaret Clndia Thoburn Terrace, 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Evans, Mary A Philippines 214 Highland St., Milton, Mass. 

Farmer, Ida A., R.N India 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Fearon, Dora C China 4705 Windsor Mill Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

Field, Ruth India Thoburn Terrace, 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Files, M. Estelle Burma and India R. F. D. 2, Brockport, N. Y. 

Finlay, Alice Japan 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Fisher, Fannie Fern India 418 Washington St., Quincy, 111. 

Foreman, Mary FIora.R.N Africa 1502 Monroe St., Amarillo, Tex. 

Forsyth, Estella M India 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Fox, Lillie F Mexico 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Frantz, Ida F China 710 Sunnyview Ave., Dayton 6, Ohio 

Fredericks, A. Edith China 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Glenn, Layona Brazil 116 Glade St., Conyers, Ga. 

Glidden, Zella M Angola 509 N. Clinton, Albion, Mich. 

Godfrey, Louise India 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Goodall, Annie India Mapleton, Iowa 

Green, Lola M India Ceres, Calif. 

Green, Mary Alice China 310 Oakwood Ave., Sanford, N C. 

Greene, Leola M India 8022 Radford, Detroit 4, Mich. 

Greer, Lillian China 4276 Avon St., Riverside, Calif. 

Griffin, Pansy Pearl China 849 South Ave., Bradford, Perm. 

Hadden, G. Evelyn India 1595 Clay St., San Francisco 9, Calif. 

Hankins, Ida Korea 15 N. 15th St., Wilmington, N. C. 

Haynes, Emily Irene Korea 52 Sawyer St., Hornell, N. Y. 

Heist, Laura A India 1814 S. E. 27th Ave., Portland 15, Ore. 

Hempstead, Ethel L Japan R. F. D., Kittery Point, Me. 

Herbert, Anne E., R.N .China 125 Broad St., Sumter, S. C. 

Hermiston, Margaret I. W. ...India 89 Harding Ave., Weymouth, Mass. 

Herrmann, Mrs. Carl C. 

(E. Lahuna Clinton) Jndia Wesley Gardens, Des Moines, Wash. 

Hess, Stella Southern Rhodesia 13808 Ardoon Ave., Cleveland 20, Ohio 

Hoath, Ruth India c/o Mrs. Walter T. Law, 614 N. Bluff St., Anthony, Kan. 

Hodges, Olive Japan 5934 Kowada, Chigasaki-shi, Japan 

Hoerner, Lena May Uruguay 266 South Hanover St., Hanover Apts., No. 3, Carlisle, Pa. 

Hoge, Elizabeth India 5343 Hamilton Ave., College Hill, Cincinnati 24, Ohio 

Holland, Charlie Japan 417 E. Laurel Ave., Lufkin, Tex. 

Holmes, Ada India 19 Fulwood Park, Liverpool 17, England 

Holmes, Lillian L., R.N China 4528 2nd Ave., N., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Holt, Nancy R Brazil 338 W. Free Mason St., Apt. No. 5, Norfolk, Va. 

Huffman, Loal E., M.D India 516 Cherry St., Bryan, Ohio 

Hulbert, Jeannette C Korea 3000 Bridge Ave., Cleveland 13, Ohio 

Hyde, Eva Louise Brazil 172 S. Downing St., Denver 9, Colo. 

Ingrum, Dora L Mexico 1001 Wilkes Blvd., Columbia, Mo. 

Jackson, Carrie U Korea Rt. 2, Box 70, Arlington, Ky. 

Jaquet, Myra A China 937 North Gibbs St., Pomona, Calif. 

Jefferson, Alice Japan 2301 East Ave., Rochester 10, N. Y. 

Jetton, Mabel G .Brazil 349 Tenth St., S. E., Washington, D. C. 

Johnston, Helen Brazil P. O. Box 54, Roseland, Fla. 

Jones, Dorothy China 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Jones, Edna China 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Jones, Jane D China 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Kennard, Olive India 1318 Belleview Dr., Encinitas, Calif. 

Kenyon, Carrie C .Malaya, Cuba 108 N. Sixth St., Connellsville, Pa. 



48 

NiMs Field Address 

Kesler, Mary Grace China 2312 S. W. 10th St., Miami 35, Fla. 

Ketring, Mary, M.D China, Philippines, India Rt. 2, Box 172, Holland, Ohio 

Keyhoe, Katherine India 508 North Court, Ottumwa, Iowa 

Kintner, Lela Burma Valley Center, Kan. 

Knox, Emma M China 2744 Regent St., Berkeley 5, Calif. 

Kostrup, B. Alfrida, R.N Philippines and Korea Pasadena 3, Calif. 

Lamb, Elizabeth Brazil Box 1199, Fayetteville, N. C. 

Lantz, Viola, M.D. China 578 S. 11th St., San Jose, Calif. 

Lawrence, Birdice China-Malaya 1112 North Cedar St., Lansing 6, Mich. 

Lawrence, Mabel India 5995 S. Jackson Rd., Jackson, Mich. 

Lee, Mabel Japan 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Li, Bi Cu, M.D China (Address unknown) 

Low, Nellie M Jndia 112 S. Alexander St., Millersburg, Ohio 

Lowder, Rosa May, R.N Korea No. 6 Staley Apts., 6 Franklin St., Bristol, Tenn. 

Mace, Rose A China Pineview St., Tice, Fla. 

MacKinnon, Sallie Lou China 115 Mockingbird Rd., Nashville 5, Tenn. 

Main, Mrs. Idabelle Lewis.... China, Brazil 157 Lovell Ave., Mill Valley, Calif. 

Manchester, Ruth C India 171 Spencer St., Winsted, Conn. 

Mann, Mary China Albany, Ind. 

Marker, Jessie B Korea Bancroft-Taylor Rest Home, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Markey, M. Belle Cuba and Mexico 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Marsh, Mabel Malaya and Mexico 8950 Victoria Ave., South Gate, Calif. 

Mason, F. Pearl China 751 Plymouth Road, Claremont, Calif. 

Masters, Florence F India 305 Grand St., Guthrie Center, Iowa 

Mathis, Maud A Brazil 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

McCartney, Blanche India 123 East St., Hastings, Neb. 

McQuie, Ada E Korea and Japan.. Clark Home, 1546 Sherman St., S. E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Meeker, Bessie L China 504 Pearl, Apt. 5, Denver, Colo. 

Merritt, Edna F China c/o Morrison Academy, Box 90, Taichung, Taiwan 

Miller, Ethel Korea Memorial Mission, 400 W. 2nd St., Wilmington, Del. 

Miller, Lula A Korea 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Miller, Viola L., R.N China Amelia, Ohio 

Montgomery, Urdell India 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Moore, Mary E., R.N Africa 8S0 Madison Ave., Patterson, N. J. 

Morgan, Mabel India Thoburn Terrace, 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Morgan, Margaret India Thoburn Terrace, 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Morrow, Julia E India 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Moses, Mathilde R India 9615 Mayne St., Bellflower, Calif. 

Munson, Kezia India Areola, 111. 

Naylor, Nell F India P. O. Box 613, Winslow, Ark. 

Nelson, Caroline C India 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Nelson, Dora L India 1204 S. McArthur Rd., Springfield, 111. 

Nelson, Marie, R.N Angola 8112 Tenth Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Nevitt, Jane Ellen China 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Nichols, Florence L India 9 Acre Rd., Concord, Mass. 

Nichols, Lillian E Korea 412 S. Brunswick St., Jessup, Ga. 

Nicolaisen, Martha C. W China 440 Lafayette Ave., Cincinnati 20, Ohio 

Odee, Bertha, R.N Philippines 5711 Berkshire Lane, Dallas 9, Tex. 

Oldroyd, Roxanna H India 224 W. Jackson Ave., Arkansas City, Kan. 

Overman, L. Belle Korea 713 S. Glendale Ave., Glendale, Calif. 

Park, Clara China Rawlings Sanitarium, Sandersville, Ga. 

Park, Edith A Mexico 531 Drake St., San Antonio, Tex. 

Parmenter, Ona M., R.N .Southern Rhodesia 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Peacock, Nettie L China 363 New St. Apts., Macon, Ga. 

Pearson, Mary N Mexico 17 Yarmouth St., Boston, Mass. 

Peet, Azalia E Japan 1826 Lake Rd., Webster, N. Y. 

Perkinson, Eliza Brazil 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Perrill, Mary Louise India 305 Harvard Dr., S. E. Albuquerque, N. Mexico 

Peterson, Mrs. B. O. 

(Armenia A. Thompson) .Philippines 123 Moore St., Seguin, Tex. 

Pider, Myrtle Z Japan 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Pittman, Annie M China, Borneo Breesport, N. Y. 

Plumb, Florence J China 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Pool, Lydia India 917 N. 4th St., Burlington, Iowa 

Potthoff , Edna, R.N Mexico 2920 University Blvd., Houston, Tex. 

Power, Elsie Burma 1016 Connecticut St., Lawrence, Kan. 

Pugh, Ada Malaya "Sandhurst," Charlton Pk., Keynsham, Bristol, England 

Putnam, Lela Brazil 3704 Southwestern, Dallas, Tex. 

Pyle, Martha E .China 2641 Forest, Kansas City, Mo. 

Quinton, Frances Southern Rhodesia 1015 E. Main St., Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Radley, Vena I China 612 University Ave., Syracuse 10, N. Y. 

Rahe, Cora L China 1141 Echo Park Ave., Los Angeles 26, Calif. 

Randall, S. Edith India 309 Houston St., Winfield, Kan. 

Rank, Minnie Malaya 3412 Chicago Ave., Minneapolis 7, Minn. 

Rea, C. Lois Malaya Rt. 2, Box 443, Homestead, Fla. 

Reid, Mabel Burma Friendship Haven, Fort Dodge, Iowa 

Richey, Elizabeth H China and Burma Senecaville, Ohio 

Roberts, Elizabeth, R.N Philippines and Korea.. Hampshire Arms Hotel, Apt. 501, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Robinson, Louise China 527 E. Main St., Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Rogers, Maggie J China 437 Gift St., Marlin, Tex. 

Rossiter, Henrietta B China 2310 Ninth Ave., East University Park, Iowa 

Rue, Margaret M China 114 S. 38th St., Philadelphia 4, Pa. 

Ruggles, Ethel India 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 



Foreign Missionaries — Retired 49 



Namb Field Addhess 

Saunby, Dora C, R.N India 123 Sycamore Park Dr., Los Angeles 31, Calif. 

Sayles, Florence A., R.N China 573 S. Boyle Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Scharpff, Hanna Korea 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Search, Blanche China 209% N. Berendo St., Los Angeles 4, Calif. 

Shannon, Ida L Japan 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Shannon, Mary E Burma, India 314 Greenwood St., Topeka, Kan. 

Sharp, Mrs. Alice Hammond. .Korea 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Sharpe, Dreta Cuba Ogeechee, Ga. 

Shelton, Mittie J China, Mexico 912 N. 32nd St., Waco, Tex. 

Simonds, Mildred India 1143 11th St., S., San Jose, Calif. 

Simpson, Cora E., R.N China The Methodist Home, Chelsea, Mich. 

Smith, Bertha A Korea Rt. 1, Box 30, Marshall, Mo. 

.Smith, Emily S Africa 48 Kingsland Rd., Worthing, Sussex, England 

Smith, Jennie M India 4205 S. E. Knight St., Portland 6, Ore. 

Smith, Muriel A .China 5 Rectory Rd., Burnham-on-Sea, Somerset, England 

Snavely, Gertrude E Korea £033 Locust St., West Philadelphia 39, Pa. 

Sprowles, Alberta B Japan New Hope, Pa. 

Stahl, Ruth China 796 19th St., San Bernardino, Calif. 

Stallings, Nina China, Philippines 816 Greenwood Ave., S. E. Atlanta 1, Ga. 

Stanford, Sue S China 1206 N. 15th St., Waco, Tex. 

Starkey, Bertha Japan c/o Howard Starkey, Cooley Farm, Warrensville, Ohio 

Staubli, Frieda, R.N China 114 Gladbachstrasse, Zurich 44, Switzerland 

Steger, Clara E .China 415 N. Main St., Mountain Grove, Mo. 

Stevens, Catherine Japan 288 S. K St., Dinuba, Calif. 

Stockwell, Grace L Burma and India 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Strow, Elizabeth M China 30 Bath Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Sutherland, May E India 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Swan, Hilda India 5015 N. Paulina St., Chicago 40, 111. 

Tarrant, Mary M China 437 Gift St., Marlin, Tex. 

Taylor, Erma M Japan 21 Hamilton Blvd., Kenmore, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Teague, Carolyn M Japan Rt. 1, Hartsell, Ala. 

Thomas, Ethel Mexico Harwood Girls' School, 1114 N. 7th St., Albuquerque, N. M. 

Thomasson, Leona China 7831 7th Ave., S., Birmingham, Ala. 

Thompson, May Bel China 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Treager, Gazelle Malaya, Brazil 905 E. College St., Seguin, Tex. 

Trissel, Maude V Korea 164 Chestnut St., Pasadena 3, Calif. 

Trotter, Charlotte China 172 Onondaga St., Lewiston, N. Y. 

Troy, Nina W China 114 S. Mendenhall, Greensboro, N. C. 

Tueker, Bertha Korea, Cuba Crawfordsville, Ga. 

Tuttle, Leila J China Rt. 6, Lenoir, N. C. 

Tyhurst, Mrs. Enfer Ernest 

(Fern M. Sinkey) China 1677 W. 256th St., Harbor City, Calif. 

Urech, Lydia Malaya 20 Zeltweg, Zurich 32, Switzerland 

Vail, Lucile Cuba and Mexico 229 Maine Ave., Long Beach 2, Calif. 

Vandergrift, Frances C Peru 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Wagner, Dora A Japan 1144 University, Wichita 12, Kan. 

Wagner, Ellasue Korea No. 6 Staley Apts., 6 Franklin St., Bristol, Tenn. 

Wallace, L. Ethel China 2036 Semlin Dr., Vancouver 12, B. C, Canada 

Warner, Emma E India Rt. 1, Winslow, Ark. 

Wasson, Julia M China Shannon, Miss. 

Waters, Alice G China Murray, Ky. 

Watrous, Mary China 24 Pioneer St., Cooperstown, N. Y. 

Waugh, Nora B India 290 Grand View St., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Webb, Lucy Jim China 1114 7th St., N. W., Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Wells, Annie M China 1439 N. Garfield Ave., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Westcott, Pauline E China 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Wheeler, L. Maude China 714 Locust St., Pasadena 4, Calif. 

White, Anna Laura Japan 3984% Oregon St., San Diego, Calif. 

White, Mary Culler ...China Oxford, Ga. 

White, Mary Lou China, Cuba 641 Redgate Ave., Norfork 7, Va. 

Whiteley, Martha D., R.N. ...North Africa 1002 Rural Ave., Williamsport, Pa. 

Whitmer, Harriet H China 18840 Riverside Dr., Birmingham, Mich. 

Wilcox, Alice A., R.N China 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Williams, Anna Bell Japan Vance, S. C. 

Wilson, Retta India 20% Perry, Union City, Pa. 

Winans, Mrs. Edward J. 

(Pearl B. Fosnot) Japan Aoyama Gakuin Nai, 22 Nudorigaoka-cho, Shibuya-ku, 

Tokyo, Japan 

Winslow, Annie S India 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Witham, Lois China 1439 N. Garfield Ave., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Wolfe, Evelyn M Brazil and Japan.. c/o Mrs. J. H. Lucas, 137 N. 17th St., Wheeling, W. Va. 

Woodruff, Frances E China Round Lake, N. Y. 

Woodruff, Mabel China Round Lake, N. Y. 

Youtsey, Edith China 1731 E. Lewis, Wichita 7, Kan. 

DEACONESSES HAVING THE RETIRED RELATIONSHIP 

NAME . ADDRESS 

Ackerman, Edith R 3811 E. 10th St., Long Beach 4, Calif. 

Adams, Grace G 4950 N. Ashland Ave., Apt. 222, Chicago 40, 111. 

Agans. Ethel M 70 Fairfield Ave., Trenton 8, N. J. 

Alford, Annie Box 73, Duck Hill, Miss. 



50 

NAME ADDRESS 

Allen, Pattie L The Methodist Home, Box 9217, Charlotte, N. C. 

Ard, Ethel M 275 Robincroft Drive, Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Armstrong, Catherine 2186 Glenbury St., Lakewood 7, Ohio 

Armstrong, Florence J 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Arnold, Charlotte 301 Main St., Penn Yan, N. Y. 

Arnold, Katharine S 615 W. Magnolia, San Antonio, Tex. 

Avery, Mildred 2946 S. W. 1st St., Miami 35, Fla. 

Baker, Athalia A 1995 Mantissa St., N. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Baker, Effie A 74% Blooming dale Ave., Saranao Lake, N. Y. 

Bane, Monta 411 Grant St., Normal, 111. 

Barbee, lone H 5343 Hamilton Ave., Cincinnati 34, Ohio 

Barber. Clara M St. Lawrence Hospital, Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Bate, Grace E 334 S. Atlantic Ave., Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Beadles, Bertha A 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Beardsley, Jennie 22 W. Erie St., Chicago It, IU. 

Beck, Minnie A Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 9, Ohio 

Beck, Roxana 115 N. Almansor St. , Alhambra, Calif. 

Benedict, Addie E 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Bengel, Catherine S Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Bennett, Ada Lee The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati 19, Ohio 

Bennett, Mro. Alice R 707 N. 30th, Billings, Mont. 

Bennett, Clara M 2324 Burlington Ave., St. Petersburg 6, Fla. 

Bennett, Flora B R. R. 2, Lenox, Iowa 

Berglund, H. Josephine 101 Smith St., Barre, Vt. 

Best, Mabel J Rt. 3, Box 600, Centralia, Wash. 

Bettenhausen, Catherine 237 St. Nicholas Ave., Brooklyn 37, N. Y. 

Binau, Hannah K Wesley Acres, 3520 Grand, Des Moines 12, Iowa 

Binggeli, Frieda L Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Bjornberg, Esther E 1437 Farragut Ave., Chicago 49, 111. 

Black, Mrs. Margaret C 27 Jane St., Paris, Ontario, Canada 

Boggs, Esther M 108 Perry Ave., Greenville, 8. C. 

Bowman, Rebecca Methodist Home for Aged, Concord, Mass. 

Bowman, Sarah A 184 W. Fort St., Farmington, 111. 

Brackebusch, Tillie Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Bradley, Mary 1 339 Quebec Ave., Toronto, Ontario, Canada 

Bradley, Rosa M Chelsea Methodist Home, Chelsea, Mich. 

Broecker, Sarah Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Brown, Alice Louise 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Brown, Minnie M Wesley Gardens, Des Moines, Wash. 

Brubaker, Mrs. Elizabeth A Erie School, Olive Hill, Ky. 

Buff ham , Mary E 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Bunn, Bessie 214 Talbot Ave., Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Burgess, Anna MiUtown, Ind. 

Burnton, Martha R.F.D. 2, Box 375, Lincoln Highway, Nixon, N. J. 

Burroway, Mrs. Emily Fox 1210 17th St.. N. W., Canton, Ohio 

Buss, Alma Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Butler, Mrs. Clara B 3807 Hawk, San Diego, Calif. 

Callaway, Eva M Elm Glen Farm, Conway, Mo. 

Campbell, Lila May Box 147, Rosenberg, Tex. 

Carl, Dixie F 340 S. Ridgewood Ave., Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Carpenter, Caroline 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Carpenter, Mary E 1309 E. Cocopah, Phoenix, Ariz. 

Carty, Bessie Home for Aged Women, Main St., Worchester, Mass. 

Chandler, Edith B 401 N. 5th, Austin, Minn. 

Chapin, Myrtle A 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. j. 

Church, Sarah D 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena «, Calif. 

Clifton, Lula 1 215 N. 12th Ave., Phoenix, Arts. 

Cline, Mildred H Chelsea Methodist Home, Chelsea, Mich. 

Collins, Martha J 12018 Abington Rd., Detroit 27, Mich. 

Colson, Susan D 9% Commonwealth Rd., Cochituate, Mass. 

Congleton, Jennie 219 E. Fourth St., Greenville, N. C. 

Corneliussen, Anna Princeton, Calif. 

Cosden, Frances A 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Cowles, Bertha 916 Charlotte, Kansas City, Mo. 

Cox, Bertha 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena I, Calif. 

Cramer, Hannah Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Crawford, Rena M 303 Howard St., Bridgeport, Ohio 

Crim, Dorothy 1433 Emory Rd., N. E. f Atlanta, Ga. 

Crothers, Arabella G 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Cunningham, Ethel B Rt. 1, Box 344, Elmore, Ala. 

Cunningham, Mattie M Rt. 1, Box 344, Elmore, Ala. 

Curry, Elizabeth Box I, Ashford, Ariz. 

Daniel, Mary 1760-C Filbert St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Davey, Gertrude M 110 New York Ave., Apt. fl-F, Brooklyn 33, N. Y. 

Davidson, Maryellen 15 W. Lamme, Boseman, Mont. 

Davies, Margaret 8 Box 137, Clinton, Ontario, Canada 

Davis, Elizabeth 216 8. Franklin St., Rocky Mount, N. C. 

DeMoss, Lillian 4617 Manordene Rd., Baltimore 29, Md. 

Detwiler, Mollie E 9% Commonwealth Rd., Cochituate, Mass. 

Dewey, Edith E Box 112, Millerton, Pa. 

Dodd, M. Dorothy c/o Dr. Walter Anthony, R. F. D. 5, Staunton, Va. 

Dorey, Nancy E 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Dowling, Ruth 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 



Deaconesses — Retired 51 

NAM! ADDRESS 

Driver, Mr*. Grace 1733 York, Memphis 18, Tenn. 

Duxbury, Elizabeth 146 Rounds Ave., Buffalo 15, N. Y. 

Eaton, Bess 990 Powhatan St., Arlington, Va. 

Eckerman, Marietta 22 W. Erie St., Chicago 10, 111. 

Eckley, Margaret 74 Cookman Ave. , Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Eddington, Jennie M 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Edwards, Lora B 405 14th St., N. W., Apt. 109, Albuquerque, N. M. 

Eliason, Clara J 1131 "I" St., Geneva, Neb. 

Ellis, Salli* 988 Cumberland, Clarksville, Tenn. 

Enders, Emma The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati 19, Ohio 

Eslinger, Florence 516 E. 8th St., Kinsley, Kans. 

Farringt on , Cornelia 74 Cookman Av*. , Ocean Gr*ve, N.J. 

Fawcett, Edna M 119 W. 2nd St., Spencer, Iowa 

Ferguson, Catherine L 98 S. Oak St., Pasadena, Calif. 

Finley, Mrs. Lorena 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Fleming, Isabel Casa de Manana, La Jolla, Calif. 

Fogle, Ruth A c/o Mrs. C. H. Van Meter, 1429 S. W. 14th, Portland 1. Ore. 

Ford, Amanda S 102 South St., Elkten, Md. 

France, Lillian G Deaconess Home, Concord, Mass. 

Freeman, Mrs. Mary E 121 Myrtle St., Elberton, Ga. 

Frey, Bina K 5 Glad* Ave.. Philippi, W. Va. 

Fries, Margaret 129 Loma Dr., Hermosa Beaeh, Calif. 

Fulmer, F. Fern The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati 19, Ohio 

Galliers, Laura 407 Benton Ave., East, Albia, Iowa 

Gasser, Jennie M 115 N. Almansor St., AJhambra, Calif. 

Gerber, Ida 237 St. Nicholas Avs., Brookly* 87, N. Y. 

Gerken, Agnes W 345 S. Park St., Casper, Wyo. 

Gibson, Helen 605 S. Orleans, Tampa, Fla. 

Glandon, Ethel V 1222 First Ave., SeattI* 1, Wash. 

Godbey, Cornelia 1020 Ann St., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Goodale, Bertha 74 Cookman Avs., Ocean Grovs, N. J. 

Gorby, Edith Box 342, Mitchell, Neb. 

Gordon, Mary E 1222 12th St., West, Bradenton, Fla. 

Granger, Mary V 5 Orchard St., Palmer, Mass. 

Grant, A. Vivian 246 Adelaide Av*., Providence 7, R. I. 

Greely, Addie B 2626 Poplar Springs Dr., Meridian, Miss. 

Green, Lottie Box 245, Brandford, Fla. 

Guenther, Katherine Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Guilkey, Ethel L 245 Robinson Road, Pasadena, Calif. 

Hahn, Emma Hillcrest Convalescent Home, 14 Northampton Ave., Springfield, Mass. 

Haines, Cora The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati 19, Ohio 

Hambright, Grace 3218 Girard Ave., S., Minneapolis 8, Minn. 

Hanson, Elisabeth M 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Harpst, Ethel Snead Junior College, Boas, Ala. 

Harris, Grace 1415 Foster Avs., Chicago 49, 111. 

Harter, Trella May 319 N. Jeffers*n St., Rochester, Ind. 

Hartline, Elsie A 1725 Prescott St., 8., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Harvey, Edna 74 Cookman At*.. Ocean Grov*, N. J. 

Hasler, Mary L 1046 S. F*rgus*n, Springfield, Mo. 

Haven, Nettie R Deaconess Home, Concord, Mass. 

Heard, Hyda Hotel Robert E. Lee, Winston- Salem, N. C. 

Heflin, C. Ruth 691 Miller St., Canton, Miss. 

Heilman, Carrie 237 St. Nicholas Ave., Brooklyn 37, N. Y. 

Heisler, Sarah B 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grov*, N. J. 

Henderson, Mrs. Carrie Adams 1578 W. 48th St., Los Angeles 62, Calif. 

Henry, Willena 4325 Caruth, Dallas, Tex. 

Hickman, Ida 419 N. Washington St., Iola, Kan. 

Hill, Juanita L Florida Methodist Children's Home, Enterprise, Fla. 

Hiner, Lulu 610 N. Hersey Ave., Beloit, Kan. 

Hirse, Belle 1415 Foster Ave., Chicage 40, 111. 

Hoag, Ida Mae 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Hoffman, Mrs. L. S 739 W. Main St., Lansdale, Pa. 

Hooper, Ella K Rosedale, La. 

Hope, B. Marion Box 643, Oak Bluffs, Mass. 

Hopkinson, Mabel 4175 Norfolk Terrace, Saa Diego 16, Calif. 

House, Emma C 590 Reed St., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Howard, Frances 1600 Westwood Ave., Richmond, Va. 

Howland, Charlotte 469 S. Second St., Evansville, Wis. 

Hubley, Virginia 250 8. Hollister Ave., Pasadena 5, Calif. 

Jackson, Ethel 99 Sunnyside Ave., Mill Valley, Calif. 

Jennings, Elizabeth 1973 St. Anthony Ave., St. Paul 4, Minn. 

Jericho, Mame 409 S. Jackson St., Mt. Pleasant, Iowa 

Johnston, Mary E 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Jones, C. Gertrude 541 Black At*., Springfield, 111. 

Kellogg, Mrs. Anna M 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Kennedy, Mabel 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Kinison, M. Blanche 1228 N. Anderso* St., Tacoma 6, Wash. 

Kling, Ida M 2567 41st St., S. W., Seattle 9, Wash. 

Knapp, Isabelle 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Kramer, Elizabeth Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Krause, Carrie Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Kulp, Donna L 4S5 Walnut At*., S. B.. Canton 2, Ohio 

Kuntz, Sophie 410 Fern St., New Orleans, La. 



52 

NAME ADDRESS 

Lakey, Julia A Carmen, Okla. 

Lancaster, Ruth E 88 Oaklee Village, Baltimore 24, Md. 

Landers, Sarah E 1168 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

Laney, Harriet E 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Lawton, Rae 22 W. Erie St., Chicago 10, 111. 

Lehman, A. Jennette 340 S. Ridgewood Ave., Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Lehnert, Mrs. Carrie Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Leighty, Edith 337 E. Washington, Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Leipersberger, Katherine Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Linfield, H. Grace 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Little, Agnes M Box 419, Winfield, Kans. 

Litzel, Louisa P 14351 Superior Rd., Cleveland Heights 18, Ohio 

Lockhart, Mary J 303 Howard St., Bridgeport, Ohio 

Lockwood, Minnie C 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Lowder, Sarah Rutherford College, N. C. 

McCoy, Eula M 1326 N. 6th St., Arkadelphia, Ark. 

McCulloch, Jane W 118 W. Comstock Ave., Winter Park, Fla. 

McCurry, Alice M 2153 Central Ave., Alameda, Calif. 

McFerrin, Alta 1152 Dean Ave., San Jose, Calif. 

McFerrin, Verna 1152 Dean Ave., San Jose, Calif. 

Mann, Frances 909 N. Avenue F, Lamesa, Tex. 

Maurer, Katharine R 1401 Jones St., San Francisco 9, Calif. 

Mecum, Anna 223V2 E. Lemon, Monrovia, Calif. 

Meredith, Helen Erie School, Olive Hill, Ky. 

Merwin, Grace E 74 Cookman Ave. , Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Miller, Mrs. Delia M 224 Park Bldg., Portland 5, Ore. 

Mitchell, Susie 209 W. Abram, Arlington, Tex. 

Moffet, Orpha B 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Moore, D. Glenn 1563 Unionport Rd., New York 62, N. Y. 

Morgan, Elma 403 S. Mesquite St., Arlington, Tex. 

Morgan, Olive M 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Morlock, Lillian 425 Dorchester Ave., Cincinnati 19, Ohio 

Morse, Lula R 3768 Perry St., Denver, Colo. 

Musselman, Martha 535 8th Ave., c/o Mrs. W. Froelich, Upland, Calif. 

Nestor, Anna K 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Nettleton, Grace 1415 Foster Ave., Chicago 40, 111. 

Neuendorf, Marie L Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Nicklas, Vera C 1147 N. W. 37th St., Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Northdurft, Minnie C Jackson, Mo. 

Olausen, Petra 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Oltmanns, Anna 19 W. 7th St., Hutchinson, Kan. 

Othiem, Mrs. Anna M 322 Ellis St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Ott, Bertha c/o Mrs. Monroe Lindeman, Industry, Tex. 

Packer, Grace Alice 542 S. Belmont, Wichita 9, Kan. 

Patterson, Lulu M 510 E. First St., Hutchinson, Kan. 

Pike, Minnie 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Piper, Helen 207 Stewart Homes, Helena, Mont. 

Pollom, Ethel 1211 S. Prospect, Tacoma 5, Wash. 

Porter, Caroline A 10767 Mountair Ave., Tujunga, Calif. 

Porter, Edith E 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Porter, Edith F Box 44, Sebec Village, Me. 

Pratt, Jessie A 1734 Menlo Ave., Los Angeles 6, Calif. 

Price, Annie 4040 Fourth St., Port Arthur, Tex. 

Ragle, Josie 3330 Manitou Ave., Los Angeles 31, Calif. 

Ragland, Margaret 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Randall, Lily L 5343 Hamilton Ave., Cincinnati 24, Ohio 

Rayson, Beulah 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Resseguie, Gertrude E 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Riel, Bertha A 184 W. Fort St., Farmington, 111. 

Rigg, Eva R. R. 3, Clay Center, Kan. 

Ritchie, A. Lucile The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati 19, Ohio 

Ritter, Mary E 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Ritz, Dorothy 222 Bank St., Batavia, N. Y. 

Robertson, Alice M 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Roesler, Emma C Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Roos, Lillian Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Russell, Harriet M 41 Clearfield Rd., Wethersfield, Conn. 

Ryan, Mary J 1055 Kingsley Ave., Los Angeles 29, Calif. 

Santee, Rosa 74 Cookman Ave. , Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Schaal, Gertrude 22 W. Erie St., Chicago 10, 111. 

Schacht, Helen 2505 S. Hope St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Schaich, Caroline Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Schimmelpfennig, Mathilda Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Schnickle, Frieda R. F. D. 1, Central City, Iowa 

Sebern, Florence 22 W. Erie St., Chicago 10, 111. 

Sells, Clara Mae Rt. 2, Box 312- A, Gulfport, Miss. 

Senrick, Lucy 181 Norton St., Long Beach 5. Calif. 

Shapland, Flora Grand Ridge, 111. 

Sheffer, Lillie R 109 Mt. Tabor Way, Ocean Grove, N. J 

Sherman, Melda 

Shoemaker, Mary E Box 113, Inwood, Iowa 

Smith, Alice M 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Smith, B. Lenora 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Smith, Demis 115 N. Almansor St.. Alhambra, Calif. 

Smith, Edith L 22 South St., Concord, N. H. 



Deaconesses — Retired 53 

NAMB ADDRESS 

Smith, Eugenia 403 S. Mesquite St., Arlington, Tex. 

Smith, Greta 22 W. Erie St., Chicago 10, 111. 

Smith, Mary F c/o Rev. Marien Holbert, Norcatur, Kan. 

Smith, Pearl H 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Smith, Vina 1415 Foster Ave., Chicago 40, 111. 

Solomon, Hannah Deaconess Home, Concord, Mass. 

Sorber, Flora A 22 W. Erie St., Chicago 10, 111. 

Souders, Vievie M 1753 S. Wichita St., Wichita, Kan. 

Spicer, Edith M The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati 19, Ohio 

Spicker, Lillian Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Spilker, Louise Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati 6, Ohio 

Steiner, Grace G 407 Decatur St., Cumberland, Md. 

Stephan, Edna M 38 Village Drive (Bethlehem), Wheeling, W. Va. 

Stewart, Mrs. Willa 14 Lincoln St., Winchester, Ky. 

Stroup, Nettie Rt. 1, Blue Ridge, Tex. 

Stroven, Katherine 17 E. Oak St., Fremont, Mich. 

Swartz, Cartes K 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Swift, Ella L 5975 Rainier Ave., Seattle 8, Wash. 

Tarr, Ada M 141 S. 53rd Avenue, Los Angeles 42, Calif. 

Taylor, Elizabeth 330 William Rd., N., Chilliwack, B. C, Canada 

Teachman, Corabelle 99 Warren Ave., Brockton 19, Mass. 

Teel, Susie Box 58, Terrell, Tex. 

Tibbetts, Iva 934 Church St., Flint 3, Mich. 

Tibbetts, Pearl W Wesley Court No. 5, Marionville, Mo. 

Tinsley, Lois 1010 Duncan Ave., Perry, Ga. 

Tipsword, May Methodist Old People's Home, Lawrenceville, 111. 

Tirsell, Ida 217 W. Lake St., Minneapolis 8, Minn. 

Trawick, Annie Opelika, Ala. 

Trimble, May W 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 8, Calif. 

Trumbull, Georgiana 3806 N. 41st St., Milwaukee 10, Wis. 

Trumbull, Jennie 1228 N. Anderson St., Tacoma 6., Wash. 

Vanek, Ethel T 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Vann, Florence 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Van Scyoc, Bessie K 26 Nutt Ave., Uniontown, Pa. 

Vogel, Emma Gracemont, Okla. 

Vose, Agnes E 2878 Maricopa Ave., Richmond, Calif. 

Waddell, Evelyn 212 Tipton St., Covington, Tenn. 

Waelchli, Anna M Alder Strasae 38, Zurich 8, Switzerland 

Walden, Cecile B 16 Monroe Heights, Cortland, N. Y. 

Walther, Emily E 115 N. Almansor St., Alhambra, Calif. 

Warrington, Martha K 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Watts, Mrs. Bithiah Reed Rt. 2, Harriman, Tenn. 

Watts, Donna E 1525 W. 90th St., Seattle 77, Wash. 

Weigle, Rebecca A 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Whipple, Bernice 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Whitehead, Mrs. Grace Gatewood 3233 Calumet St., Houston, Tex. 

Whiteside, Florence 533 W. Monroe, Magnolia, Ark. 

Williams, Fannie Belle 4028 Park Ave., Gary, Ind. 

Williams, Marilla B 9206 Harvard Blvd., Los Angeles 47, Calif. 

Williamson, Mary E 148 S. Harrison Ave., Kankakee, 111. 

Willings, Ollie Eloy Community Center, Box 902, Eloy, Ariz. 

Willmarth, Minnie 1415 Foster Ave.. Chicago 40, 111. 

Wilson, Caroline P 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Wirtz, Wilhelmina 1426 Morgan St., Keokuk, Iowa 

Womack, Mollie 102 Fifth St., Las Animas, Colo. 

Woodside, Grace 1415 Foster Ave., Chicago 40, 111. 

Worrell, Irene Metcalfe Community House, Rt. 1, Dunbar, Pa. 

Yates, Elizabeth 24 Garden Dr., Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Yoakam, Grace 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Young, Ethel 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

RETIRED HOME MISSIONARIES 

NAME ADDRESS 

Alexander, Mary T 2512 Harden St., Savannah, Ga. 

Bell, Louisa A 1115 E. Claremont St., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Brandeberry, Emma 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Bryant, R. Francina 210 Garden St., Orlando, Fla. 

Comfort, E. Mae 74 Cookman Ave., Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Harms, Frances S Box 157, Baldwin City, Kan. 

Hicks, Eva E Rt. 1. Box 474, Red Bluff, Calif. 

Howard, Mrs. Estella 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 6, Calif. 

Hurd, Georgia A 2512 Harden St., Savannah, Ga. 

Jakes, Clara E 4412 Oakwood Ave., Los Angeles 4, Calif. 

Jones, Isabelle R 340 College St., Asheville, N. C. 

Keech, Mabel 1415 Foster Ave., Chicago 40, III. 

Mathias, Jennie 1055 N. Kingsley Dr., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Orvis, Edith E 705 E. Front St., Berwick, Pa. 

Pittard, Mary J 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 8, Calif. 

Smith, Olive L Rt. 1, Box 1050, Paradise, Calif. 

Smith, Mrs. Winifred M 1033 N. Second Ave., Tucson, Ariz. 

Snell, Mrs. Nelle Herbst 1760 S. 17th St., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Stevens, Mrs. Cora D Box 113, Canaan, Conn. 

Stryker, Veda 169 Church St., Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Winchell, Mary E 275 Robincroft Dr., Pasadena 8, Calif. 



54 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS— National 



Florida — 

Boylan-Haven School, 1214 Jessie St., Jackson- 
ville 6, Fla. 

Founded: 1886 
Enrollment: 160 
*Mrs. Edith M. Carter, M.A., Superintendent, 
Principal 
Mrs. Mattie C. Allen, B.S., Secretary- 
Mrs. Josie Ayer, R.N., Assistant Superin- 
tendent, Nurse 
Marian Brown, B.A., Art 
Ramona Cook, Dormitory Supervisor 
Mrs. Annie Everett, B.S., Seventh Grade 
Hattie Farrier, B.S., Physical Education 
Mrs. Lillian Glover, B.S., Science 
Mrs. Mary Green, B.S., Eighth Grade 
Laura Guinart, B.S., Mathematics 
Mary Alyce Guyton, B.S., Social Studies 
Mrs. Juanita Jackson, B.S., Kindergarten 
Mrs. Jane Jefferson, B.S., Dormitory Super- 
visor 
Edna Maupin, B.A., Financial Secretary 
Mrs. A. G. Morgan, B.Mus., Music 
Mary E. Morse, M.A., Librarian 
Virginia Ogles, B.A., Spanish, Dining Room 

Hostess 
Glenna Owens, B.S., Dietitian 
tBeverly Root, B.S., Foods, Lunchroom 
*Nola Smee, M.A., Preparatory Bible, Reading 
Mrs. Gwendolyn Stewart, B.A., Kindergarten 
Ethel Thomas, Latin, French 
Emma H. Varner, B.A., English, Typing 
•Avis Wallace, M.A., Music 

Methodist Student Center 
§Florida State University, Tallahassee, Fla. 

Work Opened : 1927 
Methodist Students: 1,647 
Rev. Austin E. Holladv, B.D., Director 
705 Jefferson St., Tallahassee, Fla. 

Georgia — 

§Clark College, Atlanta 4, Ga. 
Founded: 1870 
Enrollment: 811 
Faculty Members: 68 
James P. Brawley, Sc.D., President 
Mrs. Phoebe F. Burney, M.R.E., Dean of 

Women, Religious Education 
Mrs. Flora G. Davis, M.A., Home Economics 
Mrs. Eva S. Martin, M.A., Director, Holmes 

Hall 
Sophia Monroe, M. A., Director, Merner Hall 
F. Frances Neely, B.S.H., Home Economics 

§Paine College, Augusta, Ga. 
Founded: 1883 
Enrollment: 300 
Faculty Members: 37 
Rev. E. Clayton Calhoun, B.D., President 
•Ruth L. Bartholomew, Ph.D., English (on 

leave) 
•Evelyn Bern', B.D., Religion 
Rev. W. L. Bumngton, M.A., Faith Cabin 

Libraries 
W. C. Ervin, Business Manager 
Emma C. W. Gray, M.A., English 
•Frances Peacock, English 

*Cecilia Sheppard, Ph.D., Philosophy, Re- 
ligion 

Vashti School, Thomasville, Ga. 
Founded: 1903 
Enrollment: 118 
Rev. Woodward Adams, Superintendent 



•Ruth E. Adams, B.A., English 
Mrs. Abbie Atlee, Dormitory Supervisor 
Mrs. Mary Bass, Dining Room Hostess 
Mrs. Mae Bivans, Nurse 

•Naomi Coger, H.E., Home Economics 
Mrs. Adele Dahlberg, Dormitory Supervisor 

*Lillian Day, Religious Education, Bible 

•Mabel Edgerton, Administrative Assistant 

*Ora Hooper, M.A., Library, Science 

*Erma Jenkins, M.A., Principal 

JAlice Jefferson, M.M., Music 
Esther Jones, B.A., Mathematics 

tMildred Esther Jones, B.A., Social Studies 
Mrs. Donia King, Dormitory Supervisor 
Mrs. Tempie Mallory, Bookkeeper 
Mrs. Edith Muller, B.S., Industrial Arts 
Mrs. Amy Surgnier, Dietitian 

Mane Wilkinson, B.S., Fifth, Sixth Grades 

Kentucky — 

Erie School, Olive Hill, Ky. 

Founded: 1913 
Enrollment: 121 

Mrs. Gertrude G. Hess, Superintendent 
*Mrs. Elizabeth A. Brubaker, Assistant 
Mildred Burdon, B.A., Music 
tJoyce L. Burress, B.A., First, Second Grades 
{Margaret Croft, B.S., English 
'Esther Edwards, B.A., Dietitian 
Mrs. Elizabeth Elam, Housemother 
Ralph Forney, M.A., Science, Mathematics 
Kathleen Fugitt, B.A., Home Economics 
tMargaret Gamble, B.A., Third, Fourth Grades 
tJames L. Ivey, M.A., Principal 
•Edna Jones, B.A., Mathematics, Business 
•Helen Meredith, B.A., Librarian 
Diana Miller, Religious Education, Bible 
Mrs. Lelia Moore, Assistant Dietitian 
•Myrtle Pylman, B.A., Fifth, Sixth Grades 
•Grace Reuter, B.S., Seventh, Eighth Grades 
Mrs. Elizabeth Spears, Housemother 
Todd Tennyson, B.A., Coach, Physical Edu- 
cation 
Thomas D. Wogaman, B.A., Social Science, 
Boys' Houseparent 

Sue Bennett College, London, Ky. 

Founded: 1896 
Enrollment: 236 

*Oscie Sanders, M.A., President 
Mrs. Nora Belle, B.A., Dietitian 
Clyde W. Blackburn, B.A., Coach, Education 
Mrs. Dora Browning, M.A., Business 
Estill Davidson, M.A., Elementary School 
Charles Melvin Denney, M.A., Social Science, 

Boys' Dormitory 
Lisa Frederiksson, M.A., Arts, Crafts 

•Jennie Flood, M.A., Bible, Rural Work 
Fannie Harmon, M.A., Science 
Earl Hays, M.S., Dean, Agriculture 
Mrs. Elaine Hays, M.S., Home Economics, 

Physical Education 
Mrs. Lucy Plybon, Hostess, Boys' Dormitory 
Mrs. Opal Reynolds, M.A., Elementary School 
Julia Hoffman Rose, M.A., Librarian 
Wilson Seay, B.A., English 
Bernard Stallard, B.A., English 
Mrs. Leticia Taylor, M.A., Language Arts 
Mrs. Raleigh Trosper, Girls' Dormitory 
Velma L. Vincent, B.A., Registrar, Secretary 
Janrose Wilson, B.A., Elementary School 
Roy Wilson, M.Ed., Mathematics, Physics. 



•Deaconess tU.S.-2 {Transferred from Dept. of Work in Foreign Fields §In cooperation with other boards 



Workers and Projects in Educational Institutions 



55 



Louisiana — 

Methodist Student Center 
§Louisiana Polytechnic Institute, Ruston, La. 
Work Opened: 1941 
Methodist Students: 593 
*Pearlye Maye Kelley, B.D., Student Coun- 
selor, Box 34, Tech Station, Ruston, La. 

Methodist Student Center 
§ Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, 
La. 

Work Opened: 1940 
Methodist Students: 439 
Ann Adams, B.A., Student Counselor, Box 
1244, College Station, Natchitoches, La. 

Methodist Student Center 
§ Southwestern Louisiana Institute, Lafayette, 
La. 

Work Opened : 1940 
Methodist Students : 297 
Ted B. Tether, M.A., Student Counselor, Box 
220, Lafayette, La. 

Sager-Brown Home and Godman School, Bald- 
win, La. 

Founded: 1921 
Enrollment: 173 

flRosie Ann Cobb, B.S., Superintendent, Prin- 
cipal 
Elnora Bernard, Kitchen Supervisor 
Mary G. Greene, B.A., Kindergarten 
Mrs. Evelyn Hook, Dormitory Supervisor 
Rev. A. L. Hook, Maintenance 
Patsy Isidore, Dormitory Supervisor 
Eileen Jonas, B.A., First, Second Grades 
Chaney B. Prevost, B.A., Eighth Grade, 

Music 
*Lelia M. Robinson, M.A., Fifth, Sixth Grades 
tPhoebe A. Reynolds, B.A., Seventh Grade 
Evelyn R. Thomas, Third, Fourth Grades 

Mississippi — 

Rust College, Holly Springs, Miss. 
Founded: 1806 
Enrollment: 922 
Faculty Members : 60 
L. M. McCoy, Litt.D., President 

Wood Junior College, Mathiston, Miss. 
Founded: 1886 
Enrollment: 120 
Charles T. Morgan, M.A., President 
Sara Jo Faucette, Boarding Hall Director 
Wayne Gaddis, M.A., Mathematics, Science 
Mrs. Wayne Gaddis, M.A., Business Educa- 
tion 
*Sylvia Huitema, B.S., Financial Secretary 
Mrs. Glenna Kwok, M.A., Basic Communica- 
tion 
Robert Latham, M.S., Social Studies, Dean, 

Registrar 
Mrs. C. T. Morgan, M.A., Humanities, 

Drama 
J. E. Nichols, B.S., Coach, Health 
William Perryman, M.M., Music, Choir 
J. M. Pierce, Farm Supervisor 
Mrs. J. R. Priest, Director, Wood Hall 
Hays Stewart, Maintenance 
Mrs. Zudie B. Tolley, Secretary to President 
Carol Webb, M.S., Science 



Missouri — 

National College foh Christian Workers, 5123 
Truman Rd., Kansas City 27, Mo. 
Founded: 1899 
Enrollment: 112 

Lewis B. Carpenter, D.D., President 

Louis Abney, Ed.D., Speech 

Anita Aldrich, M.A., Physical Education 
*GIadice Bower, M.S., Dean of Women, 
English 

Herley C. Bowling, M.A., Public Relations 

W. D. Bryant, Ph.D., Social Science 

H. C. Davidson, B.S., Business Manager 

DeWitt C. Ellinwood, Jr., M.A., Dean of 

Men, History 
*Vera R. Falls, M.A., Director, Rural Exten- 
sion 

Ethel C. French, R.N., Nurse, Assistant Head 
Resident 
*Frieda M. Gipson, Ed.D., Psychology, Reg- 
istrar 

Bernice N. Gonzalez, M.A., Language 

Mrs. Bernice Helmuth, Head Resident, Dieti- 
tian 

John W. Johannaber, Ph.D., Luella F. 
Stewart Bible Chair 

Irene Linder, Ph.D., Sociology 

Mrs. William Longmire, B.M., Voice 

Irene Murphy, Ph.D., English 
*Kathryn Newcomb, B.A., Director of Admis- 
sions, Alumni Sceretary 

John Paul, M.M., Music 

Mrs. Verna Rensvold, B.S., Recreational 
Leadership 

Clarence Sinclair, M.A., Natural Science 

Raymond Sauder, B.A., Physical Education, 
Administrative Assistant 

Richard C. Shanor, S.T.B., Religious Educa- 
tion 

LaRue Sowers, M.A., Librarian 

Lewis B. Van Winkle, Ed. D., Academic Dean 

New Mexico — 

Harwood Girls' School, 1114 Seventh St., N.W., 
Albuquerque, N. M. 
Founded: 1887 
Enrollment : 160 
Dorothy Marie Watson, M.A., Superintendent 
Ruth Collins, Financial Secretary 
Kathryn Crissey, M.A., Spanish, American 

History 
Marion Crissey, B.A., Core 7, Art 
*Lora Edwards, B.A., Dining Room Hostess 
*Helen Fennema, M.A., Core 8, Physical Edu- 
cation, Mathematics 
Mrs. Anna Fink, Dormitory Director 
lone Gandy, Dormitory Supervisor 
Laurinda Hampton, M.A., English, Library 
Mrs. Nancy S. Hawley, Music 
Ernest Henderson, Maintenance 
♦Lillie J. Hendricks, M.A., Fifth, Sixth Grades 
Mrs. Feme Holloway, Dormitory Supervisor 
Mrs. Lulu Kuhns, B.A., Bible 
Mrs. Daisy LaGrone, Clothing 
Mrs. Nettie Lane, Dormitory Supervisor 
Mrs. Donna M. Lear, Commercial 
Ruth Picazo, B.A., Third, Fourth Grades 
*Ethel Pryor, B.S., Dietitian 
*Laura Robbins, B.A., Dormitory Supervisor 
Deloris Robinson, B.A., First, Second Grades 
Golda Tague, B.A., English, Biology 
*Sue Watts, M.A., Mathematics 
Mrs. Bonnie Wynn, B.A., Home Economics 

Navajo Methodist Mission School, Box 877, Farm- 
ington, N. M. 

Founded: 1890 
Enrollment: 233 

Willard P. Bass, M.A., Superintendent 
Norma Adams, R. N., Dormitory Supervisor 



'Deaconess. 



fiHome Missionary. tU.S.-2. §In cooperation with other boards. 



56 



Wilfred E. Billey, B.A., Industrial Arts 
Mrs. Wilfred Billey, Dormitory Supervisor 
May Briggs, B.A., Fourth Grade 
Gloria Brockington, B.S., Music 
C. C. Brooks, LL.D., Bookkeeper 
Mrs. C. C. Brooks, B.A., Assistant Secretary 
Robert Brooks, S.T.B., Religious Education 
Leland Dellinger, Supervisor, Grade Boys 

*Etta Devine, B.S., Dormitory Supervisor 
Dorothy Dunbar, Secretary, Home Economics 

'Barbara Dunker, R.N., Nurse 
Mrs. Grace Garnaat, Dormitory Supervisor 
Allen Gleason, Maintenance Assistant 
Mrs. Allen Gleason, Assistant Cook 
Rev. Ben Hamilton, B.A., Supervisor, Grade 

Boys 
Mrs. Ben Hamilton, Dormitory Supervisor 
Marilyn Hardy, M.R.E., Seventh Grade 
Mrs. Mildred Hogue, Baker 

*Mabel Huffman, B.A., Second, Third Grades 

*Delaris Johnson, M.A., Eighth Grade 
Margaret Kelly, Dormitory Supervisor 
William M. Malehorn, M.A., High School 

Principal 
Mrs. William M. Malehorn, B.A., English, 

Librarian 
Christine McBride, Dormitory Supervisor 
Verlin Metzger, B.A., Farm Supervisor 
Mrs. Verlin Metzger, Pre-first, First Grades 
Max Norman, B.S., Mathematics, Coach 

*Mary Louise Piper, B.S., Fifth Grade 
David E. Tutt, Supervisor, Grade Boys 
Mrs. David E. Tutt, B.S., Business Educa- 
tion 
Byron Tharp, B.S., Farm Supervisor, Main- 
tenance 
Mrs. Byron Tharp, B.A., Science, Mathe- 
matics 
Mrs. Florence White, Cook 

'Helen Wolfarth, B.A., Sixth Grade 

Bisti School and Community Center 
Founded: 1946 
Enrollment : 60 

'Doris Bloomster, M.A., Second, Third Grades 

Mrs. Helen Arthur, Cook 

Mrs. Mary Dixon, Dormitory Supervisor 
*Twila Hahn, B.S., Pre-first, First Grades 

Mrs. Josephine Hanson, B.S., Dormitory 
Supervisor 



North Carolina — 

Allen High School, 331 College St., Asheville, 
N. C. 

Founded: 1887 
Enrollment : 144 

Mrs. Claire Lennon, Superintendent 

Mrs. Izora Bagley, M.A., English, Social 

Studies 
tChrystal Baker, B.S., Music 
*01a Lee Barnett, M.A., Religious Education, 

Mathematics 
*Cynthia Brooks, M.A., Business Education 
Mrs. Lucille Burton, B.S., Home Economics, 

Clothing 
Shirley Dean, B.A., Junior High 
Mrs. Marion Dennison, B.S., Financial Secre- 
tary 
Jennie Hann, B.A., Dormitory Supervisor 
Rosella Hill, B.A., English, French 
Josephine Litchfield, B.A., Librarian, English 
Fred Miller, B.S., Dietitian 
Frances Mills, Laundry Supervisor 
Virginia Priest, B.A., Science, Latin 
Mrs. Mary Searcy, B.A., Dormitory Super- 
visor 
Marguerite Sells, B.S., Home Economics, 
Foods 



Valentine Smith, B.S., Science 
fl.Julia Titus, M.A., Principal 

Ruth Walther, M.A., Mathematics, Assistant 

Principal 
'Winifred Wrisley, M.A., Music 

Methodist Student Center 
East Carolina College, Greenville, N. C. 
Work Opened : 1936 

Methodist Students: 3,000 

*Mamiej Chandler, B.A., Director 
501 E. Fifth St., Greenville, N. C. 

§ Bennett College, Greensboro, N. C. 
Founded: 1926 
Enrollment : 467 
Faculty : 66 
Willa B. Player, LL.D., President 

Pfeiffer College, Misenheimer, N. C. 
Founded: 1903 
Enrollment : 485 

J. Lem Stokes, II, Ph.D., President 

Louise Allen, M.Ed., Business Administration 

Clyde Alligood, Host 

Mrs. Clyde Alligood, Hostess 

Mary Eleanor Bethea, M.A., Dean of Women, 

Religion 
Hoyt E. Bowen, Ph.D., English 
Maud S. Caldwell, R.N., Nurse 
Julius G. Campbell, M.A., English 
Phoebe A. Crary, M.Ed., Physical Education 
Daisy L. Cotton, M.A., English 
William D. Cotton, Ph.D., Social Studies 
Mrs. Bertha Cox, B.S., Hostess 
Rachel Curlee, B.A., Secretary 
Carsene W. Elijah, B.A., Business Administra- 
tion 
Juliet Endly, B.S., Assistant Librarian 
Joe Ferrebee, M.A., Physical Education 
Chlo Fink, M.A., English 
*Mary F. Floyd, M.A., Religion 
Charles Foreman, Ph.D., Biology 
Ralph W. Gable, Ph.D., Chemistry 
Mrs. Erin Gamble, Hostess 
Peggy Garrison, M.A., Chemistry 
Walter I. Gibson, Vice-President 
G. Lester Gray, M.A., Social Studies 
Georgia Haswell, M.A., Mathematics 
Fred T. Hollis, M.A., Social Studies 
Kenneth D. Holshouser, B.A., Registrar 
Mrs. Martha Holshouser, Secretary 
Dwight H. Ives, Th.M., Fine Arts 
Virginia Ives, Assistant, Fine Arts 
N. E. Lefko, M.A., Physical Education 
Mrs. Faye McDonald, Hostess 
Jethro O. Manly, Ph.D., Biology 
Wallace W. Martin, M.A., Business Admin- 
istration 
Rodney Miller, M.A., Physical Education 
G. Nelson Moore, D.D., Public Relations 
H. L. Murray, M.D., Physician 
Mrs. Louis Peck, B.A., Hostess 
Ruby P. Roberts, Hostess 
Murat Roberts, Ph.D., Languages 
Clyde Robertson, Ph.D., Biology 
James W. Rose, M.A., Physical Education 
Bernard Russell, Ph.D., Religion 
George M. Schreyer, Ph.D., Religion 
Wilbur T. Scrivnor, M.M., Music 
Norma Scrivnor, Hostess 
Elizabeth Shaffer, M.A., Languages 
Henry H. Shissler, Ph.D., Sociology 
H. Keith Slothower, M.A., Speech Arts 
Mamie Slothower, M.A., Education, Psy- 
chology 
William C. Stone, M.M., Music 
Fay H. Stovall, B.A., Business Administration 



•Deaconess. 



11 Home Missionary. 



tU.S.-2. §In cooperation with other boards. 



Workers and Projects in Educational Institutions 



57 



Hugh Stricter, Chef 
Margaret Stuckey, M.A., English 
Thelma Venters, B.D., Greek, Secretary 
Aline Ward, M.A., English 
Bimitri E. Wassen, Ph.D., Business Admin- 
istration 
Cameron West, Ed.D., Education, Psychology 
Paul M. Wheeler, Ph.D., Academic Dean 
W. Heath Williams, Business Manager 
Paul Widenhouse, Host 
Mrs. Paul Widenhouse, Hostess 
Sue Yarborough, B.A., Speech Arts 
Mrs. Yarborough, Hostess 
Mrs. Buna M. Yelton, Dietitian 
John Yelton, Assistant Chef 

South Carolina — 

Browning Home and Mather Academy, Camden, 
S. C. 

Founded: 1886 
Enrollment: 170 
Eubulus L. Marsh, B.S., Acting Superin- 
tendent and Principal 
Mrs. Cherry Belton, Nurse 
Virginia Carter, B.A., Relief Teacher 
Mrs. Willie Cook, Nursery 
Mrs. Mabel T. Gill, B.A., Office Secretary 
Evelyn Gittens, B.S., Home Economics, Sew- 
ing 
*Mary E. Glendinning, B.A., Dietitian 
J. R. Harper, B.S., Industrial Arts 
Mrs. Eva Heath, Second Floor Supervisor 
Mrs. Mae Dee Johnson, B.S., English 
Survada Kennedy, B.A., Science 
Mrs. Amelia A. Kirkland, Boys' Supervisor 
Glendene Van Landingham, B.A., Social 
Science, English 
*M. Edna Lukens, B.S., Financial Secretary, 

Bible 
Mrs. Dorothy Marsh, B.S., Kindergarten 
Eddie C. McGirt, M.A., Science, Coach 
Mrs. Mozelle McCullough, Supervisor 
Eugene Nesbit, B.A., French, English 
Theodora Rippetoe, B.A., Laundry Supervisor 
Mrs. Evelyn Sanders, B.S., Librarian 
Thelma Walker, B.S., Home Economics, 

Foods 
Thomas Whitaker, B.S., Science, Assistant 
Coach 

Tennessee — 

§Scarritt College Foe Christian Workers, Nash- 
ville 5, Tenn. 

Founded: 1892 
Enrollment: 146 
Foye G. Gibson, D.D., President 
C. A. Bates, Supervisor, Buildings and 

Grounds 
Ina C. Brown, Ph.D., Social Anthropology 
*Rosa May Butler, S.M.M., Church Music 
James W. Carty, Jr., B.D., Religious Jour- 
nalism 
Opal J. Cleaveland, M.Sc, Social Group 

Work, Recreation 
Alice L. Cobb, M.A., Church and Community 
*Roma A. Cupp, M.Sc, Social Group Work_ 
E. E. Edling, B.D., Maintenance, Housing 

Department 
Rhoda C. Edmeston, Ph.D., Old Testament, 

Latin American Missions 
Larry Eisenberg, B.D., Recreation 
*Betsy Ewing, M.A., Alumni Secretary, Public 
Relations 
Mary Joan Finger, B.S., Librarian 
Carrie Lou Goddard, M.E., Religious Educa- 
tion 
*Betty Ruth Goode, M.A., Social Group Work 
Mrs. H. D. Harrison, Assistant Director, 
Housing 



"Deaconess 



§In cooperation with other boards 



Mattie Sue Howell, M.A., Religious Education 
Betty Hunt, Secretary to President 
Henry M. Johnson, Ph.D., Psychology, Reli- 
gious Education, Academic Dean 
Mrs. William A. McGavock, Director, Housing 
Delbert M. Mann, M.A., Sociology 
Arthur L. Mansure, Ph.D., Literature, His- 
tory of Bible 
Mrs. Lillian Mayes, Secretary to Dean 
Edythe Moore, M.A., Assistant Bursar 
Vivian C. Morter, M.A., Linguistics 
Mrs. Mary E. O'Neal, M.Sc, Dietitian 
Mary C. Owen, Ph.D., Dean of Women 
Lindsey P. Pherigo, Ph.D., Christian Life 

and Thought 
Gordon G. Starr, M.A., Registrar, Bursar 
Earl W. Stevick, Ph.D., Linguistics, Special 

Missions 
Richard C. Stuntz, M.D., College Physician 
Elizabeth Tittsworth, M.A., Vocational and 
Student Work, Director, Student Recruit- 
ment 
*Betty Jo Vaughn, B.A., Assistant Registrar 
James H. Warren, M.A., Speech, Religious 

Drama 
Margaret Watson, B.A., Infirmary Director 
Leonard T. Wolcott, Ph.D., Missions 
Louise Young, M.A., Sociology 

§ Tennessee Wesleyan College, Athens, Tenn. 
(Administering Ritter Hall) 
Enrollment of College: 542 
Enrollment of Ritter Hall: 72 
LeRoy A. Martin, D.D., President of College 
Reba Parsons, Superintendent, Ritter Hall 
Mrs. Lawrence Walker, Dietitian 
Reva Puett, M.A., Assistant Dietitian, Home 

Economics 
Mrs. Sue Davis, R.N., Nurse 

Texas — 

Holding Institute, Laredo, Tex. 
Founded: 1880 
Enrollment : 104 
Victor Cruz-Aedo, M.A., Superintendent 
Magdalena Cruz-Aedo, Bookstore, Cafeteria 
Esteban Cuellar, Building Supervisor 
Virginia De La Garza, Secretary 
Cesar Garza, B.A., Special English 
Oma Mae Gee, B.A., English 
Cornelia Gilbert, B.A., Home Economics, Art 
*Ura Leveridge, M.A., Librarian, Dietitian 
Adolph Lopez, Social Science, Bible 
Mary Lou Santillan, B.A., Commercial 
Tafolla Olivia, Dietitian 
Servando Trevino, B.A., Mathematics 
W. B. Weatherford, D.C., Science 

§ Huston -Tillotson College, Austin, Tex. 

(Eliza Dee Hall, 1203 East Avenue, Austin 
2, Tex.**) 

United College Merged : 1952 
Eliza Dee Hall, Founded: 1904 
Eliza Dee Hall, Enrollment: 42 
John J. Seabrook, President of College 
*Carmen Lowry, M.S., Superintendent, Eliza 

Dee Hall 
Mrs. Almetris M. Duren, B.S., Dormitory 

Assistant 
Mrs. Margaret T. McCracken, Dietitian 

Kieby Hall (University of Texas), 306 W. 29th 
St., Austin, Tex. 
Founded: 1925 

Enrollment: 114 
Mrs. Irene T. Powers, Director 

**A residence for the University of Texas 



58 



WEST INDIES 
Dominican Republic — 

Interdenominational Work. Under the Board for 
Christian Work in Santo Domingo 
Founded: 1920 
Maurice Daily, M.A., Director, Religious and 

Educational Program 
Mildred Lamberts, R.N., Director, Health 
Program 

Puerto Rico — 

George O. Robinson School and Kindergartens, 
Santurce 34, Puerto Rico 
Founded: 1902 

Enrollment: Robinson School, 325 
Day Schools, 883 

*Helen Aldrich, Superintendent 

•Doris Armes, B.L.S., Librarian 
Bessie Brinson, M.A., Special English 
Isabel Calderon, Home Economics 

tRuth Clark, B.A., First Grade 
Agustin Echevaria, B.S., Mathematics 
Kelvin Espada, B.A., Physical Education, 

Shop 
Elsa Davila, B.A., Social Studies 
Mrs. Bessie Fleckman, M.A., Principal 
Arlyn Vazquez, Girls' Physical Education 
Alma Hernandez, B.A., Science, Mathematics 

flBernice Huff, M.A., Kindergarten 
Mrs. Antonia Irlanda, Dormitory Supervisor 
Miriam Kettler, B.A., Spanish, French 
William Martin, B.D., Religious Education 
Mrs. Esther Nunez, Elementary Spanish 
Mrs. Eloisa Paige, B.S., Spanish, French 
Mrs. Ruth Reaves, Fifth Grade 
Mrs. Carmen Rivera, Housekeeper 
Teodoro Rivera, B.S., Science 
Ysmenia Scalco, Secretatry 

*Ilo Stewart, B.A., Sixth Grade 

*Mrs. Gladys Stoughton, B.A., Third Grade 
Larry Stoughton, B.A., English 
Nelida Vazquez, Secretary 
Harriet Englerth, M.S., Second Grade 
Beatrice Williamson, B.A., Fourth Grade 

Day Schools— Puerto Rico 

Mrs. Lydia Colon, Supervisor, Primary Schools 
flBernice Huff, Supervisor, Kindergartens 

Aibonito 
Violeta Vazquez 

Barrio Obrero 
Gertrudis Escobar 
Maria Cora de Hernandez 

Campbell, Rio Piedras 
Margarita Toro de Conde 

McKinley, San Juan 
Edith Delgado 
Esther Ortiz 

Murray, Puerta De Tierra 
Demaris Colon 

Patillas 
Rosa Maria Ortiz 

Playa de Ponce 

Rosin Bocachica 

Marina Castrero 

Raquel Collazo 
Ponce 

Angelina Sanchez 

Isa Cruz 

San Jose 
Jesusa Rivera Lopez 

San Juan Moderno 
Ana Berrios de Jesus 



Santurce 

Emma Gonzalez 
Villa Palmeras 

Carmen Santiago 

Gregoria Benitez 

Carmen Aida Gonzalez 

Sara S. de Molina 

Gladys Santiago 

Abigail Williams 

Mrs. Luis Maldonado 

St. Croix 

Erna Elliott 
•Dorothy Kelley 
Nancy Ayala 

Vieques Clinic 
Mrs. Juanita Santos 
Mrs. Josephine Torres 
Note: Because of limited space only a brief list of 
staff members in some cooperative institutions 
has been printed. 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

Conference 

Iowa — 

§Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa (Iowa-Des 
Moines Conference) 
Work Opened: 1926 
Methodist Students: 2,000 
Dean G. Walters, D.D., Minister of Students 

.Michigan — 
§ Protestant Foundation for Intbbnational Stu- 
dents, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Founded: 1947 

Enrollment: Foreign Students, 1,089 
Mrs. Doris R. Rumman, B.A., Director 

Virginia — 

§Ferrum Junior College, Ferrum, Va. 
Founded: 1913 
Enrollment: 187 
C. Ralph Arthur, B.D., President 
Carson Barnes, B.A., Assistant to Dean, His- 
tory, Athletics 
Philip L. Carpenter, M.S., Science 
Lyman Carrier, M.A., Agriculture 
Madge Ann Conwell, M.A., Education, Psy- 
chology 
Anna L. Cox, B.A., Nurse, Health, Hygiene 
Gene Holdredge, B.D., Rural Studies, Phi- 
losophy, Director of Extension Division 
Minna L. Irby, B.S., College Secretary, Com- 
mercial 
Oliver Isaac, B.A., Librarian, English 
T. D. Kelly, B.D., Chaplain, Bible, Director, 

Public Relations 
Robert Lacy, M.A., Business Administration, 

Director, Work Program 
Paul C. Y. Lee, M.A., Mathematics 
Robert Magill, Jr., M.A., Languages 
•Elisabeth Pryor, M.R.E., English 
Richard Spencer, M.M., Music 
Elmer A. Thompson, S.T.B., Dean, Reli- 
gious Education, Sociology 
R. A. Warlick, Jr., M.A., History 
Samuel Webb, B.A., Physical Education, 

Director, Athletics 
James T. Wilson, Jr., B.A., Superintendent, 

Buildings and Grounds 
Freeda Wood, Assistant Registrar 
Faye Wood, B.A., English, Public Relations 
J. M. Green, M.D., College Physician 
Gladys Taylor, Foods Manager 



"Deaconess. 



fiHome Missionary. 



IU.S.-2. 



§In cooperation with other boards. 



59 



SOCIAL WELFARE AND MEDICAL WORK— National 



Alaska — 

Jesse Lee Home, Seward, Alaska (Children's 
Home) 

Founded : 1890 at Unalaska 

1925 moved to Seward 
Residents: 101 
Donn M. Lee, Director 
Mrs. Donn M. Lee, Secretary 
*Rachel Yokel, Supervisor 
Mona Adamson, Housemother 
Mary Cookingham, Housemother 
fAudrey C. Frank, Housemother 
Velma Lea Hair, Housemother 
*Ary M. Shough, Housemother 

Lavinia Wallacb Young Community Centeh, 
P. O. Box 98, Nome, Alaska 
Founded: 1913 
Esther McCoy, Director 

Maynabd-MacDoucall Memorial Hospital, P. O. 
Box 497, Nome, Alaska 
Founded: 1913 
Rebuilt: 1949 

Capacity: 24 beds, 6 bassinets 
Fred M. Langsam, M.D., Medical Director 
Hazel Hanson, R.N., Director 
The Rev. Willard Mecklenburg, Chaplain 

Seward General Hospital, Seward, Alaska 
Founded: 1930 

Capacity: 32 beds, 8 bassinets 
*Ruth Murrell, R.N., Superintendent 
Joseph B. Deisher, M.D., Medical Director 
B. Alcorn, R.N., General Duty 
Hannah Chesnutt, R.N., General Duty 
*Bessie Estep, General Duty 
E. Griffith, R.N., General Duty 
Bertha McGhee, Bookkeeper 

Seward Sanatorium, Bartlett, Alaska 
Founded: 1946 
Capacity: 150 beds 
Paul W. Nelson, B.S., M.H.A., Administrator 
The Rev. Charles M. Malin, B.D., Chaplain 
Ada Stuart, R.N., Director of Nurses 
*Ruth Murrell, R.N., Treasurer 
*Sarah May Garrett 
tRuth Knight, R.N., General Duty 
tJimmie M. Knowles, B.A., Supply Services 

California — 

David and Margaret Home fob Children, Inc., 
1350 Third St., LaVerne, Calif. 
Founded: 1910 
Residents : 71 
Mrs. Cleta K. Terrill, Director 
11 Ed Odom, Assistant Director 
Mrs. Ann Hendy, Case Worker 
Mrs. Pearl Clifton, Nurse 
*Margaret L. Miller, Houseparent 

Frances DePauw Home, 4952 Sunset Blvd., 
Hollywood 27, Calif. (Children's Home) 
Founded: 1899 
Residents : 60 
*Reva I. McNabb, Director 
*Nellie Gleiser, Secretary 
Sarah Casey, Dietitian 

Mrs. Amanda R. Jones, Assistant Dietitian 
Mrs. Elva Andrews, Housemother 
Mrs. Blanche Crane, Housemother 
*Edith Curl, Housemother 
Mrs. Isabelle DeLeon, Housemother 
Maybelle Kise, Housemother 
*Jean Morgan, Housemother 



Friendship Home, 812 E. 28th St., Los Angeles 
11, Calif. (Residence Hall) 
Founded: 1946 
Residents : 22 
Mrs. Corah E. Jordan, Director 

Gum Moon Residence Hall, 940 Washington St., 
San Francisco 8, Calif. 
Founded: 1870 
Residents : 44 
*Fae Straley, Director 
Ruth Doi, Assistant Director 

Mary Elizabeth Inn, 1040 Bush St., San Fran- 
cisco 9, Calif. (Residence Hall) 
Founded: 1914 
Residents : 100 
*H. Louise Perry, Director 
Mrs. Ida Ragland 
Mrs. Lois Murphy 
Mrs. Wanona Berscherer 

Robincroft Rest Home, 275 Robincroft Dr., 
Pasadena 6, Calif. 
Founded: 1924 
Residents : 70 
*Mabel M. Metzger, Director 
Florence Evans, Head Nurse 
*Anna Banman 
*Dolores R. Diaz 
*Ora Marie Hoge 
JEleanor B. Stallard 
*Grace Vause 

Social Worker With Chinese, Filipinos, and 
Koreans 
JRuth A. Gress, 1760-G Filbert St., San Fran- 
cisco 23, Cal. 

Thoburn Terrace, 115 N. Almansor St., Alham- 
bra 12, Calif. 

Founded: 1923 

Residents : 34 

*Mildred Hewes, Director 

♦Lulu Boles, Bookkeeper and Secretary 

Beatrice Leland, Nurse 

*Wortley Moorman, Nurse 

Colorado- 
Social Worker, Defense Area, Colorado Springs, 
Colorado 

District of Columbia — 

Sibley Memorial Hospital and Lucy Webb Hayes 
School of Nursing, 1150 N. Capitol St., 
Washington 2, D. C. 
Founded: 1894 

Capacity: 265 beds, 95 bassinets, 
90 students 
John M. Orem, M.D., President 
Elsie Cook Cassassa, R.N., M.A., Director of 

Nurses 
Velma McCain, Comptroller 
Mrs. Johnnie F. Weber, Assistant to President 

Florida — 

Brewster Hospital, 1640 Jefferson St., Jackson- 
ville 4, Fla. 

Founded: 1901 

Capacity : 148 beds : 35 bassinets 
Jack H. Whittington, B.A., B.D., Adminis- 
trator 
*Annie Parker, B.A., M.A., Social -Religious 
Director 
Anita Irving, R.N., A. A., Director of Nurses 
Myrtis Brown, R.N., B.S., Assistant Director 

of Nurses 
Ruth Landrum, B.A., Dietitian 



*Deaconess. 



tU.S.-2. 



±Foreign Missionary. 



II Home Missionary 



60 



Mrs. Winona Alexander, B.A., Admitting 

Officer 
Thomas Lipscomb, M.D., Radiologist 
Garcia del Rio, A.X.R.T., Technician 
Margaret Moody, Comptroller 
Myrtle E. Smith, Accountant 
Pearl Haff, Credit Manager 
Laura Adams, R.N., Supervisor 
Albertha Bevel, R.N., Supervisor 
Matilda Brown, R.N., Anesthetist 
Elsie Gaines, R.N., Supervisor 
Mattye Montgomery, R.N., Supervisor 
Ida Payne, R.N., Supervisor 

Georgia — 

The Ethel Hakpst Home, 740 Fletcher St., 
Cedartown, Ga. (Children's Home) 
Founded: 1924 
Residents : 125 
Rev. Keith L. Loveless, Director 
Mrs. Keith L. Loveless, Supply Matron 
tJean Bowman, Dietitian 
Mrs. Mary M. Garrett, Secretary 
Mrs. Clara Budd, Housemother 
Pearl Clonts, Housemother 
Imogene Crumpton, Housemother 
tLucille F. Fillmore, Relief Housemother 
Mrs. Emma McWhorter, Housemother 
Mrs. Mavis Myers, Housemother 
*Edna Sexton, Housemother 
Mr. Hoke S. Stitt, Farmer 
Mr. and Mrs. N. O. Tate, Dairyman and 

Houseparents 
tMarilyn C. Thompson, Housemother 
Elsie J. Weaver, Nurse 

McCarty Community House, 750 Fletcher St., 
Cedartown, Ga. 
Founded: 1913 

Moved to above address: 1956 
*Helen Carter, Director 
tGeraldine Guptill 

Hawaii — 

Wesley Child Center, 1117 Kaili St., Honolulu 
17, Hawaii (Residential Treatment) 

Founded: 1903 

Residents : 16 
Rev. Eugene L. McClure, Director 
Myron B. Thompson, Case Worker 
Florence Fujita, Counselor 
Emma Freedman, Housemother 
Inez Townsley, Secretary 
Louise B. Wood, Dietitian 

Rubal Work, Box 675, Kaneohe, Oahu, Hawaii 
*Martha Almon 

Illinois — 

Peek Home, Polo, 111. (Children's Home) 
Founded: 1916 
Residents: 30 
Elwin P. Matthews, Director 
Mrs. Elwin P. Matthews, Assistant Director 
Louise Agazzi, Housemother 
Eileen Bakehouse, Housemother 
*Iva McCarter, Dietitian 
Mrs. Hazel Mitchum, Housemother 
Mr. Pat Mitchum 

Iowa — 

Iowa National Esther Hall, 921 Pleasant St., 
Des Moines 14, Iowa (Residence Hall) 
Founded: 1931 
Residents : 79 
Mrs. Margaret C. Hopkinson, Director 



Louisiana — 

Business Girls' Inn. 814 Cotton St., Shreveport, 
La. (Residence Hall) 
Founded: 1928 
Residents : 52 

Hazel Cooper, Director 

Massachusetts — 

Medical Mission Dispensary, 36 Hull St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Founded: 1894 

Serves approximately 18,000 annually 

Allan J. Blackhall, Superintendent 
Livia Cenerizio, Secretary 
Beryl Sims, Nurse 
Elizabeth Richardson, Nurse 
Elizabeth Smith, Nurse 

Missouri — 

Epworth School for Girls, 110 N. Elm Ave., 
Webster Groves 19, Mo. (Children's Home) 
Founded: 1909 
Residents : 60 

Elva Lee Perry, Director 

Mrs. Florence Lissant, Superintendent 

Mrs. Sarah Nisbet, Secretary 

Mrs. Elizabeth Hayman, Bookkeeper 

Ruby Richmond, Teacher 

Mrs. Agnes Swedberg, Teacher 

Mrs. Cora Book, Housemother 

Mrs. Maude Latimer, Housemother 

Mrs. Fern Ogles, Housemother 

Mrs. Martha Tarleton, Housemother 

Spofford Home For Children, 5501 Cleveland Ave., 
Kansas City 5, Mo. (Residential Treatment) 
Founded: 1916 
Residents : 18 

Mrs. Hester M. Sheneman, Director 
Kate B. Hammond, Assistant Director 
Frances Singer, Social Worker 
Isabell Bolan, Housemother 
Lillian Hankins, Housemother 
Marye C. Hines, Bookkeeper 
Sophia B. Landers, Housemother 
Ceola Matzeder, Housemother 
Dorothy Rhone, Housemother 

Nebraska — 

Mothers' Jewels Home, 19th and Division Sts., 
York, Neb. (Children's Home) 
Founded: 1890 
Residents : 80 

Rev. J. N. Smith, Director 

Mrs. J. N. Smith, Assistant Director 
•Frieda Wirz, R.N., Nurse 
tCalvin Beckendorf, Houseparent 

Clarence Douglas, Houseparent 

Calvin Hartbeck, Houseparent 

John Howe, Houseparent 

Mrs. John Howe, Secretary 

Sue Jewel, Houseparent 

New Jersey — 

Bancroft-Taylor Rest Home, 74 Cookman Ave., 
Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Founded: 1896 
Residents. 46 

Blanche Kemp, Director 
*Mable Wiggins, Assistant Director 

Kwang Chu, Nurse 
*Lena Larcom, Nurse 
*Ethel Vanek 



"Deaconess. 



fU.S.-2. 



Workers and Projects in Social Welfare and Medical Work 61 



New Mexico— 

Bataan Memorial Methodist Hospital, 5400 Gib- 
son Blvd., S. E., Albuquerque, N. M. 
Founded: 1912 
New Building: 1952 
Capacity: 116 beds, 30 bassinets 
James M. Taylor, B.A., M.S., Administrator 
Roscoe D. Manning, Comptroller 

New York — 

Alma Mathews House, 273-275 W. 11th St., New 
York 14, N. Y. (Residence Hall) 
Founded: 1889 
Residents: 22 
Hazel J. Lovell, Director 

Chautauqua Missionary Home, 34 Lake Dr., 
Chautauqua, N. Y. (Summer Home) 
Founded: 1923 
Capacity : 20 
Mrs. Charles H. Thomas, Hostess 

Fenton Memorial Rest Home, Box 748, Chau- 
tauqua, N. Y. (Summer Home) 
Founded: 1917 
•Dixie F. Carl, Hostess 
Japanese Work, 323 W. 108th St., New York 25, 
N. Y. 

North Carolina — 

Home for Retired Workers, 29 Spears Ave., 
Asheville, N. C. 

Property Purchased : 1956 

Ohio— 

Esther Hall, 221 W. 9th St., Cincinnati 2, Ohio 
(Residence Hall) 
Founded: 1891 
Residents: 31 
*Alice E. Murdock, Director 
•Grace Badgett 

Flower Esther Hall, 1324 Superior St., Toledo 
11, Ohio (Residence Hall) 
Founded: 1908 
Residents : 34 
Mrs. Alice M. Silver, Director 

Friendly Center Community House, 1334 Su- 
perior St., Toledo 11, Ohio 
Founded: 1920 
Warner C. Silver, Director 

Friendship Home, 549 W. 7th St., Cincinnati 3, 
Ohio (Residence Hall) 
Founded: 1917 
Residents: 19 
Mrs. Thelma Warley, Director 

Holloway Deaconess Home, 303 Howard St., 
Bridgeport, Ohio 
Founded: 1900 
•Homie R. Clark, Director 
Tommie L. Caskey, Community Worker 
"Emma Vanek, Community Worker 

McKelvey Hall, 72 S. Washington Ave., Colum- 
bus 15, Ohio (Residence Hall) 
Founded: 1900 
Residents: 20 
Mrs. Bonnie B. Basden, Director 

Mothers' Memorial Center, 547 W. 7th St., 
Cincinnati 3, Ohio 
Founded: 1923 
Enrollment: 90 
flLucile Holliday, Director 
Mrs. ElFie V. McPheeters, Assistant Director 



Louise Butler, Nursery Worker 
Sara B. Smith, Nursery Worker 

Social Worker, Box 755, Windham, Ohio 
Founded: 1954 
•Doris Rhodes 

South Carolina — 

Killingbworth Homb, 1831 Pendleton St., Co- 
lumbia, S. C. (Residence Hall) 
Founded: 1947 
Residents: 30 
•Mary E. Nichols, Director 

Texas — 

Freeman Clinic and Newark Conference Hos- 
pital, 1109 E. 5th St., El Paso, Tex. 
Founded: 1921 

Capacity: 22 beds, 16 bassinets 
*Millie Rickford, R.N., Superintendent 
Refugio Castillo, Admitting Officer 
tLaura Ann Turner, Nurse 
Lois Jones, R.N., General Duty 
•Ruth Kern, R.N., B.S., Clinic Supervisor 
Dorothea Munoz, Nurse 
Mrs. Ramona Talvavera, L.V.N. , General 

Duty 
•Blanche Thornton, R.N., Supervisor 
Mrs. Anita Villazana, R.N., General Duty 
Alice Wiilitts, R.N., General Duty 

Rose Gregory Houchen Settlement, 1119 E. 5th 
St., El Paso, Tex. 
Founded: 1893 
Present building: 1912 
Serves approximately 15,000 
•Dorothy Little, Superintendent 
Clarice Elliott, Group Worker 
•Beatrice M. Fernandez, Day Nursery Super- 
visor 
•Patricia Gibson, Nursery School Teacher 
Alfonzo Ortega, Boys' Group Worker 
Jane Maxwell, Group Worker 

Young Women's Cooperative Home, 1808 Wheeler 
St., Houston, Tex. (Residence Hall) 
Founded: 1907 
Residents : 29 
Mrs. Ella Long, Director 
Mrs. Grace Martin 
Eloise Owen 
Mrs. Mattie C Rayborn, Dietitian 

Utah— 

Esther Hall, 475 25th St., Ogden, Utah (Resi- 
dence Hall) 

Founded: 1913 

Residents : 20 

Marie E. Haass, Director 

Esther Hall, 347 So. 4th East, Salt Lake City 2, 
Utah (Residence Hall) 
Founded: 1936 
Residents: 13 
•Nellie Jones, Director 

Virginia — 

Susannah Wesley Hall, 223 29th St., Newport 
News, Va. (Residence Hall) 
Founded: 1943 
Residents: 26 
•Pearl L. Eble, Director 

Wilson Inn, 2205 Monument Ave., Richmond, 
Va. (Residence Hall) 
Founded: 1911 
Residents : 56 
Cecile II. Davis, Director 



"Deaconess. 



H Home Missionary. 



62 



SOCIAL WELFARE AND MEDICAL WORK— Conference 



Alabama — Indiana — 

Eva Comer Cooperative Home, 1730 8th Ave. No., Esther Hall Deaconess Home, 1241 N. New 

Birmingham 3, Ala. (Residence Hall) Jersey St., Indianapolis 2, Ind. (Residence 

(North Alabama Conference) Hall) (Indiana Conference) 

Founded : 1920 Founded : 1942 (Esther Hall) 

Residents: 50 Residents: 20 

Mrs. Floy S. Jones, Director Mrs. Esther S. Adams, Director 
Mrs. V. G. Oliver 
Alma Redd 

Iowa — 

Arkansas — Shesler Hall, 1308 Nebraska St., Sioux City 18, 

Social Worm, Booneville Sanatorium, Boone- Iowa (Residence Hall) 

ville, Ark. (North Arkansas Conference) (North Iowa Conference) 

(Cooperative Work) Founded : 1901 

Residents: 30 
California — 

Beulah Rest Home, 4690 Tompkins Ave., Oak- Kansas 

(California-Nevada Conference) Esther Hall, 1002 S. Broadway, Wichita 11, 

„ Kan. (Residence Hall) 

Founded: 1909 (Central Kansas Conference) 

Residents: 90 _ . . 1nao 

.. _ , . _,. Founded: 1923 

Mrs. Grace Anderson, Director Residents - 23 

Social Worker, Los Angeles County General *Pearle McKeeman, Director 
Hospital, 1200 North State St., Los Angeles 

33, Calif, c/o Chaplain's Office M . , 

(Southern California-Arizona Conference) Maryland 

•Doris A. Price Baltimore Deaconess Work 

(Baltimore Conference) 

Methodist Hospital of Southern California, „ _, , - „ AT 

P. O. Box 418, Arcadia, Calif. Business Girls' Lodge w The Methodist 

(Southern California-Arizona Conference) Sf^S' ST*"' 2J m ' Baltlmore ' 

v Md. (Residence Hall) 

Founded in Los Angeles 1903 (Baltimore Conference) 

Rebuilt in Arcadia 1956 ,„ , , ir „ ,,. T , , , T .. 

ttt , A ™ tt m- t . . • • * (Formerly Wo-Ho-Mis Lodge and Meth- 

Walter R. Hoefflin, Jr., Administrator p ro Lodge) 



•Beulah A. Douglass 



Residents : 



District of Columbia— Mrs. Emma S. Phillips, Director 

Myrtle Harrison, Assistant Director 
Swartzell Methodist Home for Children, 6200 
Second St., N. W., Washington 11, D. C. 

(Baltimore Conference) Michigan — 

Founded: 1912 Esther Hall, 523 Lyons St., N. E., Grand 

Residents: 45 Rapids 3, Mich. (Residence Hall) 

Pauline Kinsinger, Director (Michigan Conference) 

Mrs. Genevieve B. Stone, Case Worker Founded: 1921 

tCatherine Rea Residents: 34 

Washington Deaconess Home, 4825 16th St., Mrs - Vilena Mishler, Director 

(BaSno^cSf™ 1 ) °' & ^™™ Home, 6100 Scotten Ave., Detroit 10. 

Founded: 1889 (Detroit Conference) 

Residents: 8 Work Terminated: 1956 
*L. Mae Fullmer, Director 

Olnet Rest Houi, Ludington, Mich. 

Illinois (Michigan Conference) (Summer Home) 

Cunningham Children's Home, 905 N. Cunning- oun e ' 
ham Ave., Urbana, 111. 

(Illinois Conference) Minnesota — 

Founded: 1895 Methodist Girls' Club, 181 W. College Ave., St. 

Residents: 70 Paul 2, Minn. (Residence Hall) 

Mrs. Merle N. English, Director (Minnesota Conference) 

•Beatrice McKee Founded: 1917 

Edith Shufelt Residents: 26 

Holdin Memorial Hospital, Carbondale, 111. . Director 

(Southern Illinois Conference) 

Work Terminated : 1956 New York 

Esther Hall, 537 Melrose St., Chicago 13, 111. Children's Home of Wyoming Conference, 1182 

(Residence Hall) Chenango St., Binghamton, N. Y. 

(Rock River Conference) (Wyoming Conference) 

Founded: 1916 Founded: 1913 

Residents: 27 Residents: 64 

Mrs. Herbert Chenoweth, Director Harold Strong, Director 

•Deaconess. tU.S.-2. 



Workers and Projects in Town and Country 



63 



Friendship Home, 300 Jefferson St., Buffalo 4, 
N. Y. (Residence Hall) 
(Genesee Conference) 
Founded: 1924 
Residents: 20 
Mrs. K. Wallis, Director 
Oregon— 

Methodist Home, 1625 Center St., Salem, Ore. 
(Oregon Conference) 
Founded: 1909 
Residents : 70 
Mrs. Ethel Cole, Business Manager 
Pennsylvania — 

Elizabeth A. Bradley Children's Home, 214 
Hulton Rd., Oakmont, Pa. 
(Pittsburgh Conference) 
Founded: 1903 
Residents : 28 
Mrs. April Schell, Director 

Esther Hall, 6055 Drexel Rd., Philadelphia 31, 
Pa. (Residence Hall) 
(Philadelphia Conference) 
Founded: 1926 
Residents : 15 
Mrs. Margaret W. Gray, Director 



Friendship Housb, 3902 Spruce St., Philadelphia, 
Pa. (Residence Hall) 
(Delaware Conference) 
Founded: 1923 
Residents : 
, Director 

Morals Coubt, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

(Pittsburgh Conference) (Cooperative Work) 
Mrs. A. C. Rinehart, 2608 Pennsylvania Ave., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Dbaconess Home and Girls' Club, 
2000 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. (Resi- 
dence Hall) (Pittsburgh Conference) 

Founded: 1890 

Residents : 29 

Mrs. Emil Dauenhauer, Director 

Ruth M. Smith Children's Home, 407 S. Main 
St., Sheffield, Pa. (Erie Conference) 
Founded: 1921 
Residents : 28 

Mrs. Robert M. Coulter, Director 

Travelers' Aid, 618 Pennsylvania Station, Pitts- 
burgh 22, Pa. (Pittsburgh Conference) 
(Cooperative Work) 



TOWN AND COUNTRY WORK— National 



Alabama — 

Mobile County Rural Center, Rt. 1, Mt. Ver- 
non, Ala. 
Mrs. Marjorie H. Hughes, Head Resident 
Mrs. Kenneth D. Sells, Teacher 

North Alabama Rural Work 
Vernon- Detroit Area 

*Violet Guinn, Sulligent, Alabama 
Fayette Area 
tWinona Campbell, P. O. Box 452, Fayette, 
Ala. 
South Alabama Rural Work 
Crenshaw -Coffee Counties 



Arizona — 

Elot Community Center, Box 902, Eloy, Ariz. 
*011ie Willings, Head Resident 
Mildred Ralston, Program Director 

Yuma Methodist Mission, Box 844, Yuma, Ariz. 
Rev. Eugene C. Johnston, Head Resident 
Mrs. Beverly Rieckhoff Johnston, Program 
Director 
tWilliam Hust, Boys' Worker 

Arkansas — 

Arkansas-Oklahoma Cooperative Rural Work 
Clark County 



Nashville Area 



Sevier County 

North Arkansas Rural Work 
Imboden County 

Iris Bell, Box 204, Imboden, Ark. 
Izard County Parish 
•Mary Chaffin, Box 327, Melbourne, Ark. 

California — 

Neighborhood House, 506 Fourth Street, Calex- 
ico, Calif. 
*Lulu B. Bryan, Head Resident 



*Louise Murray, Program Director 
Mrs. Ofelia Cazares, Director Children's Work 
Betty Joan Shaffer, Girls' Club Worker 
Calvin Davis, Boys' Club Worker 

Florida— 

Florida Rural Work 
Gainesville Area 

Rebecca Moddelmog, Box 155, Lake Butler, 
Fla. 
Madison County 
♦Carol Gibby, 306 W. Hayne St., Madison, 
Fla. 

tShirlee Willis, 400 West Green St., Perry, 
Fla. 

Georgia — 

Georgia Cooperative Rural Work 
Coordinator 
*Addie Mae Jamieson, 483 College St., Ma- 
con, Ga. 

North Georgia Rural Work 
Barnesville Area 
tBetty Jo Hill, Forsyth, Georgia 

Carroll County 
*Ella Virginia Courtney, 1347 Cave Spring 
Rd., Rome, Ga. 
Towns -Union County Area 

Ann Pearre, Box 25, Young Harris, Ga. 

South Georgia Rural Work 
Bridgeboro-Funston Area 

tAcka Lewis, Funston, Ga. 
Buena Vista Area 

tPatricia Bennett, Buena Vista, Ga. 
Cairo Area 
fWilla Dean Lindsay, 810 S. Broad St., 
Cairo, Ga. 
Irwin ton Area 

Jean Stocks, c/o Mrs. R. L. Hartley, 
Irwinton, Georgia 
Rochelle Area 

Mrs. Ruth Beasley Mincey, Rochelle, Ga. 



•Deaconess; fU. S.-2 



64 



Kentucky — 

Muhlenberg Methodist Settlement, Rt. 4, Cen- 
tral City, Ky. 
•Myrta Davis, Head Resident 
•Grace Arnold, Group Worker 
Sue Bennett Rural Project, Sue Bennett College, 
London, Ky. 
*Jennie Flood 
West Kentucky Rural Work 
Madisonville Area 
•Grace Thatcher, 247 W. Broadway, Madi- 
sonville, Ky. 

Louisiana — 

Dulac Indian Center, Box 1150, Dulac, La. 
Herbert C. Brunson, Head Resident 
Mrs. Herbert C. Brunson, Program Director 

and Kindergarten Teacher 
Wilhelmina Hooper, Director of Adult Edu- 
cation 
Louisiana Bayou Work 
tLois Schwarze, R.N., Box 1150, Dulac, La. 
Louisiana Rural Work 
Louisiana Cooperative Work 



St. Tammany Parish 

*Shiela Nuttall, Box 8, Lacombe, La. 
MacDonell Methodist Center, P. O. Box 270, 
Houma, La. 
Anne Coucoules, Director 
Mrs. Bessie Warren, Houseparent 
Mabry O'Neal Layton, Houseparent 
Mrs. Mabry O'Neal Layton, Houseparent 
Mrs. Velma Hebert, Bookkeeper 

Maine — 

Maine Rural Work 

Washington County Group Ministry 
*Rosemary Nixon, Box 352, Millbridge, Me. 

Mississippi — 

Mississippi Rural Center, Box 229, Columbia, 
Miss. 
Isaac Pittman, Director 
Mrs. Isaac Pittman, Program Director 
•Margaret Bess, Librarian and Group Worker 
North Mississippi Rural Work 
Ittawamba County 

•Loraine Heath, Box 275, Fulton, Miss. 
Tishomingo County 
*Cora Lee Glenn, Iuka, Miss. 
South Mississippi Rural Work 
Hinds County 

•Waunita Trickett, Raleigh, Miss. 
Wayne County 

Mrs. Augusta Helms, Waynesboro, Miss. 

Missouri — 

National College Rural Work, 5123 Truman Rd., 
Kansas City 27, Mo. 
•Vera Falls, Field Work Supervisor 
Southeast Missouri Rural Work 
Montgomery County Group Ministry 

Southwest Missouri Rural Work 
Barry County 

•Katheryn Kuhler, 402 West St., Cassville, 
Mo. 
Johnson County 



New Hampshire — 

New Hampshire Rural Work 
Parish of the Headwaters 

Emaline Cornett, Box 362, Colebrook, N. H. 

North Carolina — 

Eastern North Carolina Rural Work 
Pembroke Area 

•Alta Nye, Pembroke, N. C. 
Roberdel Area 
•Ethelynde Ballance, Rt. 3, Rockingham, 
N. C. 

Western North Carolina Rural Work 
Macon County 

tMargaret Wilson, Box 502, Franklin, N. C. 
Surry County 

tJean Beaty, 309 Granite St., Mt. Airy, N. C. 
Watauga Charge 

•Geraldine Surratt, Rt. 1, Banner Elk, N. C. 

Cherokee Indian Mission 

•Eleanore Hickok, Box 174, Cherokee, N. C. 

Ohio— 

Dilles Community Center, Dilles Bottom, 
Rt. 2, Jacobsburg, Ohio 
•Doris DeGraff, Director 

Oklahoma — 

Cookson Hills Center, Cookson, Okla. 
•Dorothy Clark, Group Worker and Librarian 
Mrs. Gertrude Pinder, R.N. 

Indian Mission Cooperative Work 

Mrs. Waldo Wettengel, Coordinator, Rush 
Springs, Okla. 
•Evelyn Green, Director of Youth Work, P. O. 

Box 4029, Oklahoma City 9, Okla. 
Mrs. Ebenezer Wesley, Director Leadership 
Training, P. O. Box 4097, Oklahoma City, 
Okla. 

Ponca Methodist Mission, Box 456, Ponca City, 
Okla. 
Rev. Robert Pinezaddleby, Director 

Penn sylvania — 

Hollywood Community Houses, Rt. 1, Box 56, 
Hazleton, Pa. 
Mrs. Edith Roher Schmeer, Director 

McCrum Community House (Oliver Chapel), 26 
Nutt Ave., Uniontown, Pa. 
•Alice Farrington 1 Co . Directors 
*Bozena Sochor I 

Metcalfe Community House, Rt. 1, Dunbar, Pa. 
•Lillian Ellis, Head Resident 

Tennessee — 

Dale Hollow Larger Parish, Alpine, Tenn. 



Webster County 
•Leone Lemons, 503 S. Marshall, Marshfield, 
Mo. 



Middle Tennessee Rural Work 

Waynesboro Area 
•Anne McKenzie, Waynesboro, Tenn. 

Scarritt College Rural Work, Nashville 5, Tenn. 
Alice Cobb, Field Work Supervisor 

West Tennessee Rural Work 
Dyersburg District Group Ministry 
*Ruby Hudgins, Finley, Tenn. 
tGail Whitaker, Finley, Tenn. 



•Deaconess. 



UJ.S.-2. 



11 Home Missionary 



Workers and Projects in Town and Country 



65 



Tennessee-Virginia — 

Holston Valley Rural Work 
Coordinator 
•Catherine Ezell, Box 1178, Johnson City, 
Tenn. 
Cleveland-Big Springs 
tVerna Mae Parker, 983 Inman St., N. E., 
Cleveland, Tenn. 
French Broad Area 
tBetty Cox, 4921 Asheville Highway, Knox- 
ville, Tenn. 
Hawkins County 

Gladys Newcomb, Surgoinsville, Tenn. 
Iron Mountain Larger Parish 

Yvonne Linkous, Grant, Va. 
Monroe Area 

Lou Ella Sherlin, Hiwassee College, Madi- 
sonville, Tenn. 
Newport Area 

Ruth E. Craven, Del Rio, Tenn. 
Nolichuckey Area 
tEloise Bough, c/o Rev. Wallace Chappell, 
Rt. 4, Chuckey, Tenn. 
Ocoee Area 

Dorothy Caudle, Ocoee, Tenn. 
Rocky Gap Area 

Geraldine Hunt, Bastian, Va. 
Rose Hill Larger Parish 

tVirginia Miller, Rose Hill, Va. 
Sequatchie Valley 

•Martha Stewart, Box 435, Jasper, Tenn. 
Wytheville Area 

Mrs. Annie M. Jones, 410 W. Madison St., 
Wytheville, Va. 
Garden Creek Community Center, Box 126, Oak- 
wood, Va. 
Emma Mann, Head Resident 
Zella Glidden, Kindergarten Teacher and 
Rural Worker 

Texas — 

Alpine Community Center, Box 176, Alpine, Tex. 

Mrs. Mabel N. Hamilton, Head Resident 
Central Texas Rural Work 
Hood County 

Mrs. Nan H. Wright, Box 447, Granbury, 
Tex. 

North Texas Rural Work 
Red River County 

Virginia Benefield, 506 North Walnut St., 
Clarksville, Tex. 
Ozona Community House, Box 41, Ozona, Tex. 
•Ethel R. Wolf ) ~ r,, m „ + „ M 
Dorothy Price \ Co-Directors 

Southside Community Center, 518 S. Guadalupe 
St., San Marcos, Tex. 
•Mary Riddle, Head Resident 
Southwest Texas Rural Work 
Caldwell County 
•Margaret Hight, Box 94, Leesville, Tex. 



Valley Institute, Box 56, Pharr, Tex. 
•Martha Home, Head Resident 

, Director, Adult Work 

tAlice Himes, Director, Children's Work 
tMarjorie Steel, Director, Youth Work 

Wesley Community House, 414 N. Buena Vista, 
Robstown, Tex. 

•Mabel J. Whited, Head Resident 
Isidra Verver, Group Worker and Kinder- 
garten Teacher 

Utah— 

Highland Boy Community House, Rt. 1, Box 
30-B, Bingham Canyon, Utah 
•Ada Duhigg, Head Resident 
•Mildred May, Kindergarten Teacher 
•Margaret Stimson, Group Worker 

Vermont — 

North Barre Community Center, 101 Smith St., 
Barre, Vt. 

Marion Harper \ p n .r); rPP tnrs 

•H. Josephine Berglund 1 <-o-Uirectors 
Mrs. Dorothy Tomasini, Secretary 

Virginia — 

Virginia Rural Work 
Cambria-Christiansburg Area 
•Dorothy Wilber, 105 Roanoke St., Chris- 
tiansburg, Va. 

Franklin County 

Charlotte Seegars, c/o Ferrum Junior Col- 
lege, Ferrum, Va. 
Lexington Larger Parish 
tAmanda Sarah Pleasant, 114 Taylor St., 
Lexington, Va. 

West Virginia — 

Scott's Run Settlement, Box 147, Osage, W. Va. 

•Margaret Marshall ) Cn-Dirpptors 
John Marshall J <-°--L»rectors 

Wesley House, Amherstdale, W. Va. 
•Verdie Anderson, Head Resident 
Alice Hite, Group Worker 

West Virginia Coal Fields, Bluefield District 
Roderfield Area 
•Frieda Morris, Community Worker, Ash- 
land, West Virginia 

Wisconsin— 

Odanah Indian Work 

•Lois Marquart, Box 255, Ashland, Wis. 
West Wisconsin Rural Work 
Phillips Subdistrict Area 

•Gene Maxwell, Phillips, Wis. 



TOWN AND COUNTRY WORK— Conference 



Illinois— 

Langleyville Settlement, Langleyville, 111. 
fiZoe L. King, Director 

Kansas— 

Eastern Kansas Rural Work 



•Deaconess 
3 



tU.S.-2. 



Michigan — 

Detroit Conference Frontier Work 
Mrs. J. B. Silas, Oscoda, Mich. 

Montana — 

Methodist Blackfeet Mission (Cooperative 



Work) 
Jean Scruggs, Browning, Mont. 



11 Home Missionary 



66 



New York and Pennsylvania — 
Erie Rural Work 
Good Neighbor Larger Parish 



Genesee Conference Rural Work 
Canisteo Valley Cooperative Parish 
tMarcella Gustafson, 1 Park PI., Addison, 
N. Y. 

Pennsylvania — 

Central Pennsylvania Rural Work 
Hughesville Larger Parish 



South Carolina — 

South Carolina Rural Work 
Spartanburg -Greenville Area 
•Mary Beth Littlejohn, Pacolet, S. C 



West Virginia — 

Fairmont Subdistrict Mission Work 

*Sophia Fetzer, 226 Walnut Ave., Fairmont, 
W. Va. 

Minnie Nat Settlement House, 43 Marshall St., 
Benwood, W. Va. 
*Frances Bearnes, Head Resident 
•Beulah Morton, Group Worker 

Sabbatical Leave 

*Marjorie Hanton *Sarah Kee 

On Leave for Study 

Barbara Boggs 

Retired 

*Dorothy Dodd *Bessie K. Van Scyoc 



URBAN WORK— National 



Alabama — 

Bethlehem House, 150 Eighth Ave., N., Bir- 
mingham 4, Ala. 
'Virginia Tyler, Executive Director 
Mrs. Sebelle L. Brown, Group Worker 
Mrs. Gwendolyn White, Group Worker 
Elmer Harris, Group Worker 
Thomas Brown, Group Worker 

Dumas Wesley House, 2732 Mill St., Mobile 17, 
Ala. 
•Esther G. Palmer, Director 
Luciel DeLoach, Children's Worker 
H. E. McCrary, Group Worker 

Ensley Community House, 1400 Avenue H, Ens- 
ley 8, Ala. 
•Virginia Tyler, Executive Director 
*Mary Shacklett, Group Worker 
•Rubye Russell, Group Worker 
Mrs. Esther Boone, Kindergarten Teacher 
Mrs. Rosalyn Lewis, Assistant Kindergarten 

Teacher 
Buell Fountain, Jr., Physical Education 

Ensley-Elyton Branch, 465 W. First St., Bir- 
mingham 4, Ala. 
•Virginia Tyler, Director 
Mrs. Estelle Johnson, Program Director 
Bob Strong, Boys' Worker 
Don Wilson, Boys' Worker 

Nellie Buroe Community Center, 1226 Clay St., 
Montgomery 5, Ala. 
*Mary C. Cameron, Head Resident 

Arizona — 

Wesley Community House, 1300 South Tenth 
St., Phoenix, Ariz. 
*Ruth Ferguson, Executive Director 
•Marjorie Dumke, Program Director 

Arkansas — 

Aldersgate Camp, Rt. 6, Box 564, Little Rock, 
Ark. 
M. W. Willis, Director 

California — 

Homer Toberman Settlement House, 131 N. Grand 
Ave., San Pedro, Calif. 
Mrs. Louise M. Larsen, Executive Director 
Ruth Murphy, Group Worker 
tElsa Milby, Group Worker 
C. E. Angus, Group Worker 
John Hergesheimer, Group Worker 



Florida— 

Miami Latin Center, 1200 N. E. Miami Ct., 
Miami 32, Fla. 

•Lillian Kelly, Head Resident 
•May Coburn, Kindergarten Teacher 

Rosa Valdez Settlement, 1802 N. Albany, Box 
4183, Tampa 7, Fla. 
•Dorothea M. Reid, Head Resident 
•Ruth Mayhall, Group Worker 
tMrs. Mary Alice Janis, Kindergarten Teacher 

Wesley Community House, 1100 Varela St., Key 
West, Fla. 

•Beatrice Orrell, Director 
Loyda Rodriguez, Club Worker 

Wolff Settlement, 2801 Seventeenth St., Tampa 
5, Fla. 
•Cleo Barber, Head Resident 
Hazel G. Barke, Group Worker 
fClara Faye Keaton, Kindergarten Teacher 

Georgia — 

Bethlehem Community Center, 9 McDonough 
Blvd., S. E., Atlanta, Ga. 
Mrs. Eva B. Parks, Acting Director 
Mrs. Marcella Upton, Group Worker 
Mrs. J. H. Graham, Group Worker 
Mrs. Susie P. Brown, Kindergarten Teacher 

Bethlehem Community Center, 1336 Conklin 
Ave., Augusta, Ga. 
•Fannie Bame. Head Resident 
Mrs. A. W. Gardiner, Group Worker 
Mrs. Edna Damren, Group Worker 
Mrs. Rosalind Smith, Group Worker 
Mrs. Cecil Duren, Group Worker 
Mrs. Gertrude Mack, Group Worker 
Mrs. Felecia Abney, Kindergarten Teacher 

Bethlehem Center, 508 E. Gordon St., Savan- 
nah, Ga. 
Mrs. D. R. Bryant, Acting Director 
Mrs. Norma Talbert, Kindergarten Teacher 

Open Door Community House, 2405 Second Ave.. 
Columbus, Ga. 
•Florence R. Jury, Head Resident 
•Kathryn E. Esterline. Club Director 
S. Earl Ward, Boys' Worker 
Wesley Community House, 342 Richardson St., 
S. W., Atlanta 3, Ga. 
•Rosamond Johnson, Head Resident 



•Deaconess 



tU.S.-2. 



11 Home Missionary 



Workers and Projects in Urban Work 



67 



Iris Fraser, Group Worker 
Mary Lou Boggs, Group Worker 

Illinois — 

Lessib Bates Davis Neighborhood House, 1200 
N. 13th St., East St. Louis, 111. 
Mrs. Marriam C. Roberts, Acting Head 

Resident 
Julia Hays, Group Work Supervisor 
Deryl Kidwell, Day Care Supervisor 
fMarianna Hunsinger, Day Care Teacher 
tMrs. Stella L. Matherne, Day Care Teacher 
Mrs. Ruth Jenne, Day Care Teacher 

Marcy Center, 1539 S. Springfield Ave., Chicago 
23, 111. 

Hazzard F. Parks, Director 

Mrs. Susie Parks, Nursery School Supervisor 
*Mrs. Ramona H. Schutt, Group Worker 
*Berta Engel, Administrative Assistant 
fRobert Trost, Boys' Worker 
*Flora Clipper, Nursery School Teacher 
tRose Williams, Girls' Worker 

Newberry Avenue Center, 1335 S. Newberry 
Ave., Chicago 8, 111. 
Barrington Dunbar, Head Resident 
Olivia Napoleon, Nursery School Director 
Alice Reffells, Head Nursery Teacher 
Alyce C. Evans, Nursery Teacher 
Gloria Bradley, Nursery Teacher 
Oneda Cowan, Group Worker 

Indiana — 

Campbell Friendship House, 2100 Washington 
St., Gary, Ind. 

Emma Freeman, Head Resident 
Mrs. Doris Norton, Girls' Worker 
Bransford J. Norton, Boys' Work Director 
Winston Vaz, Jr., Physical Activities Director 
tMarion Woodward, Play School and Gills' 
Worker 

Neighborhood Community Center, 2004 John St., 
Fort Wayne 5, Ind. 
Mrs. Leona C. Wilkerson, Community Worker 

Kentucky — 

Wesley Community House, 801 E. Washington 
St., Louisville 6, Ky. 
"Helen Mandlebaum, Head Resident 
flBuford E. Farris, Jr., Group Worker 
Mildred Moffett, Group Worker 
Mary Jane Renner, Group Worker 
Ramona Kirby, Group Worker 
Marion Way, Group Worker 

Louisiana — 

People's Methodist Community Center, 2019 
Simon Bolivar Ave., New Orleans 13, La. 
Mrs. Pearl C. Turnbull, Nursery Teacher 

St. Mark's Community Center, 1130 N. Rampart 
St., New Orleans 16, La. 
*Fae L. Daves, Director 
Laura Smith, Group Leader 
Daisy Calhoun, Group Leader 
Mrs. Carolyn Lilly, Day Care Director 
Geniece Pedigo, Day Care Teacher 

Mississippi — 

Bethlehem Center, 920 Blair St., Jackson 2, 
Miss. 

*Moselle G. Eubanks, Director 
Theresa M. Hicks, Girls' Worker 
Mrs. Eddye V. Wiggins, Kindergarten Teacher 
Hughes Clayton, Boys' Worker 



Moore Community House, 932 Davis St., Biloxi, 
Miss. 
*Eunice E. Stockton, Head Resident 
*Emily Guigou, Group Worker 
Mrs. Barbara Talerice, Kindergarten Teacher 

Wesley Community House, 1520 Eighth Ave., 
Meridian, Miss. 
*Birdie Reynolds, Director 
*Mae I. Greer, Club Worker 

Missouri — 

Della C. Lamb Neighborhood House, 702 Admiral 
Blvd., Kansas City 6, Mo. 
*Betty Bowers, Director 
*Evelyn Breeden, Group Worker 
tLois Swartzendruber, Group Worker 
tBerniece Ryno, Group Worker 

Kingdom House, 1102 Morrison Ave., St. Louis 
4, Mo. 
Ralph J. Koeppe, Executive Director 
Mrs. J. O. Kirkland, Program Secretary 
Earl Hodgen, Program Worker 
Marion Zinser, Family Visitor 
Julia Zimmerman, Nursery Director 
Jo Anne Stocking, Nursery Teacher 
Mrs. Curtis R. Spencer, Nursery Teacher 
Mrs. Kenneth Courtney, Nursery Teacher 

Wesley Community House, 200 Cherokee St., 
St. Joseph 48, Mo. 
*Helen Byrd Reeves, Head Resident 
tLeona B. Fredericks, Girls' Worker 
Will L. Lane, Boys' Worker 
Mrs. Vella Fisher, Nursery Teacher 

New York — 

Neighborhood Center, 615 Mary St., Utica 3, 
N. Y. 
flRuth Wright, Executive Director 
Marie A. Russo, Group Work Director 
Doris Collins, Nursery School Director 
Mrs. Lloyd Smith, Nursery School Assistant 
lima Vrtachnik, Group Worker 

Work Among Puerto Ricans, New York, N. Y. 
Virginia Palmer (Grace Methodist Church, 
131 W. 104 St., New York 25, N. Y.) 

North Carolina — 

Bethlehem Centkr, 2705 Baltimore Ave., Charlotte 
3, N. C. 
*Margaret Hodkins, Head Resident 
Dorothy Mahoney, Girls' Worker 
Thomas J. Harshaw, Boys' Worker 
Mrs. Jennie M. Funderburk, Kindergarten 
Teacher 

Bethlehem Community Center, 408 Hickory St., 
Winston-Salem 4, N. C. 
Mrs. Marian B. Wooten, Head Resident 
Mrs. H. N. Jackson, Kindergarten Teacher 
Mrs. M. M. Sellers, Kindergarten Teacher 
Mrs. Videssa Davis, Nursery Teacher 
Alice M. Brown, Nursery Teacher 

Defense Work (Cherry Point Marine Base), 
Havelock, N. C. 
Charlotte Stevenson, Community Worker (Box 
193, Havelock, N. C.) 

Ohio— 

Pearl Street Methodist Community House, 334 
N. Pearl St., Youngstown 6, Ohio 
Robert Beaumier, Superintendent 



"Deaconess. 



fU.S.-2. 



flHome Missionary. 



68 



Rebecca Williams Community House, 760 Main 
Ave., S. W., Warren, Ohio 
Esther Tappan, Director 

South Side Settlement, 363 Reeb Ave., Colum- 
bus 7, Ohio 
*Martha Bucke, Acting Director 

Oklahoma — 

Bethlehem Center, 530 N. E. Sixth St., Okla- 
homa City 4, Okla. 
•Melva Humphrey, Head Resident 
Esther M. Brotherson, Program Director 

Wesley Community Center, 431 S. W. 11th St., 
Oklahoma City 4, Okla. 
•Dorothy M. Russell, Head Resident 
•Margaret D. McLaughlin, Group Worker 

Oregon — 

Linnton Community Center, 10614 N. W. St. 
Helen's Rd., Portland 9, Ore. 
•Ella Eisner, Director 

Sonth Carolina — 

Bethlehem Community Center, 2500 Elmwood 
Ave., Columbia 4, S. C. 
•Thelma Heath, Director 
Margaret E. Burwick, Group Worker 
Bethlehem Center, 397 Highland Ave., Spartan- 
burg, S. C 
•Annie Mclver Rogers, Head Worker 
V. Olivia Gist, Kindergarten Worker 
fMona McNutt, Group Worker 
James Thornton, Boys' Worker 
Defense Work (Parris Island Marine Base), 
Beaufort, S. C 
Mrs. Nancy S. Altman, Community Worker 
(Box 382, Beaufort, S. C.) 

Tennessee — 

Bethlehem Community House, 1401 College St., 
Chattanooga 3, Tenn. 
•Constance E. Perry, Director 
tSylvia S. Brookshire, Club Worker 
tNellie Kennedy, Club Worker 
Bethlehem Center, 749 Walker Ave., Memphis 
6, Tenn. 
•Mary Lou Bond, Head Resident 
•Louise Weeks, Program Director 
t Aline Sykes, Activity Leader 
Mrs. H. H. Jones, Kindergarten Teacher 
Mrs. Georgia Dancy, Kindergarten Teacher 
Bethlehem Center, 1417 Charlotte Ave., Nash- 
ville 3, Tenn. 
^Frederick D. Rogers, Executive Director 
•Pauline Goodwin, Program Director 
Thomas Mumphery, Group Worker 
•Rachel J. Divers, Group Worker 
Horace Buford, Club Worker 
Centenary Methodist Community Center, 612 
Monroe St., Nashville 8, Tenn. 
•Elizabeth Nowlin, Executive Director 
Jennette Griffin, Program Director 
Thomas Page, Athletic Director 
tJo Ann Richardson, Club Worker 
Mrs. Ernestine Williams, Kindergarten Teacher 

Wesley Community Center, 1024 E. Main St., 
Chattanooga 8, Tenn. 
•Pearle Edwards, Head Resident 
fTheresa Terry, Group Worker 
Mrs. John Simpson, Nursery Teacher 
Mrs. Lyman Boleman, Nursery Teacher 
Mrs. Loyce Owens, Recreation Worker 
Farris Robinson, Recreation Worker 



Wesley Settlement House, 923 Dameron Ave., 
N. W., Knoxville 16, Tenn. 
Mrs. Josephine F. Maskall, Acting Director 
•Lola Timm, Kindergarten Teacher 

Wesley House, 562 N. Fifth St., Memphis 5, 
Tenn. 
flEthel R. Decker, Head Resident 
A Edna C. Poole, Group Worker 
•Leota E. Kruger, Children's Worker 

Texas — 

Bethlehem Center, 4410 Leland Ave., Dallas 15, 
Tex. 
•Ruby Berkley, Director 
tOlive Hicks, Girls' Worker 
Ruby Kimble, Children's Worker 

Bethlehem Center, 970 E. Humbolt St., Fort 
Worth 4, Tex. 
fl Robert E. Shrider, Director 
•Lucy R. Gist, Girls' Worker 
Roosevelt Jones, Boys' Worker 
tBetty Sue Harris, Girls' Club Worker 

Good Neighbor Settlement House, 13th and Tyler 
Sts., Brownsville, Tex. 
Mrs. May Johnson Alvirez, Director 
Kindergarten Work on Mexican Border 

•Mattie Varn, Supervisor (952 Palm Blvd., 
Apt. No. 5, Brownsville, Tex.) 
Brownsville, Tex. 
Mrs. Laurencia C. Guzman, Kindergarten 
Teacher (Rt. 2, Box 447, Brownsville, 
Tex.) 
McAllen. Tex. 
Mrs. F. T. Livingston, Kindergarten Teacher 
(330 W. Cherokee St., Pharr, Tex.) 

Mission, Tex. 
Mrs. Marie M. de la Garza, Kindergarten 
Teacher (Box 702, Mission, Tex.) 
Rio Grande City, Tex. 
Mrs. Adela Gutierrez, Kindergarten Teacher 
(203 N. Corpus St., Rio Grande City, 
Tex.) 

Latin American Methodist Mission, 2819 Vine 
St., Dallas, Tex. 
•Darla Brown, Kindergarten and Club Worker 
Wesley House, P. O. Box 1315, Amarillo, Tex. 
Mary Jane Turrentine, Acting Director 

Wesley Community Center, 2502 N. Akard St., 
Dallas 4, Tex. 
•Mary L. Bope, Head Resident 
tAnn Havens, Group Worker 
Mrs. E. E. Monteith, Kindergarten Teacher 

Wesley Community House, 2131 N. Commerce, 
Fort Worth 6, Tex. 
•Ruth Fuessler, Head Resident 
Lillian Hilburn, Kindergarten Teacher 

Wesley Community House, 1011 Elysian St., 
Houston 10, Tex. 
•Inez Martin, Head Resident 
Mrs. Martha Gwyn, Group Worker 

Wesley Community House, 150 Colima St., San 
Antonio 7, Tex. 
•Mabel Clark, Head Resident 
Mrs. Bess Hearn, Clinic Supervisor 
Mrs. Olga Tafolla, Kindergarten Teacher 
Mrs. Pearl Peacock, Playground Director 
tCornelia Gray, Group Worker 

Whosoever Community House, 310 S. San Saba 
St., San Antonio 7, Tex. 
•Martha Robinson, Director 
Mrs. Mary G. Keefe, Kindergarten Teacher 



•Deaconess. IU.S.-2. flHome Missionary. 



Workers and Projects in Urban Work 



69 



Virginia — 

Bethlehem Center, 1016 State St., Richmond 
23, Va. 
•Ida Bilger, Director 
•Adair Myer, Club Worker 
Mrs. Ida J. Thompson, Kindergarten Teacher 
Mrs. Lucile B. Giles, Girls' Worker 
F. N. Christian, Boys' Worker 

Wesley Community House, 626 Upper St., Dan- 
ville, Va. 
Mrs. John Mendes, Head Resident 
Mrs. Nadine J. Gammon, Head Nursery and 

Kindergarten Teacher 
Mrs. Leonard Allmond, Nursery and Kinder- 
garten Assistant 



Wesley Community Center, 229 Henry St., 
Portsmouth, Va. 
*Eva Crenshaw, Head Resident 
Mrs. Lillie Gilliam, Kindergarten Teacher 
Mrs. Mary Lee, Asst. Kindergarten Teacher 

Washington — 

Seattle Atlantic Street Center, 2103 Atlantic 
St., Seattle 44, Wash. 
Tsuguo Ikeda, Director 
Alexandra Pye, Group Work Supervisor 

Tacoma Community House, 1311 S. M St., 
Tacoma 5, Wash. 
•Eunice Allen, Director 
tDoris M. Detweiler, Group Worker 



URBAN WORK— Conference 



California — 

Church of All Nations, 824 E. Sixth St., Los 
Angeles 21, Calif. 
•Frances A. Taylor, Kindergarten Teacher 

Colorado— 

Spanish Work, Fort Lupton, Colo. 



Spanish Work, Denver, Colo. 
•Martha Bebermeyer, Community Worker (c/o 
Epworth Methodist Church, 1130 31st St., 
Denver 5, Colo.) 

Delaware — 

Mary Todd Gambrill Neighborhood House, 400 S. 
Heald St., Wilmington 1, Del. 
•Genevieve C. Poppe, Director 
Beatrice Jindra, Group Worker 

Riddle Memorial Deaconess Home and Center, 
307 West St., Wilmington 1, Del. 
•Genevieve C. Poppe, Director 
Emily Morgan, Group Worker 

Illinois — 

St. Matthew's Methodist Church, 1000 Orleans 
St., Chicago 10, 111. 
Mineola Booker, Youth Worker 

Iowa — 

Bidwbll-Riverside Community Center, 1203 
Hartford Ave., Des Moines 15, Iowa 
•Julia L. Tompos, Director 
•Effie Lewton, Extension Group Worker 

Harrtet Ballou Day Nursery, 312 S. Wall St., 
Box 1438, Sioux City, Iowa 
ffjoy L. Smith, Supervisor 
Grace M. Gillispie, Program Director 
Barbara Thompson, Group Worker 
•Lela Powers, Preschool Teacher 

John Hubs Methodist Church, Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa 
Ruth Husband, Supply Pastor 

Wall Street Mission, 312 S. Wall St., Sioux 
City, Iowa 
II Joy L. Smith, Social Worker 

Kansas— 

Mexican Mission, 905 S. St. Francis St., Wich- 
ita 11, Kan. 



Maryland 

Broadway-East Baltimore Parish Project, 2614 
E. Baltimore St., Baltimore 24, Md. 
Frances M. Kieffer, Children's Worker 

Massachusetts — 

Hattie B. Cooper Community Centre, 716 Shaw- 
mut Ave., Roxbury 19, Mass. 
Mary Holman, Acting Director 
Mrs. Annie L. Hyman, Nursery School Direc- 
tor 
Mrs. Eleanor Morris, Nursery Teacher 
Mrs. Hazel Brothers, Nursery Teacher 
Mrs. Frances Palmer, Group Worker 

Michigan — 

City Missions, Detroit, Mich. 



Methodist Community House, 904 Sheldon Ave., 
S. E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Mrs. Lawrence Voss, Acting Director 
Mrs. Margaret White, Group Work Super- 
visor 

Mississippi — 

First Methodist Church, Box 245, Greenville, 
Miss. 
•Louise Law, Social Worker 

Nebraska — 

Neighborhood House, 2201 Cass St., Omaha 5, 
Neb. 
Mrs. Henry E. Hoyer, Executive Director 
Barbara J. Dunn, Group Worker 

New Jersey — 

Deaconess Work, Newark Conference 
•May L. Webster, Community Worker (2811 

Hudson Blvd., Jersey City 6, N. J.) 
*Ula M. Garrison, Community Worker (198 

Summer Ave., Newark 4., N. Y.) 

New Jersey Conference Deaconess Home and 
Community Center, 278 Kaighn Ave., Cam- 
den 3, N. J. 
•Ruth A. Flaherty, Superintendent 
•Marie H. Frakes, Nursery School Teacher 

New York — 

Brooklyn Deaconess Work 
Janes Methodist Church 
Lucy D. Jackson (174 Reid Ave., Brooklyn 
21, N.Y.) 



•Deaconess. 



tU.S.-2. 



H Home Missionary. 



70 



(South Third Street Church) 



Warren Street Church 

Mrs. Ida Harrison (242 Baltic St., Brooklyn 
2, N. Y.) 

Jefferson Park Fresh Air Camp (Long Branch, 
N. J.) 



Ohio — 

West Side Community House, 3000 Bridge Ave., 

Cleveland 13, Ohio 
Bernard S. Houghton, Executive Director 
John Eichenberger, Program Director 
Dorothy Newman, Group Worker 
Mrs. Bernard S. Houghton, Director Day 

Care Center 
Mrs. Marguerite Norris, Head Day Care 

Teacher 
Betty Slavick, Day Care Teacher 
Mrs. Doris D. Hundley, Day Care Teacher 

Pennsylvania — 

Methodist Deaconess Home and Centers, Resi- 
dent House and Office, 114-116 S. 38th St., 
Philadelphia 4, Pa. 
Eastwick Community Center, 8438 Eastwick 

Ave. 
Mt. Zion Community Center, 1530-38 N. 

nth st. 

Hospital Visitation Service, Philadelphia 

General Hospital 
*Hazel M. Horner, Director 
*Lena V. McRoberts, Group Worker 

Dorothy A. Hughlett, Group Worker 



Janet Smith, Group Worker 
Carol Miller, Group Worker 

Methodist Mission, 1220 N. 7th St., Harris- 
burg, Pa. 
"Helene Hill, Director 
Bessie Braxton, Kindergarten Teacher 
Mrs. Oliver Jackson, Kindergarten Teacher 

William Howard Day Project, 1300 Community 
Dr., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Rose King, Kindergarten Teacher 



142 Dodge St., 



Rhode Island — 

Methodist Service Center, 
Providence, R. I. 
Gwen Jackson, Director 

Tennessee — 

Wesley House Centers, 129 Wharf Ave., Nash- 
ville 10, Tenn. 

Lucy Holt Moore Center 

Sudekum Center 

Napier Center 

Dorothy R. Chapman, Executive Director 
*Lee Ola Foust, Group Worker 
*Lora Mort, Group Worker 

Mrs. Ray Tribble, Group Worker 

Mrs. Theodore Wood, Group Worker 
*Irene Heatherington, Group Worker 

Washington — 

Japanese Methodist Mission, 507 S. Grant St. 
Spokane 10, Wash. 



*Deaconess. 



NEW VICE-PRESIDENTS OF THE WOMAN'S DIVISION 




MRS. JOHN M. PEARSON 
Newburgh, New York 

Chairman of the 

Department of Work in 

Foreign Fields 



MRS. C. P. HARDIN 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

Chairman of the 

Department of Work in 

Home Fields 



MRS. A. R. HENRY 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Chairman of the 

Department of Christian 

Social Relations 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 

Someone has said that "to do the impossible one must see the 
invisible." On the following pages the executive secretaries of the 
Department of Work in Foreign Fields relate accomplishments in their 
respective fields. Much of the work would have been impossible had 
not those who labored together with God to make real the spirit of 
Christ for all of life seen the invisible possibilities and the worth of 

— Mrs. Charles E. Wegner, Chairman 



Africa and Europe 

By Ruth Lawrence, Executive Secretary 

AS THE new quadrennium in our church program begins, the eyes of the world 
J^^ are focused on the continent of Africa where great changes along political, 
economic, sociological, and racial lines are taking place. They are watching 
the Union of South Africa as she implements her policy of apartheid, or segre- 
gation; the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland, as it works to develop demo- 
cratic parliamentary government in which the multiracial population will share; 
and Kenya, where both government and Church are endeavoring to rehabilitate 
the Kikuyu tribespeople who are more and more repudiating their Mau Mau 
loyalties. Although Morocco and Tunisia, former protectorates of France, both ob- 
tained their independence a few months ago, Algeria's rebellion continues with few 
signs of early negotiations for peace. Eyes are turned on Liberia, called the "pioneer" 
in the movement for freedom among Africans, as she shapes her own destiny, and 
to the African territories throughout the continent which, one by one, are moving 
toward self-government. 

The latest event to attract attention to Africa is the recent nationalization 
of the Suez Canal by President Nasser of Egypt which caused twenty-two non- 
Africa nations to meet in London for a conference on the matter. 

The historical, economic, and political forces which are shaping the new Africa 
are moving very fast. We are told that the time is short, perhaps no longer than 
ten years, in which to make the necessary changes and build a sound democratic, 
religious, and moral foundation for an enviornment in which this new Africa can 
grow and develop in peace. There is a sense of urgency in regard to Africa on the 
part of the Church and of all other movements and organizations which would help 
her develop her great national, economic, social, and spiritual potentialities. 

Interfield Consultation 

One hundred and thirty-five Methodists from thirty-six countries met at 
Epworth-by-the-Sea, St. Simon's Island, Georgia, from April 4-15, 1956 for the 
Interfield Consultation, a conference called by the Board of Missions' Interdi- 
vision Committee on Foreign Work, to review the advance in missions during the 
past quadrennium and to plan a broad strategy for the next four years. A similar 
conference had been held in Colorado Springs, Colorado, just prior to the 1952 

71 



72 Africa 

General Conference, to discuss questions which, at that time, seemed of primary 
urgency as related to the propagation of the Christian faith. 

The representatives from Africa to the Interfield Consultation this year were 
the following: Bishop Newell S. Booth, Elisabethville Area, Africa; Bishop Willis 
J. King, Liberia; Bishop Ferdinand Sigg, Geneva Area, Europe and North Africa; 
Miss Mildred Black, Liberia; Rev. J. K. Nimene, Liberia; Rev. J. J. Miguel, 
Angola; Rev. Juel Nordby, Angola; Miss Catherine Parham, Southern Belgian 
Congo; Rev. Jean Mij, Southern Belgian Congo; Mrs. Telesia Shaumba, Central 
Belgian Congo; Miss Annie Laura Winfrey, Central Belgian Congo; Rev. J. W. 
Shungu, Central Belgian Congo; Miss Vivian Otto, Southern Rhodesia; Rev. 
Samuel Chieza, Southern Rhodesia; Mrs. Julian Rea, Portuguese East Africa; Rev. 
Hans Aurbakken, North Africa; Miss Lorena Kelly, Belgian Congo. 

The following excerpts from the report of the discussions on the Africa Area 
indicate some of the problems the Church in Africa is facing today, as well as the 
thinking of the national and missionary leaders: 

The purpose (of our group discussion) was to seek afresh, under the guid- 
ance of the Holy Spirit, a common mind regarding the purpose of our mission, 
and to recommit ourselves in obedience to God in carrying out that purpose. 

We do not claim any originality in what was brought up. We brought 
it with us from the field and at the consultation it was confronted with the 
thoughts of our fellow Christians from other parts of the world. 

Our purpose: What was most in our thoughts regarding the purpose of 
our work in Africa was clearly stated by Dr. Charles Ranson: "We must 
not become so preoccupied with the pressing detail of our present duty that 
we lose the vision of the goal of all our seeking, nor must we become so 
immersed in the broad and deep waters of theological generalization that we 
obscure the biblical truth that Christian obedience is always related to a con- 
crete situation." 

Confronting other groups — Of the various "other groups" seeking for the 
allegiance of man, which were discussed in our plenary sessions, some are met 
in Africa: Roman Catholicism, non-cooperative Protestant bodies (sects, 
fringe groups), Islam and communism, and we may add ideologies and emo- 
tional movements and resurgent nativism. Prior to the advent of Western civi- 
lization, African life was marked by its wholeness and oneness. Their magico- 
religious beliefs were the "cement" that kept the society together. With the 
social upheaval and change of the modern Africa, there is quest for a new 
faith and an integrating force. 

This quest is a challenge to us Christians, but the Protestant churches 
do not always have a "free market" where there can be a confrontation be- 
tween two religions or ideologies. Frequently we meet these "religions" com- 
bined with political systems and powers, for example, Roman Catholicism 
combined with the State in a national church. We are not called upon to be 
anti-Catholic, but pro-evangelical. We are to do a better job and through our 
Christian devotion demonstrate the truth and genuineness of our faith, and seek 
to work together on one front. 

Regarding Islam, it was pointed out that every believer is a missionary, 
that Islam is spread in Africa mainly by traders. Islam is still marching, even 
though the advance seems to have been slowed down somewhat. Standing 
strongly for anti-colonialism and nationalism, disregarding racial differences and 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 73 

accommodating to the local conditions and customs, Islam has a strong appeal 
to the Africans. 

The fast changing social and economic conditions, the quest for freedom 
and independence, dissatisfaction on the part of the growing middle class, 
skilled and semiskilled workers and the intelligentsia, and lack of ways to 
express their growing political concern, make fertile soil for Communist in- 
filtration. Particularly dangerous is this where living standards and education 
are going ahead and constitutional political channels are not provided. 

Missionary Vocation — Two of the three main questions discussed were: 

1. A definite lack of missionary vocation in our churches in Africa. The 
Church has been successfully transplanted; but we missionaries have not been 
able to transplant the spirit which created in us a concern for those outside 
the Church and in foreign countries and which compelled us to leave our 
home churches and go to peoples of different language, race, and culture. And 
with the tremendous opportunity and challenge, it is vital that the missionary 
responsibility be accepted by the church in Africa. 

2. The short-term missionary program. We wish to express our approval 
of the short-term missionary program even though we recognize the disad- 
vantages of immaturity and shortness of preparation, and also realize that it 
will never be a substitute for full-time missionary service. It has a distinct 
value as a supplement for the regular staff. We favor the program because: 

(a) The short-term missionaries make a contribution to the entire mis- 
sionary program and are outstanding in their work with youth. 

(b) A large percentage of them return as full-time workers. 

(c) They have a definiteness of purpose and maturity when they return 
to the homeland for further preparation. 

(d) Upon their return to the homeland they are good ambassadors for 
the missionary cause among young people in their home churches. 

Christian Unity — It was not so much the form of unity as the content, that 
occupied us. We realize that in the "younger churches" the denominational 
traditions and the international ties within the denominations are not as 
strongly felt as the feeling of unity on a local level, and added to this spiritual 
unity we find the demand for national unity. The feeling of unity is more 
often felt between Methodists and, for example, Presbyterians within the same 
ethnic and cultural group, than between Methodists of two different racial 
groups or in two different countries, perhaps far away from each other. 

We appreciate this feeling of unity in a cultural context. It tells us that the 
Church has taken root and form in that culture; but we see today also the 
danger of separative nationalism and racialism. We felt, therefore, that the best 
pattern of unity in Africa is not a structural church union on local level to 
exclusion of wider denominational unity, but in the unity of fellowship which 
can be realized in a common goal, a united front, and interdenominational 
projects, doing things together because we are Christian brethren. These 
thoughts came to expression in our recommendations: 

Reaffirming our historic position of unity in Christ, we regret the tendency 
in some areas toward separation based on race or class, and call the 
Methodists everywhere to join hands in fellowship and work that a unified 
Christian witness may be made before a non-Christian world. 



74 Africa 

Evangelism — The consideration of the importance of evangelism was foremost 
at the Interfield Consultation. We felt it must be a quadrennium during which 
"The Call to Witness and Decision" should get hold of all of us, the missionaries, 
the African ministers, the lay people, and the newly-won converts. It was fur- 
ther felt that in all our preparation and planning and activity there had to 
be an expression of the burning heart, and that the fundamental preparation 
should be prayer and Bible study. Our goal should be: 

(1) To break out of our isolation and evangelize unevangelized areas in 
our own life and in the life of the Church, and 

(2) To bring people untouched by the Gospel into fellowship with Christ 
and integrate them fully into the fellowship of the Church. 

It was found that of the 40,000 new converts in the Elisabethville Area during 
the last quadrennium almost one-third was lost, and another fact was the great 
number of members on trial. We have failed to nurture the new Christians, 
and we have failed to prepare our lay and ordained church workers for this 
task of nurturing. 

In one field the church workers found there was something wrong in their 
evangelistic attitude. They did not succeed in "converting the heathen," but 
when they went out to help the "Christians of tomorrow" they were surprised 
to see how many were ready to become "Christians of today." It is certainly 
right that evangelism means to confront people with Jesus Christ. This is 
usually done in the proclamation of the sharing of our personal experience of 
Christ. We expect, therefore, that in each conference at least one experienced 
and trained missionary couple should be set aside for the task of organizing, 
preparing and conducting evangelistic campaigns. 

We need literature on evangelistic methods and for the preparation for full 
membership. Personnel and funds must be made available for this task; re- 
volving funds for printing, and a program for the distribution and use of the 
literature. 

But if we are going to be able adequately to take care of the harvest we 
envisage, new effort must be put on the recruiting and training of ministers. 
There are about 12 churches or preaching places for each ordained minister 
and there are about 13 African workers to each missionary. In order to keep 
up with the increase of missionary staff alone we must at least increase our 
African staff with about 100 workers a year. 

Quadrennial Emphasis 1956-1960 
The Belgian Congo 

In the joint program of the Department of Work in Foreign Fields of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service and the Division of World Missions for the 
1956-1960 quadrennium, the plan is to mobilize forces to strike with power at the 
places of greatest opportunity. Although, in every field, the Church confronts vital 
opportunities, there are four specific geographical areas where the hour of decision 
is upon the Church, and where now is the time to strike. 

One of these "lands of decision" is the Belgian Congo in Central Africa. 

The Christian Church may face in Africa the most massive single oppor- 
tunity of its history. Here is the first time that the challenge of an entire 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 75 

continent has confronted the Church with such a limited timetable. It is quite 
possible that within our lifetime Central Africa might become one of the 
vigorous centers of world Christianity. It is also quite possible that this vast 
region might become solidly Muslim or fanatically Communist. For Methodism 
the Belgian Congo is the African country where the next years are most critical. 
Our Church there is confronted by vast numbers who believe that Christianity 
is their best chance for a new life, but who will turn to other faiths if they do 
not have an opportunity to try Christianity soon. We must bring them into 
the Church. 1 

This special emphasis on the Belgian Congo will be on three aspects of work 
there : 

First, there will be a rural evangelistic emphasis in the region of Lomela which 
lies in the Equatorial Forest Belt, 160 miles northeast of Lodja and 120 miles north- 
west of Katako Kombe, two of our important mission stations. In this area live 
more than 40,000 Africans, most of whom speak the Otetela dialect. At the present 
time we have in this region only one ordained minister supervising the activities of 
ten supply pastors and only three schools with one or two classes each. The people 
are currently responsive to the Gospel. The urgent need is for a limited local mis- 
sionary staff to supervise the educational and evangelistic effort and to encourage 
the African leaders in this primitive and isolated area. When we are able to send 
a few missionaries to Lomela, perhaps two couples and two single women, we will 
have occupied geographically all the Batatela area of the Central Congo. 

Second, there is to be an emphasis on secondary education by cooperating 
with the Board of Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States in 
the further development of the high school, now at Mutoto but soon to be moved 
to Katubue. This is one of the two full high schools in the Belgian Congo. 

The government is establishing a university at Elisabethville and it is of the 
greatest urgency that opportunities be provided Christian African youth to prepare 
themselves for the higher education now becoming available to them. 

At present the high school can accommodate only a limited number of young 
people, but plans have been made to enlarge the school plant in a new location 
and increase the staff. Although the school is coeducational in principle, no girl 
has yet qualified for entrance. The plans for the enlarged school include a boarding 
department for girls as well as courses in home economics. A missionary of the 
Woman's Division is a member of the present faculty, and it is hoped that before 
long there will be girls in the student body. 

Third, there will be an emphasis on urban work in the southern part of the 
Belgian Congo where thousands of village people are moving into mining and 
industrial centers to work. This movement of the Africans to the cities presents a 
great challenge to the Church and affords us one of our greatest opportunities for 
evangelism. One of the most urgent needs is to strengthen our work in the urban 
centers such as Kolwezi and Kindu. Probably one-fourth of our Methodist con- 
stituency is centered around a dozen cities. Especially in missionary personnel we 
must give more attention to urban work. 

This seems to be the decade of opportunity for Africa. In evangelism, educa- 
tion, medicine, and other social services the doors are, in general, opened wide. 
Some fear that if we do not enter now the Church will have lost its greatest oppor- 
tunity for winning Africa to Christianity. 

1 The Call to Witness and Decision, 1956-1960 Quadrennium ; page 3. 



76 Africa 




Some members of the 
Africa delegation at 
lnterfield Consultation, 
Epworth-by-the- Sea, 
Georgia, April, 1956. 



Consultations on Christian Education 

One of the most pressing needs in Africa today is for appropriate curriculum ma- 
terial in Christian education for use in both Sunday schools and day schools. During 
the past year the World Council of Christian Education and Sunday School Associa- 
tion, and the Africa Committee of the Division of Foreign Missions of the National 
Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America, in collaboration 
with the Christian Councils in Africa, took steps to help meet this need by arrang- 
ing four conferences on Christian education in four different regions of Africa, south 
of the Sahara. The chief consultant for these gatherings was Mrs. Floyd Shacklock, 
counselor of the Joint Committee on Christian Education in Foreign Fields. 

The first conference met in Nairobi, Kenya, December 12-16, 1955 and brought 
together nine delegates and four observers from Tanganyika, Uganda, and Kenya. 
The second gathered in Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia, February 6-17, 1956, with 
twenty-two delegates who came from Madagascar, Mozambique, both Northern and 
Southern Rhodesia, Nyasaland, and the Union of South Africa. The third met at 
Leopoldville, Belgian Congo, March 7-13, 1956, with nine delegates and three 
observers from Angola, Belgian Congo, and Cameroun, in West Africa. To the last 
one, meeting at Accra, Gold Coast, March 19-24, 1956, came ten delegates and 
eight observers from the Gold Coast, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria. 

The twofold task of these conferences was to consider ways in which churches 
can develop more adequate teaching materials for children, youth, and adults, and 
to help find leaders capable of using these materials. African and missionary leaders 
together studied the possibilities of the production of common material that can 
be used by the different denominations in Africa in their work of Christian educa- 
tion in changing Africa. Reports from these conferences reveal an enthusiastic in- 
terest in the problem of preparing Sunday-school lesson material in keeping with 
African life and culture with suitable teaching helps, as well as youth leadership 
training materials. 

The next step toward better Christian education in Africa will be a four- 
weeks' workshop held in the Methodist Mission station of Old Umtali, Southern 
Rhodesia, in August, 1956. Here actual lesson outlines will be developed. The Rev. 
Nelson Chappel, General Secretary, of the World Council of Christian Education 
and Sunday School Association will be present at the workshop together with dele- 
gates from churches in Africa. 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 



77 




Girls at their dormitories welcome the executive 

secretary on her first visit to Wembo Nyama, 

Central Belgian Congo. 



Secretarial Visit 

The executive secretary- 
made her first official visit to 
the fields during the past year 
from August 24, 1955 to Janu- 
ary 6, 1956. It was very for- 
tunate that she could go at 
the same time as the experi- 
enced administrative secretary 
of the Division of World Mis- 
sions and that the two could 
visit and study the work on 
the fields together. 

During these four and a 
half months all of the major 
stations and some of the vil- 
lage work in the seven con- 
ferences were visited. The 
long distances from continent 
to continent were covered by 
plane, but traveling in Africa itself was by car. This afforded the rare privilege 
of seeing the countryside and visiting many villages where our church is working. 
Two things which impressed this secretary most were: first, the responsiveness 
of Africans, women and girls, as well as men and boys, to the Gospel; and second, 
the shortage of missionary personnel which meant overworked missionaries on nearly 
every station. Some missionaries were postponing their furloughs a year because 
there was no one to take up the work during their absence. 

In spite of too few work- 
ers much progress was evi- 
dent. In Southern Rhodesia g||| 
alone a social-evangelistic hall, 
recently added to the African 
Girls' Hostel at Umtali, and a 
new Teacher Training School 
building at Old Umtali, were 
dedicated and the cornerstone 
of a large home economics 
building at Nyadiri was laid. 
It was encouraging to see the 
large nursing unit of the 
Washburn Memorial Hospital, 
also at Nyadiri, nearing com- 
pletion after seeing the 
crowded conditions in the 
building then in use. 

In one of the African lo- 
cations of the city of Jadot- 

ville, Southern Belgian Congo, a beautiful large church was dedicated. Churches 
and schoolhouses were being erected in many places, and often by the Africans 
themselves. In Liberia two hostels for girls were going up, while an addition to a 




The choir, under the direction of their house- 
mother, singing at the dedication service of 
MacKinnon Hall, African Girls' Hostel, Umtali, 
Southern Rhodesia. 




First unit of the Methodist Hostel for 
Girls, Monrovia, Liberia. 



Schoolgirls and housemother at Katako 
Konibe, Belgian Congo, will soon have 
two brick cottages to replace their leaf- 
thatched huts. 




Leprosarium, Canta, Liberia, joint proj- 
ect of the two Divisions together with 
the American Leprosy Missions. 



Mulungwishi, Belgian Congo — the dor- 
mitory girls with two A-3's, the first 
missionaries of the Woman's Division 
for this station. 




Miss Ruth Lawrence, executive secretary 
(second from left), and staff at Les 
Ouadhias, Algeria, in front of the mis- 
sionary residence which is nearing com- 
pletion. 



Hospital, Gikuki, Portuguese East Af- 
rica (Mozambique), a joint project of 
the two Divisions. 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 79 

third one was being planned. In Quessua, Angola, and at Les Ouadhias, Algeria, 
residences for missionaries were nearing completion. Better homes for African staff 
members were also being built on all of the fields. In both Lodja and Kapanga, 
Belgian Congo, conference schools of home economics were being developed. Unfor- 
tunately the one at Kapanga has had to be discontinued for the present. Boarding 
departments for school girls were being improved by the addition of new cottages 
on several stations. 

Your secretary is very grateful for having had this opportunity of visiting her 
area so soon after coming into office. It is much easier now to visualize locations, 
projects, and personnel as well as to understand the work with its possibilities and 
problems. 

Principles for Cooperation in Africa 

Soon after returning from the visit to Africa the secretaries drew up a set 
of Principles for Cooperation in Africa between the two divisions and in union 
with other Christian bodies. Upon their presentation to the respective executive com- 
mittees of the Board of Missions, they were enthusiastically approved with the hope 
that their application on the field would usher in a new day of more fruitful coopera- 
tion in the common task of meeting the great challenges that Africa presents to 
the world today. 

In various parts of Africa different traditions of cooperation between the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service and the Division of World Missions have 
developed. In an attempt to establish more uniformity, which will make for better 
understanding and more harmonious relationships between the Department of 
Work in Foreign Fields of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, and the 
Division of World Missions, in their joint projects in Africa, these principles were 
approved by the Interdivision Committee and the two staffs. 

For the healthy growth of the Church in Africa, as well as elsewhere in the 
world, there must be a deep sense of commitment to Christ and His Kingdom on 
the part of all Christians. Insofar as possible, the responsibility for the total pro- 
gram of the church should rest upon the local community. However, under certain 
circumstances it is not yet possible for the local community in Africa to assume 
full responsibility. It is in these instances that the principles apply. 

New Work 

Some years ago the Woman's Division committed itself to join the Division of 
World Missions in the work at Mulungwishi in the Southern Belgian Congo Con- 
ference and at Katako Kombe and Kindu in the Central Belgian Congo Conference 
as soon as funds and personnel became available. For several years funds have 
been held for this work. By September, 1956, we will have sent missionaries to 
represent the Woman's Division on two of the three stations. 

In November, 1955, Misses Florence McKay and Elizabeth Ann Whyte, special- 
term missionaries, just graduated from college, arrived at Mulungwishi to take 
charge of the new hostel for school girls and to teach in the station school. In 
anticipation of their arrival, missionaries of the Division of World Missions had 
two cottages of the new hostel for girls, as well as a small residence for the two 
missionaries, almost ready for occupancy. 

In September, 1956, two experienced missionaries, Miss Dorothy Rees, educa- 
tional and social worker, and Miss Kathryn Eye, R.N. will begin work at Katako 
Kombe. Miss Rees will have charge of the girls' hostel as well as of the arts and 



80 Africa 

crafts program on the station and in the district. Miss Eye will be responsible for 
the station dispensary and the medical work in the outlying rural area. 

Other stations are calling for missionaries of the Woman's Division but they, 
like Kindu, must wait until more personnel becomes available. 

Missionary Personnel 

By January, 1957 there will be 75 missionaries on the field, 15 on furlough, 
and three new regular missionaries studying language in Europe. Of those on the 
field 20 are special term missionaries, serving for only three years. During the 
year two missionaries have retired, three have withdrawn to marry, and three 
have completed their special terms of service. 

We are very happy to report that we now have three young women from the 
Central Jurisdiction on the fist of missionaries for Africa. Miss Barbara Patterson, 
now teaching in the College of West Africa, Monrovia, Liberia, and Miss Alberteen 
Ware who has finished her study of Portuguese at Lisbon and expects to sail soon 
for Angola, are both special-term missionaries. Miss Pearl Bellinger, formerly a 
special term missionary in India, is studying French in Brussels in preparation for 
service as a regular missionary in the Belgian Congo. 

Since the last annual report was prepared, August, 1955, 17 new missionaries 
have either arrived or are on their way to the field. 

European Missionaries 

Methodist missionaries in Africa are far from being a purely American group. 
Among them are Scandinavians, Belgians, French, Swiss, Portuguese, and British. 
Of the approximately one hundred missionaries of the Woman's Division now serv- 
ing in Africa, fifteen are from Europe. Names are listed in the roster of foreign 
missionaries, pp. 32-39. 

Aside from those already on the field, there are several candidates in Europe 
preparing to join them during the next two or three years. Their arrival is eagerly 
awaited in Africa. 

There is general agreement that missionaries of the Woman's Society of 
Christian Service of European conferences will be commissioned as missionaries 
of the Woman's Division of Christian Service of the Board of Missions and 
Church Extension. In some cases their support will be paid entirely by the 
European conference from which they come and in other cases, in whole 
or in part, from the appropriations of the Woman's Division of Christian 
Service. This policy was voted several years ago, but better understanding con- 
cerning it has grown, and experience is proving that the policy is wise. The mis- 
sionaries from Europe are bringing not only needed reinforcements, but en- 
richment and inspiration to the mission fields in which they are working. 1 

We rejoice in this privilege of working together with the Methodist women in 
Europe for the advancement of the cause of Christ on this great continent. 



1 By His Light. Ninth Annual Report of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, 1948-1949, page 28. 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 81 

SOUTHERN ASIA 
India, Pakistan, Nepal 

By Lucile Colony, Executive Secretary 

METHODISTS in Southern Asia have looked forward with increasing eagerness 
to this year. It marks the completion of one hundred years since the arrival 
of Dr. and Mrs. William Butler and their little family. Thirteen years after 
the Butlers the first missionaries of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, Dr. 
Clara Swain and Miss Isabella Thoburn, went to India. Before these two women 
began their work the wives of missionaries, in addition to home responsibilities, 
gave much time to the special needs of women and children. 

Since 1870 the volume of work for women and children, which has meant the 
establishment of numerous schools and colleges, social services, religious instruction, 
adult literacy, the preparation of literature, family life programs, public health 
teaching, and medical care, has been largely the responsibility of single women. 
Their work is but part of the total witness and program of the church. Together 
with all Methodists they approach the centennial strengthened by the unmistakable, 
steady, forward movement of the Spirit. They are quietly confident amid the per- 
plexities of the present situation. It is recognized that a new era in missionary 
service has begun, one in which people from every land will work together in the 
enormous, world-wide task of evangelism. At the moment much thought is given 
to the place of missionaries in India today. 

A distinguished Christian Indian, speaking recently on the function of mis- 
sionaries in the new India, expressed appreciation of the impression made in the 
past by the example of their dedicated lives. The ideal of India has always been the 
life of renunciation. Missionaries have had a peculiar opportunity to embody this 
ideal. This being true, there must be an explanation of the antimissionary feeling 
so often expressed today. 

In a country newly independent, it is only natural that nationalism should be 
strong; natural, also, that Indians should wish to manage their own affairs. Mistrust 
of the West in international life has been a factor arousing antimissionary feelings. 
It is not strange, furthermore, that staunch non-Christian nationalists feel some 
resentment toward those who come from abroad, claiming to have something better 
than that which is found in India. 

Disapproval of missionaries is not universal. Quite the contrary. Even state- 
ments made to discourage the presence and work of missionaries often praise them 
for their unselfish service. For example, the report of the Christian Missionary 
Activities Enquiry Committee, set up by the government of Madhya Pradesh, 
so much publicized since it was issued July 17, 1956, makes strong recommendations 
for the withdrawal of missionaries "whose primary interest is in proselytizing." 
It regrets the increased number of missionaries since 1947. It fears that "evange- 
lization in India serves a world policy to revive Christendom for re-establishing 
western supremacy and is not prompted by spiritual motives." Yet it ends with 
appreciation of missionaries for their contribution "in shaping Indian life in modern 
times which has been very impressive," and concludes: "Apart from the contro- 
versy on the point of proselytization, missionaries merit high appreciation as 
pioneers in the fields of education and medical relief." 

Actually, there is less fear of the presence of missionaries as time goes on. The 
attack now seems to be directed toward foreign support of evangelism. 



82 India 

This whole controversy over foreigners and evangelism places new responsibility 
on the Indian church. Without doubt, direct evangelistic work in the future will 
be carried on more largely by Indians. No Christian, missionary or Indian, will 
decry this situation if the response to the challenge is fully met by the Indian 
church, and if the finest leaders are trained for the task. Missionaries now must 
be concerned with the strengthening of the church as their first task. They can 
leave its expansion to the Indian members on whom God will lay His hand. They 
will go out in the name of Christ as evangelists. 

There is still a place for missionaries. They are needed in medical and health 
work; in educational fields, such as teaching home economics and arts and crafts; 
training nursery school supervisors; in counseling, and vocational guidance. They 
must be persons of outstanding academic qualifications. They will be invited to 
undertake tasks for which Indian Christians are not available. Many in the Indian 
church welcome missionaries as friends and co-workers, as persons in whose lives 
the radiant presence of Jesus can be seen. Against such as these there is no closed 
door or national barrier. 

The time is here when the Indian Methodist Church should send its own mis- 
sionaries to other lands. Nepal is a natural field. It needs doctors, teachers, and adult 
literacy workers. Africa, China, Southeast Asia, and other lands will welcome 
Indian missionaries. The first step is for the church in India to revitalize its mis- 
sionary program. 

The Methodist Church in America is grateful for the presence of Indian Chris- 
tian students, and for the opportunity to meet the members of the Centenary Choir, 
who brought a blessing by their presence and their faith. We are in an interna- 
tional Christian relationship. The church in each land needs the contribution and 
strengthening of the other. 

Definite progress in every phase of the work should greatly encourage those 
who are interested. Admittedly, this is a time of change, sometimes disturbing, 
sometimes foreboding; but, in the final analysis, the work does not suffer. Advance 
has been made throughout. Lack of space prevents mention of every project, but 
there is opportunity to lift up a few. 

News Items 

Until 1953 there was only one Christian Medical College in all of India, located 
far to the south, at Vellore. The need for larger numbers of qualified doctors and 
nurses; the fact that Vellore could not cope with the numbers applying for ad- 
mission; and the willingness of the Central and Punjab State governments to 
cooperate in the up-grading of the sixty-year-old Christian Medical School at 
Ludhiana, brought mission boards to the decision to make Ludhiana a second ac- 
credited Christian Medical College. Amazing progress toward the realization of 
this purpose has been made during the past three years. A new and beautifully 
adequate hospital is under construction; more qualified instructors have joined the 
faculty; all departments have been strengthened; and in 1958 the first M.B., B.S. 
(Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Science) students will be graduated. Even so it 
cannot be denied that difficult problems still demand attention. Huge amounts of 
money, for instance, must be made available. The accomplishments of these three 
years warrant our faith for the future. 

Extension service of the Allahabad Agricultural Institute and the College of 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 83 

Home Economics has brought new methods and standards of life to 400 villages. 
The program is simple, but wonderfully effective. It is a matter of cooperation and 
a willingness to share. Extension workers share their knowledge with those willing 
to receive it and they in turn share and apply the knowledge received. This pro- 
gram is one which will continue to spread to other villages and affect the entire 
life of any given village. 

Isabella Thoburn College, like every other Christian college and school, has a 
most difficult problem each year to hold the enrollment down to the number of 
students who can be accommodated in the available facilities. There is demand for 
education. This college is now bilingual, or possibly one should say trilingual. 
Every student must study English, Hindi, and Sanskrit. Because of this the library 
has had to be enlarged and the faculty increased. It is hoped that memorial gifts 
this year will make possible the building of a library extension, to be known as the 
Sarah Chakko Library. A new wing has been added to the teachers' residence to ac- 
commodate additional faculty members. 

Madras Women's Christian College has a new president, Miss Renuka Muker- 
jee, formerly a professor at the Isabella Thoburn College. She was chosen as one 
of the nine college professors to come to the United States in 1955, by the Division 
of Foreign Missions of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United 
States of America to attend a Seminar on Christian Higher Education and the 
Assembly of the United Church Women. She is a beautiful person, brilliant of 
mind, devoted in spirit, and an able administrator. 

St. Christopher's Training College, Madras, was selected by the government 
of India for extension service in teaching. This program is supported by the Ford 
Foundation. 

Lai Bagh Higher Secondary School has five former Crusade Scholars on its 
teaching staff and another teacher on study leave in the United States. Each 
section of the school is now a complete unit with its own head and budget. These 
sections are: Nursery and Kindergarten, Primary, Middle and High, and the Higher 
Secondary (junior college). There is one principal responsible for the entire school. 
Two new buildings have been dedicated this year, a gymnasium (our only one in 
India) and a nursery school. 

Christian literature has increased greatly, thanks to a splendid Methodist Pub- 
lishing House, with devoted personnel and up-to-date machines, and to a Director 
of Literature for the whole of the Methodist Church in India. He has inspiring 
and creative ability in finding materials for publication and keeping literature 
moving. He is also brimful of new ideas for making literature attractive and 
available for both the church and others who are eager for good reading. 

Each of the nine annual conferences has made progressive strides during the 
year. In Bengal the Women's Union Christian College has been aided by gifts 
from the Woman's Division in the purchase of property on an adjoining compound. 
This provides much-needed space for expansion. The rural, medical service, in the 
Pakur District, at "Theodori Mission," is now reaching people in 200 villages. 
There are many lepers in the district. Let the public health nurse relate the 
beginning of her effort to care for them: 



India 




Village W.S.C.S. women love their Third-grade rhythm band — playing 
"blessing box" (mite box). tabla, dholak, drums, cymbals. 










■»Jx >r ' - r 



Tree swing for two — one rides, the 

other pushes — Warne Baby Fold, Ba- 

reilly. 




Reading class drill for the fourth grade, Learning to make vegetable curry, on 
Louisa Soule Girls' School, Aligarh. typical stove, in a home economics class. 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 85 

It was hard to find a place for them because lepers are feared and shunned. 
We could not allow them to come to the dispensary, for then all the patients 
would refuse to come there. We tried to get a piece of land on which to build 
a hut, at least, to provide a roof for protection from sun and rain. But the 
Hindu landowner said he dared not allow this because "the wind could spread 
the disease over my land." But he finally allowed us to work under a tree. 
At first only a few came but soon 200 patients came eagerly. The tree is still 
the clinic. 

In Pakur itself a new dispensary and tuberculosis ward have been added to 
the little Christian hospital. At Ushagram money has been allowed for a girls' 
dormitory and for remodeling the teachers' residence. The young Indian evan- 
gelist, a Crusade Scholar, is giving dedicated service to the Asansol district. Her 
life is an inspiration in the villages. New schools, a new well, new encouragement 
result from her work. 

In the Bombay Conference the new hospital at Puntamba, with its Indian 
man doctor, who is also a surgeon, and woman missionary doctor and surgeon, is 
building up a splendid and ever-widening service. The two divisions of the Board 
of Missions have supplied splendid equipment and will continue to do so until the 
needs are met. A missionary public health nurse must soon be sent to assist in 
extension service to the villages. 

In the Delhi Conference the long-desired Batala Center is beginning to take 
shape. Land has been purchased and the first buildings are under construction. 
This will be the educational and spiritual center for a large village Christian popu- 
lation. Roorkee Middle and Primary Girls' School rejoices over the 1954 Week of 
Prayer allocation which affords a new dormitory and teachers' home. The School 
of Nursing has been completed at the Creighton-Freeman Hospital. Plans are 
under way for a good water system in the hospital. 

In Gujarat the School of Nursing at Nadiad is happy over the large number 
of students in training. A few new buildings have been added to Webb Memorial 
School, Baroda. 

In the Hyderabad Conference a new dormitory is being built at the Stanley 
Girls' High School. This school has been up-graded to the junior college level 
this year. Its special subject is home economics. Additional property, the final 
to be secured in the school's expansion program which began in 1946, was pur- 
chased during the year. 

Lucknow Conference is pleased that one of its oldest institutions, Kan-pur 
Methodist High School, received money for a new building. This will accommo- 
date elementary classes and give more space to the high school for its new science 
department. The hospital at Buxar is still crowded into the missionary doctor's 
home. Land and building must be our first consideration for the immediate future. 

A new project of the Madhya Pradesh Conference is a reading room and book- 
store, in an abandoned YWCA building, in Jabalpur. Evening after evening, 
the persons in charge have many interesting experiences as they meet spiritually 
hungry and eager young people. 

North India Conference finds that another high school for girls must be 
supplied, if more of our Christian girls are to be given an oportunity for a higher 
education. When government approval has been obtained, this new school will be 



86 Pakistan 

added to the Methodist Girls' School, Moradabad. Clara Swain Hospital continues 
its splendid expansion. A tuberculosis unit is needed. An addition to the nurses' 
home was built to give space for the increased number of nurses who must be 
trained to meet the needs of the hospital and to provide trained nurses for other 
hospitals. A well-equipped laundry was added this year. Money is available for 
more staff residences. 

In the South India Conference the first unit of the Holston Hospital, Yadgiri, 
was dedicated. It is rendering excellent service. At Kolar a new outpatient de- 
partment has been built at the Ellen T. Cowen Memorial Hospital. In Belgaum 
a fine second story of classrooms has been added to Vanita Vidyalaya High School. 
Both Baldwin Girls' High School and the Sherman School, at Belgaum, have been 
allowed funds to build classrooms and extend their boarding departments. 

This rapid review of new items is but a meager indication that the work of the 
Kingdom is never static. There is constant growth and expansion, never more so 
than today. "Behold, I make all things new" rings in the thoughts of one who is 
part of the upward surge of life in India today. 

Pakistan 

Nine years have passed since Pakistan, an independent nation, came into being. 
It was not until February 29, 1956, that her Constitution was ready for ratification 
and almost a month later, on March 23, Republic Day was celebrated. "Pakistan 
Zindabad" (Long live Pakistan!) shouted the joyous throng that day. The Presi- 
dent, General Iskander Mirza, injected a sober and challenging note in his address 
to the nation. He said: 

Independence is a supreme gift of God, but it is not a bed of roses. Inde- 
pendence demands an exacting price in the form of national responsibility 
and individual discipline. It is from our practice of justice, tolerance, patriot- 
ism, honesty, bravery, unity, faith and discipline that the world will judge us. 
Minorities were assured by the Prime Minister, Mr. Mohammed Ali, that: 

The non-Muslim in our midst will, in the development of their culture, in 
their rights as citizens, enjoy the same status as Muslims. Their lives, their 
liberty, their homes must be as secure as that of any Muslim. They are an 
integral part of the life of Pakistan and they must occupy an honored place 
in our body-politic. 
As a safeguard on religious instruction, the Constitution declares: 

(1) No person attending any educational institution shall be required to 
receive religious instruction, or take part in any religious ceremony, or attend 
religious worship, if such instruction, ceremony, or worship relates to a wor- 
ship other than his own. (2) No religious community or denomination shall 
be prevented from promoting religious instruction for pupils of that commu- 
nity or denomination in any educational institution maintained wholly by that 
community or denomination. (3) No citizen shall be denied admission to any 
educational institution receiving aid from public revenues on the grounds only 
of race, religious caste or place of birth. 

In the spirit of these freedoms the Christian Church has a great opportunity. 
We should send out more missionaries to strengthen the Church, for it still lacks 
the numbers of persons needed to enter fully into the present opportunities. 

We rejoice that three new missionaries have been sent by the Board of Mis- 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 



87 




Kathmandu, Nepal. The "palace on a Bhadgoan Village, Nepal, location of 
low hill in the valley," home of hospital largest outpost clinic. Two laboratory 
and staff of the United Mission. students under tree. 




Recess time, fun for all, Lucie Harrison School, Lahore. 




f^J ^f^trnfl % ^h^ 



Holston Hospital, Yadgiri, South India. Nadiad Hospital, India, students in 

training in the three-year-old School 
of Nursing. 



88 Nepal 

sions this year : Evelyn Weaver to the Lucie Harrison High School, Lahore ; Wynell 
Jordan to religious educational and youth activities, Brooks Memorial Church, 
Karachi; and Jean Bagnall, R.N., to the United Christian Hospital, Lahore. 

Miss Elsie Reik summarizes the general situation: 

Fresh evangelistic programs have resulted in surprising response. The 
house-to-house campaign of calling to give the Gospel of Matthew, undertaken 
by young people, has been very successful from the point of view of our own 
church. They were everywhere received cordially in their visits to 37,000 homes 
an the four cities where the campaign has already been undertaken. Three 
other cities will have a campaign later on. We hope twice as many homes will 
be visited. 

The church is giving attention to the providing of better educational oppor- 
tunities for village Christian children. According to available figures only 35 per 
cent of the children in Christian homes are in school. 

During the year 850 copies of the Urdu edition of the Upper Room were sold, 
mostly among the city church members. 

Kinnaird College for Women, Lahore, where three of our missionaries are 
teaching, has had a fine year. There was a ready response on the part of the 
students to the Christian atmosphere of the college. Lucie Harrison High School 
is so popular that a new dormitory and a new primary school must be built im- 
mediately to make room for the children whose parents insist on their admission. 
The United Christian Hospital faces a question for decision. Should it remain in 
inadequate space on the Forman Christian College compound, or should it locate 
somewhere else? The answer lies with the mission boards supporting the hospital, 
for either decision means money in rather large amounts. But the hospital is our 
only one, and it has given nine years of splendid service. It must be made adequate 
to meet its opportunity for a larger medical ministry. 

The Girls' High School in Karachi holds classes in rented buildings while land is 
being purchased and buildings built. A beautiful location has been found. The 
Anglican Holy Trinity Church most cooperatively granted permission for the pur- 
chase of part of its grounds in an ideal location. The village work throughout the 
conference goes forward under the supervision of persons carrying too heavy a 
program of work. Several evangelists should be added to the missionary staff. 

"To say the Christian work in Pakistan is very ripe is trite," writes Miss 
Constance Blackstock. "The opportunity has always been with us." It is more 
challenging than ever today. 

United Mission to Nepal 

The work in Nepal has been strengthened by the return of Dr. Robert and 
Dr. Bethel Fleming, and the coming of Dr. Edward and Dr. Elizabeth Miller, new 
medical missionaries. Another step forward has been the renting of a "palace" on 
the top of a low hill in the valley. Everyone is pleased with the new location and 
glad to be away from the old cholera hospital and its un-salubrious neighborhood. 
The new hospital provides space for an outpatient department, a small maternity 
block, an X-ray room, operating and anesthesia room, and a good laboratory. 
This laboratory was made possible by the personal, generous giving of our labora- 
tory technician, Mrs. Eunice Stephens. 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 89 

The United Medical Mission began in 1954. Miracles do happen! The open- 
ing of Nepal, with a welcome to Christian workers, is itself an amazing fact. The 
rapidity with which the work is growing is another. Already patients are numbered 
in the thousands at the village clinics and the humble hospitals in Kathmandu and 
Tansen. Dr. Esther Nallathamby, loaned from the Creighton-Freeman Hospital, 
at a time when there were no doctors in Kathmandu, attended the wife of a high 
government official during the birth of her baby. She established such a bond of 
friendship that the official has not hesitated to challenge the mission with calls to 
areas where there is no medical help and where schools are needed. Orthodox 
Hindus and Buddhists are a little dubious but not openly antagonistic. In these 
two years the name of the mission has been changed from "United Medical Mission" 
to "United Mission," to allow for the beginning of work other than medical. An 
experimental elementary school and a high school for girls have been started. The 
Mission to Lepers has been invited to become a part of the mission. The leaders 
of the United Mission to Nepal are thinking of welfare workers, business adminis- 
trators, nursing supervisors, teachers of pathology, radiography, pharmacy and 
public health, workers whom they hope will be enlisted from India and other 
countries. 

This little story comes from India, written by Miss Marjorie Dimmitt: 

To send an Indian missionary into Nepal is one of the goals of the Cen- 
tenary Fund, now being raised. When the cause was presented to a village 
church in Hyderabad Conference by Dr. Balaram, the villagers said, "But 
we have had drought for seven years and can scarcely feed ourselves. How 
can we give to send a missionary to Nepal?" 

"Could you give a goat?" Dr. Balaram asked, his eyes falling on one 
nibbling at a tuft of grass. Yes, they thought they might give a goat. The 
news spread, and now every one of the 179 village churches in that district 
has given a goat. Village churches in another district pledged 1,000 chickens. 
And so they learn that no Christian is too poor to give. 



Japan and Korea 

By Margaret Billingsley, Executive Secretary 
Japan 

The Spirit of Christ — for All of Life 

IT IS EXCITING to see the Spirit of Christ at work in individual lives, in groups, 
in communities, and in a nation. Even though the Christian church in Japan 
is a very small minority when counted in numbers, its strength and influence 
penetrate into the life of the nation. Ten years after the war, Japan, in many 
ways, has returned to the prewar state. Materially and physically, the scars of 
war have faded; the national government has reverted to some of its prewar con- 
ceptions in trying to recover power over the people but, at the same time, the 
church has grown in strength and unity. One missionary reports that probably no 
other year has been so expansive or has had as unusual a program of Christian 
evangelism as 1955-56. Looking toward 1959 when the 100th year of Christianity 
in Japan will be observed, the Centenary Evangelistic Program, now in its second 



90 Japan 

year, is progressing under the motto, "Forward With Christ." In realizing the 
purpose of this movement, three basic principles have been set: 

1. The program must be based upon the acknowledgment and acceptance 
of the responsibility for evangelism and reach throughout Japan. 

2. The program should be based upon the initiative of the local churches. 

3. The central missionary obligation not only on the part of the pastors, 
but on the part of the laymen, is fundamental to the program. 

Special emphasis has been placed on types of evangelism, one for each year: 
Primary Evangelism, Rural Evangelism, Occupational Evangelism, Visitation Evan- 
gelism, Youth Evangelism, and Women's Evangelism. 

As part of the 1956 emphasis the second annual National Youth Conference 
of the United Church was held at Aoyama Gakuin in Tokyo. In spite of rain, 
1,670 youth from all sections of the country, representing 1,500 churches, and from 
various occupational and cultural groups, including more than 100 from mining and 
textile factories as well as salaried workers, gathered under the slogan, "We Are 
Disciples of Christ," to discuss and plan for the advance of Christian evangelism. 
The youth are editing and publishing a monthly magazine named Christian Youth, 
which is read by the young people of the church. They also contributed funds to 
finance the Christian Youth Caravan to Okinawa. 

The women of the church are planning for the emphasis of 1957, which will 
be Women's Evangelism. Occupational Evangelism has received great emphasis 
during recent years. Special efforts have been made by Japanese leaders and mis- 
sionaries in the coal mining areas, among factory workers in the industrial areas, 
among railway workers, and in other areas of Japanese life. These are places 
where communism is strongest, but the Gospel is making its way into these largely 
neglected fields. 

A vital and growing interest in Visitation Evangelism as a method of work is 
demonstrated by the individual pastor and lay workers in the local church. Another 
phase is Literature Evangelism. Several periodicals: The Christian Weekly, with 
over 2,000 subscriptions, The New Life, Sunday School Teacher's Companion, 
Studies of the Bible, The Farmer's Companion, The Guide to Church Music and 
Worship, and Church Youth are all in circulation. Two of these have a circulation 
of approximately 10,000. Four years ago, there was no home missions budget, but 
today it is a 10,000,000-yen program. 

The church is also reaching out into new geographical areas by sending Christian 
workers with the Japanese immigrants who move to Brazil each year under a govern- 
ment program. 

This year has seen the publication of the New Japanese Hymnal and the new 
translation of the whole Bible in colloquial Japanese. It also marks the eightieth 
year of the Japan Bible Society. 

Education 

As Hiroshima Girls' School plans for its seventieth anniversary which is to be 
held in October, 1956, the report not only represents the increased spiritual emphasis 
within Hiroshima, but it is also an illustration of what is happening in all of the 
schools related to the church. Miss Hamako Hirose, president of this school, writes: 

Throughout the school year an effort has been made in each department 
to emphasize religious education as well as the academic side of education. 
Gradually, the number of Christian teachers is increasing, and the atmosphere 
of the entire school is becoming more spiritual. 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 



91 




Miss Hirai, a graduate of Seiwa Girls' School, 
teaching in a class at the Community Center. 



Dr. Hamako Hirose, a graduate and 
now president of our three schools 
of Hiroshima Jogakuin. One of the 
few Japanese Christian women 
with a Ph.D. in Education, she has 
real Christian vision for this school. 




Eager children come to Ai Kei 
Gakuen Kindergarten, Tokyo. 



Home Management is interesting to girls at 
Hiroshima Junior College. 



r ':V 








Margery L. Mayer with Kindergarten at 
Kagoshima. 



The conference for dormitory matrons 
in Japanese Christian schools included 
five Crusade Scholars. 



92 Japan 

Emphasis is put on extracurricular activities. The music program, both 
by the teachers and the student choirs, is serving well within and outside the 
school. The college choir made a successful tour in March, holding meetings 
in several cities and helping churches with music programs. Members of the 
high-school Christian group are sharing in community projects and in visiting 
prisoners with the Bible message. Some of the prisoners are beginning to believe 
in Jesus Christ. Early morning chimes played by a Hiroshima missionary 
teacher are comforting these hungry souls in the neighboring prisons. Some of 
the Christian students of the college continue to help prisoners after their 
release. The College Students' Association is sponsoring a student from Okinawa, 
paying all school expenses throughout her four years of college work at 
Hiroshima. 

This year being the seventieth year of the founding of the school, we 
are making an appeal to all the parents, graduates, and friends to give offerings 
to build a library for the high school. It is not an easy matter to raise several 
million yen among the Japanese. However, everybody who loves the school 
is willing to give something, even if it is a small amount. The new gymnasium 
is a most distinguished gift from those Christian friends in America who so lov- 
ingly have kept on helping Jogakuin throughout the past seventy years. The 
fund raised at the big school bazaar last November will be used to pay for a 
bronze bust of Miss Nannie B. Gaines. It is now being made by the husband of 
one of our graduates, a sculptor in Tokyo. It will be unveiled at the seventieth 
anniversary. 

Seiai Jo Gakko in Hirosaki reached its seventieth anniversary on June 26, 1956. 
This school in the northern part of Japan has an enrollment of over 1,200 girls. 

On the retirement of Mr. Kiyoshi Otake after eighteen years as principal 
of Seibi Gakuen in Yokohama, a fine woman graduate of the school, Dr. Asa 
Yumoto, was chosen to be principal. Under her leadership the school is taking on 
new life. However, the day Dr. Yumoto began her new duties a fire destroyed the 
gymnasium, bookstore, and junior high school building. During the year a new 
senior high school classroom building had been completed with funds from the 
Woman's Division, and before the spring of 1957 it is expected that a new gymnasium 
and classroom building will replace those destroyed by fire. Funds designated for 
expansion, with extra gifts from the Woman's Division and some local gifts in 
Japan, have made this possible. The development program and replacement of the 
condemned main building will have to be postponed until more funds can be secured. 

The Education Association of Christian Schools in Japan gives the following 
report on church-related schools: 

1. United Church of Christ Related Schools „ ., _, , , 

Faculty Students 

4 Post Graduate Schools 913 

12 Universities 1,689 32,756 

21 Junior Colleges 

(includes Japan Biblical Seminary) 1,012 7,807 

49 Senior High Schools 1,366 27,603 

4 Special Graduate Departments 16 127 

46 Junior High Schools 997 21,494 

5 Primary Schools 88 2,341 

1 Oral School for the Deaf 20 138 

5,188 93,179 



2,112 


1,068 
40,603 


1,419 


11,092 


1,995 
1,438 

187 


40,474 

30,038 

4,160 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 93 

2. Total Figures Including All Protestant 
Denominations 

5 Post Graduate Schools 

16 Universities 

32 Junior Colleges 

(includes 2 Seminaries) 

73 Senior High Schools 

(includes 4 night schools) 

66 Junior High Schools 

11 Primary Schools 

7,151 127,435 

What a wonderful opportunity awaits the Christian missionary where the 
spirit of Jesus Christ for all of life can be brought to so many students and 
faculty members! 

In the spring of 1957 the first graduation at the International Christian Univer- 
sity of Japan will take place. There are now 664 students enrolled — 36.7 per cent 
are women. Ten per cent of the students are from abroad, representing Korea, 
Hong Kong, Formosa, Indonesia, Thailand, Canada, and the United States. A 
Japanese member of the board writes about the university: 

I want to bring to your special attention a very, very important aspect. 
It is the word Christian in our institution's name which I want to bring to 
your attention. We have been challenging students with the Christian way of 
life, and we are today reaping the fruits of this witness. We are observing 
today on the campus something I have never seen elsewhere — the students 
themselves are initiating programs. The Bible classes on the campus, where 
the students select their own leaders from among the faculty, are amazing. 
We find students organizing retreats on their own initiative and selecting the 
leaders who address them. This is a remarkable development. And then the 
students have organized independent caravans during the summer vacations 
to visit and help isolated churches in Hokkaido, the northern island of Japan. 

Social Service Institutions 

Among the 49 social service institutions which are related to the United Church, 
the Methodists are outstanding in their contribution. Ai Kei Gakuin is the oldest 
of these institutions as well as one of the largest and best known. These are a few 
of the evidences of the spirit of Christ at work for all of life in Japan. God is 
calling us to do much more. In order to do our missionary task we need a new 
outpouring of the spirit of Christ on the church in America and especially on our 
young people, so that they may hear the call to witness to the world's people. 

Centers in Nagasaki, Osaka, Yokosuka, and Fukuoka are continuing their 
valuable contributions in group work, clinics, and guidance. The re-established work 
in Hiroshima is progressing nicely with plans to begin the new building in the near 
future. 

Korea 

An Ancient People, a New Republic 

According to the Korean calendar this is the year 4289, not 1956. On a 
peninsula about the size of the state of Minnesota, and almost the same shape 
slightly elongated, lives a homogenous race distinct from their Chinese and Japanese 



94 



Korea 




Representatives of Korean Meth- 
odism at Interfield Consultation, 
April, 1956. 



Dr. Barbara Moss at entrance to Inchon 
Methodist Hospital. 




Four retired Korean workers (seated) and 
members of the Board of Directors for the 
Rest Home for retired Christian workers. 



A new building beside the old at 
Yong Wha Girls' School, dedicated 
December 30, 1955. 




These Ewha High School girls received 
baptism in February, before their gradu- 
ation. 



Mrs. J. Wesley Masland, Miss Henrietta 
Gibson, and Mrs. S. McCreless visited 
Ewha University for the Seventieth An- 
niversary. Dr. Helen Kim, president, is 
on the left. 






Department of Work in Foreign Fields 95 

neighbors. They have Oriental characteristics, of course, but also many Occidental 
ones. They are considered to be descendants from two strains, the nomadic tribes 
of Mongolia and the Caucasian people of western Asia. Strong and vigorous in 
body, patient and courageous in spirit, they have survived civil strife and foreign 
invasion. The Koreans have a distinct sense of beauty in form and movement, and 
are fond of music, both western and native. 

Only seventy-two years ago the first Methodist missionaries entered Korea to 
share the Christian message. They found a people deeply religious, worshiping the 
powers of nature as in primitive animism, yet believing in the Great One, Hananim. 
Both Confucian moral teachings and Buddhic rites had left traces in Korean culture, 
but the people were open to the new teaching and religious experience. As individuals 
became Christians, churches, schools and hospitals were established to minister 
to the spiritual, intellectual, and physical needs. Other church groups, primarily 
Presbyterian and Catholic, have worked in Korea during these decades. Since the 
truce, various denominations and agencies have undertaken projects. 

Now about 8 per cent of the people are professing Christians, while many more 
respect the teachings and work of the church and weekday opportunities to study 
in Christian institutions. 

A Line Still Divides 

The line, which was drawn at the close of World War II as a temporary 
demarcation, has continued as an ominous division of a people fervently desiring 
to be one. Only 44 per cent of Korea's pre-1945 territory is south of the line, with 
two-thirds of the population living there, 600 to a square mile, while 56 per cent 
of the land and practically all of the mineral and industrial potentials are north of 
the line. Claims are made in the West that the war in Korea has been stopped, 
but armies patrol both sides, and the "peace" is insecure. The national economy is 
drained to support an army indefinitely. Families are divided, knowing no more 
about members on the other side of the line than people in this country know about 
people on another planet. The cry of the people — the prayer of the people — is, 
"To be one." 

In August, 1952, the Republic of Korea was born, and in May, 1956, the people 
re-elected President Rhee by direct vote. That 86 per cent of the eligible voters 
exercised their right to cast a ballot is evidence of a growing understanding of 
democratic government and citizen responsibility. However, the governed and those 
governing still have much to learn in order to perfect an honest and fair government 
of the people and for the people. 

Chief among Korea's problems are the social evils which follow war, the inflation 
which accompanies a foreign-subsidized economy, and the insecurity which prevails 
as long as armed men guard a line. Resolute and patient the people live on, deter- 
mined but knowing not where hope lies. 

Another Year in the Churches 

During this third year since the truce almost all the postwar rebuilding of 
churches has been completed. Bishop Lew has issued a call to the churches to give 
more prayerful attention to the spiritual and teaching ministry, to the winning of 
unreached individuals or groups. Preachers have been assigned to the reclaimed 
area near the patrol line, and pioneer evangelistic and medical teams have gone to 
assist and encourage the people who are trying to build homes and restore farms in 
the old battle-scarred areas. Mrs. Euline S. Weems has been a tireless visitor and 



96 Korea 

preacher among these pioneer people in a district where she once resided as an 
evangelistic worker. She has encouraged groups of students and social workers to 
minister to material and educational needs through plowing, providing for wells 
and irrigation, visiting, or teaching. 

Anniversary 

This year is the seventieth anniversary of the founding of Ewha Girls' School. 
The queen of Korea gave the name Ewha, meaning Pear Blossom, symbol of purity 
and of royalty, to this first school for girls in Korea. Beginning with four girls 
under Mrs. Mary Fitch Scranton, the first principal, the school has grown and 
become two institutions, Ewha High School of three thousand girls under Mr. Pong 
Cho Shin, and Ewha University of four thousand students under Dr. Helen Kim. 

Honor guests at the anniversary celebration were Miss Marie Church, a retired 
missionary who was formerly principal of the high school; Miss Henrietta Gibson, 
chairman of Ewha Cooperative Board, who recently retired as treasurer of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service; Mrs. J. Wesley Masland, treasurer of the 
former Woman's Foreign Missionary Society under which Mrs. Scranton and other 
early missionaries received their appointments, and now treasurer of the Ewha 
Cooperative Board; and Mrs. S. E. McCreless, a member of the Ewha Board. 

A new auditorium, with a seating capacity of four thousand, was dedicated as 
a part of the anniversary ceremonies. 

These Little Ones 

The care of the widows and orphans left in the wake of war has been a part 
of the concern of those whose Master said, "It is not the will of my Father that 
one of these little ones should perish." 

Through the social service department of the Korean Methodist Church a share 
of the task of relief for Korea's 100,000 war orphans and 284,000 widows has been 
undertaken, while the Korean government, United Nations agencies, and other 
philanthropic and religious organizations also do their part. 

Mrs. Anna B. Chaffin and Miss Marion B. Shaw were loaned to the work of 
the Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief to help in the social service work 
of the Korean Methodist Church. Mrs. Chaffin directed the building of widows' 
home units and work projects, a farm folk school, self-supporting projects for orphan- 
ages, and a rest home for retired Christian women workers. Miss Shaw is giving 
attention to the physical and psychological social care of the children in the forty 
orphanages for which the Korean Methodist Church has responsibility. 

In the Baby Fold at Taejon and the one at Kongju missionaries supervise 
the care of other children, while their mothers receive needed medical care, or are 
employed, or until the children can be placed in foster homes. 

New Workers 

The daughter of an energetic rural preacher, Chung Ok Yun, who was granted 
a period of study at Scarritt College as a Crusade Scholar, has returned to Korea 
and is working earnestly in the Department of Christian Education. She is developing 
teaching materials and training teachers for the many crowded Sunday schools. 

Edith Simester, a former missionary in China and Brazil, has begun work with 
the Literacy Movement. 

Chasteen Shine is helping in the office work at the Methodist Headquarters and 
doing secretarial work for Bishop Lew. She is also finding teaching opportunities in 
her Korean church. 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 97 

Ruth Stewart and Vivian Gledhill, who have been devoting their major attention 
to language study, have also learned much about Korean social and physical needs. 
Miss Gledhill writes: 

From my window can be seen refugee housing conditions such as many 
of you can hardly imagine, but beyond the refugee houses in the distance can 
be seen a mountain, majestic and beautiful. Either view alone is not enough. 
When we see only the need we easily get discouraged, and to see only the 
beauty is not realistic; it is not only as we see the destruction and need, but 
also beyond it the beauty and hope that God intended, that we can see the 
possibility of something better. 

Retiring Workers 

Mrs. Anna B. Chaffin, after forty-three years of service for Korea; and Miss 
Mollie Townsend, after four years in Korea and thirty-one years in China and 
Japan, have returned to their homeland for medical care and retirement. 

Citation of Appreciation 

The Minister of Justice of the Republic of Korea gave Miss Bessie Oliver a 
citation in appreciation of her devoted ministry to the women prisoners in the 
national prison at Taejon. A part of Miss Oliver's work has been weekly visits to 
the prison, where the women wardens welcomed her, to lead a religious service and 
teach a Bible class of more than forty women prisoners (mostly political prisoners 
accused of Communist collaboration) seated on mats on the ground in a small court- 
yard. Impressive Christmas and Easter decorations and services marked the festi- 
vals, some conversions and baptisms were reported, and when prisoners were paroled 
they were helped to find friends and employment. 

The Minister of Justice showed his understanding of the Christian motive, 
when in informal conversation after the citation he said, "They (the prisoners) are 
our brothers and sisters." 

A«»if Buildings 

A six-classroom brick building for Yong Wha Junior High School at Inchon 
was dedicated on December 30, 1955. It was made possible by a grant of materials 
from the Armed Forces Assistance to Korea and funds for labor costs from the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service. In like manner a chapel built of native 
stone has been erected on the campus of Yang Chung High School at Inchon, the 
only high school for girls in an extensive rice-farming district. Students from this 
school teach Sunday-school classes in village after village, and over one hundred 
of them are teachers in vacation Bible schools. 

At Taejon the Kindergarten Teacher Training School, directed by Clara Howard, 
has taken form in three well-built buildings on the terraced hillside overlooking 
the city, which is becoming the "Seoul" of the southern part of the republic. Land 
has been purchased near the campus for the building for Holston School so that 
it may be moved from the borrowed factory site. 

Healing Them 

Would that all the victims of T.B. in Korea might be brought to Jesus that 
he might put his hands on every one of them and heal them.. At Inchon Methodist 
Hospital many are being healed in body and spirit. Dr. Barbara Moss writes: 



98 Korea 

Only in terms of the lives of these patients is it possible to evaluate the 
events of the past year. We have built no buildings, we have not expanded, 
but we have matured and grown in ways which are intangible and cannot be 
put into words. 

The Mobile Clinic has taken on greater importance this year not only as we 
have been seeing patients but also as we have been participating in the Wednes- 
day evening worship services at the country churches we visit. Whenever 
possible we are combining our services with those of the audio-visual evange- 
listic workers who show movies of the life of Christ and endeavor to bring 
nonbelievers into the new life, thereby strengthening the church. 

Dr. Moss has been teaching a course in psychology for the nurses' training school 
at the Inchon Farm School. 

At Severance Hospital, Thelma Maw is at work in the physio-therapy depart- 
ment. Adults and children who have lost the use of limbs through polio or other 
disease, or who have had amputations, are treated and trained to be useful, self- 
reliant citizens again. Marian Kingsley at Kangneung is doing public health work and 
teaching hygiene and preventive medicine among the rural people of the east coast. 

Ever the Youth 

In summer youth conferences, in Bible classes, at the churches, at Tai Wha 
Community Center, or other social service centers at Pusan, Inchon, or Taejon, 
young people from government schools or from offices learn about the Christian mes- 
sage and make personal decisions. In the six girls' schools related to The Methodist 
Church, where there are more than six thousand girls, and in Ewha University, 
there are many who openly confess their faith in Christ and receive baptism. Since 
so many young people from the northern part of Korea took refuge in the south, 
the school population is more than double in proportion to the adult population, and 
schools, both government and private, are overcrowded. The importance of Christian 
teachers and missionary helpers in the schools cannot be overemphasized. 

Beyond the Line That Divides 

No Korean can forget the blacked-out part of his fatherland. No one can go 
there, no letters can be sent, but prayers can be offered, and sound waves can 
carry messages. Through the Christian Broadcast Station HLKY under the auspices 
of the National Christian Council, programs of worship, Bible study, music, and 
health instruction are beamed to the north for those who have ears to hear. Young 
people are being challenged and trained to be ready when it may become possible 
for pioneering Christians to go into a redeemed North Korea. 

We Must Work 

Korea's strength is the strength of brave, patient men and women who suffer 
for their convictions; Korea's weakness is the weakness of character of many in 
public office or private business who seek advantage at the cost of dishonest or 
shady dealings. The endurance of Korea as a democracy will depend upon the 
conviction and moral uprightness of her citizens. Jesus would say to them, "Ye 
shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free," and in the spirit of Jesus 
all Christians must say, "We must work the works of Him who sent me, while it 
is day;" (John 9:4, E.S.V.). 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 99 

Latin America 

By Marian Derby, Executive Secretary 

""^E7"0U must be a missionary, too; if you are a Christian you must." This was 
■[_ the answer of 130 Methodist leaders from all parts of the world as they met 
last April at Epworth-by-the-Sea, in Georgia, to consult on the status of 
missions in 1956. This answer was given in the deep conviction that the era of 
missionary work is not past, but that it must be given even greater emphasis in the 
future. Part of the complete answer coming from the conference reads, "The 
time will never come when there will not be a need for the international exchange 
of Christian workers. The mission of the church on a world basis can best be met 
by interracial international teams of workers." * 

From the earliest days of the missionary movement, dedicated national leaders 
have fared forth on the missionary task side by side with those sent from other 
lands. Many have been true pioneers, sacrificing position, wealth, and comfort as 
they have answered the call to take the gospel of Christ to all people and the spirit 
of Christ into all of life. We see them today responding to the needs not only of 
those in their own communities, but reaching out across the barriers of country, 
race, and language. They must be missionaries, too; if they are Christians, they 
must. 

It is of the evidences of this missionary outreach on the part of Methodists 
in the Latin American countries, especially as it pertains to work related to the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service, that I wish to report. For the most part, 
the report covers activities of the present 
year, though, of course, many are a con- 
tinuation of projects begun in previous 
years. 

Students Are Missionaries 

Like these girls in Colegio Maria 
Alvarado in Lima, Peru, students in our 
schools look-out on many areas where there 
is a need for "missionaries" to take the 
Christian gospel and the spirit of Christ 
for all of life. These girls find special 
opportunities for this in the La Florida 
Social Center where they help conduct 
recreational hours for the children and 
young people; tell stories for the small G,rls ,n S^o? Alvarado 

children during the story-telling hour; do 

supervisory work in the library; and help in other ways. Others regularly teach 
Sunday-school classes in some of the smaller churches in the needy suburbs. 

From Colegio Isabela Hendrix in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, comes the report of 
student and teacher participation in the mission work of the church through prayer. 
The Brazilian Methodist Church has worked out a plan to observe a chain of con- 

iFrom message issued by Interfield Consultation of the Board of Missions at Epworth-by-the-Sea. 
bt. Simon's Island, Georgia, April 4 to 15, 1956. 




100 



Latin America 



tinuous prayer this year. The Isabela Hendrix day was scheduled from 6 a.m. August 
15 until 6 a.m. the following morning. The special day of prayer was explained to 
all of the students and faculty, and group and individual invitations were issued. 
The pastor, faculty members, former students, and especially invited guests helped 
with the program throughout the day. At the early morning hour, there were 
lighted candles on the altar, and the picture of Durer's "Praying Hands." Later 
the candles were replaced with a big basket of lilies. Both day and boarding 
students worshiped and prayed throughout the day. Some Sunday-school classes 
came at previously indicated hours, and one high-school class came at a set hour. 
A teacher invited the servants and directed the meditation during one hour. 

At the evening vesper hour, all dormitory students were present, and from 
the chapel the prayer chain was continued in the dining room with music and 
reading from the Bible. For the night hours they gathered around the fireplace 
in the dormitory parlor. Some of the students came in to join the circle. The 
smallest girls stayed until about 9 p.m., then went to their rooms. The older girls 
stayed until eleven or twelve. One of the high-school seniors and her aunt came 
about midnight and stayed until morning. All those who participated in the 
prayer circle will long remember this event in their school life and it is hoped that 
because of it they will be a stronger force in the Protestant life of the city and in 
the Methodist Church in Brazil. 

Colegio Americano in southern Brazil reports several facts which have made 
them especially happy. Usually the girls wish to join the church in their home towns, 
but this year four of the students decided to make their profession of faith in the 
chapel of the school. This, of course, had its effect on other students. One of the 
first two deaconesses in the Methodist Church of Brazil who were consecrated in 

July, 1955, is a graduate of Colegio Ameri- 
cano. In November, the first young woman 
to go out from a Methodist church in 
Brazil as a foreign missionary, also a gradu- 
ate of Colegio Americano, was commissioned 
for work in Peru. It was while she was in 
high school that she joined the Methodist 
Church and wrote in her English book at 
the close of the year, "I want to be a mis- 
sionary." 




In Colegio Eliza Bowman in Cuba, the 
teachers, students, and former students take 
an active part in all phases of the church 
work. One of their big contributions is in 
helping with the interpreting when min- 
isters from the United States come each 
February to help the churches in evange- 
listic campaigns. This experience is a great 
blessing to both teachers and students. 
This summer several students are working 
in camps, assemblies, caravans, and work 
camps in different parts of the island. As 
Miss Mary Woodward, the principal of 
the school, says, "We are proud of the 46 students who are graduating this year, 



Consecration of deaconesses. 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 



101 




A class in Colegio Eliza Bowman. 



and that the Christian training at Eliza Bowman has helped to prepare them 
for the road ahead." 

In Crandon Institute in Montevideo, Uruguay, a new missionary interest was 

engendered when a group of 
students and teachers visited 
Bolivia during their summer va- 
cation in January, 1956. They 
were especially interested in see- 
ing the small school for Indian 
girls which had been started two 
years previously on the Altiplano 
on the shores of Lake Titicaca. 
During previous years they had 
given money to this project, and 
now several students had indi- 
cated a desire to give a year or 
two of their lives as well, so they 
were interested in firsthand in- 
formation. The results of the 
visit are already evident in the 
giving of about $350 toward the 

purchase of a jeep for the school. The giving of the money became a project of 

the student council and much enthusiasm and interest in the work were created. 

A small group is continuing its preparation in the hope that its members may go 

in person to help in the work. 

Even the smallest children are often stimulated to missionary activity by 
stories of those in need. This is the case of the kindergarten children in Bennett 
College in Rio de Janeiro. They heard of children in a school that was being 
started in one of the small rural churches who did not have enough chairs to sit on. 
They immediately brought their 
pennies to help provide chairs. 
Then they interested their par- 
ents in doing other things for 
the children. 

The Lena Knapp Home for 
Girls in Rosario Tala in Argen- 
tina provides a real home for 
Protestant girls coming from the 
small towns in the rural areas 
around the city, but it does much 
more than this. Through its in- 
fluence, the girls carry back into 
their homes a new understanding 
of the Protestant faith. Through 
its Bible classes and service proj- 
ects other young people in the 
town are given training. All this 
is possible because the Argentine deaconess is a real missionary in spirit and dedi- 
cation. 




Kindergarten Children at Bennett College. 



102 



Latin America 




Students from a student hostel in Argentina. 



In February, 1956, property was purchased in the city of Concordia, in eastern 
Argentina, for the establishment of a similar home. In Concordia there is a normal 

school as well as a high school 
and good primary schools which 
girls can attend. 

The hostels for primary and 
secondary students in connection 
with the schools in Mexico also 
have a real missionary outreach. 
Girls coming from non-Christian 
backgrounds go back into their 
homes taking with them the joy 
that comes with changed lives. 
Predeaconess clubs help those 
committed to full-time Christian 
service to be faithful to their 
calling and are also an inspira- 
tion to other students. The nor- 
mal school in Puebla was espe- 
cially proud of the eight girls 
graduating this year, for many 
of them will be teaching in our 
Protestant schools throughout the Republic where they will have many "mis- 
sionary" opportunities. 

The hostel for university students in connection with the University Center 
and the University Church in Havana has increased the effectiveness of this center. 
Small prayer rooms on 
each floor, family devo- 
tions in the dining room, 
and more formal religious 
meetings held in the so- 
cial hall, all make it evi- 
dent to even the most 
casual onlooker that this 
is, indeed, a hostel for 
Christian students. But 
the emphasis is not only 
on the nurture of the 
spiritual life of the stu- 
dents themselves. They 
know that real growth can 
only come as they share 
with others. This is done 
not only through the 
daily witness of Christian 
living in the classroom 
and other phases of university life, but also through special projects. A group of 
students worked in a little mission, visiting many of the homes, leaving a booklet 
on the Sermon on the Mount, and inviting people to come to church. Such activi- 
ties build mission-minded lay leaders for the church in future years. 




n Havana. 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 103 

A very real mission field is found among the Indians in the jungles of eastern 
Peru. One of our missionaries reports: 

One of the highlights of the evening programs of the annual conference 
was mission night, when reports were made on the work at Satipo, our national 
missionary project. A Campa Indian, delegate to the conference, wore his 
native dress and participated. At the bishop's call, five young people volun- 
teered to go into missionary work as replacements, in a sense, for the five 
missionaries who were killed recently in Ecuador. Seeing the missionary enter- 
prise blossom here in Peru gave me the same kind of feeling that many a 
Woman's Society member must have as she sees young people at home going 
forth. 

In March, 1956, property was purchased for a new hostel for university stu- 
dents in Lima, Peru. This is a joint project of the Division of World Missions 
and the Woman's Division of Christian Service, and it will fill a real need in pro- 
viding a home for Protestant university students. It is also hoped that, through 
it, other student activities may be developed which will provide opportunities for 
spiritual growth, not only for those living in the home but for other Protestant 
students in the city. 

In the special school for training full-time Christian workers, one would expect 
to find more of a missionary interest. This interest is not limited, however, to the 
preparation of girls for "missionary" service in future years. It offers opportunity 
for immediate service. In the Methodist Institute in Santo Amaro in Brazil, at a 
special service held in the church the first Sunday of the school year, each of the 
girls receives her appointment for the year. Then the pastor, or a representative, 
of the church where she is to serve kneels with her at the altar for Communion 
and dedication before the assignment is undertaken. These girls also receive 
special assignments for the month of July, a vacation month in Brazil, and for 
the three months of December, January and February, which are the summer 
months. These assignments present real missionary opportunity. 

Carolina was assigned to a village without a church. She set up benches 
outside the house of a Protestant family and went out to make her visits. Seventy- 
eight children came to her school. Then Carolina invited their mothers to join 
them in a picnic and more than a hundred gathered. When she left the town to 
return to school, the Protestant families who had been planning a church were 
beginning work on the building with new enthusiasm. 

Miss Gertrude Arbogast, of the Deaconess Training School in Mexico City, 
writes that "transformed lives and the inner dynamic of the Holy Spirit are the 
witness of the students that is bearing fruit for the school and His glory." Evidence 
of this was shown when one of the girls who was being interviewed as a possible 
future student in the school asked, "Do you think God could do for my life what 
he has done, and I have seen, in Celia's life?" 

In Buenos Aires, Argentina, two girls from the Union Theological Seminary 
are helping in a social work center in one of the poorer suburbs on the outskirts 
of the city. Three years ago a church was organized among these people by a 
layman. Much medicine, food, and clothing is being distributed among the hun- 
dreds of children and their mothers who live in miserable conditions. Others also 
help with work among the children and young people in the various churches of 
the city. 



104 



Latin America 




Miss Leora Shanks visi 
rural Brazil 



homes in 



Rural Areas Present Mission Opportunities 

The work in rural areas often seems to have a much greater missionary appeal 
than that in the city. Certainly the needs are great in this area in all parts 

of the Latin American countries. 

From the Rural Institute in Itapina, 
Brazil, comes the report of one of the first 
girls to graduate from the school. She will 
be a real missionary, though a public school 
teacher. She is planning to go to an area 
where the Methodist church is the only 
evangelical church with a strong and active 
congregation, but where there is not a 
single person who knows more than how 
to read and write his own name. 

At the Agricultural School in Preston, 
in Cuba, the religious life of the students 
has been enriched and strengthened through 
the new chapel which was completed and 
dedicated in recent months. When the 
tenth anniversary of the founding of the 
school was celebrated a study was made 
of the forty-one graduates and what they are doing. It was found that two are 
working in rural churches, six are studying for the ministry, four are teaching in 
small rural schools, twelve are working as pastors' assistants in rural areas. With 
the exception of four, all of the others are working in the church as assistants or 
volunteers. Including this group, plus former students who did not graduate but 
who are working for the church, and the present students, it is estimated that 
more than 2,000 people are being reached each Sunday. 

In Santa Rosa, Cuba, the school which was started last year on faith because 
there seemed to be such a great need for it has as its teacher a real "missionary" — an 
attractive young normal school graduate with a charming personality and a warm 
Christian experience. Converted three years ago, she has won three of her sisters 
and made a deep impression on higher cultural groups in the city of Matanzas 
where she lives. She has constantly surprised the folks in Santa Rosa with her 
cooperative spirit in helping beyond what was required of her as a teacher. She 
teaches three night classes in the school and often has to walk through deep mud 
or ride a horse for transportation from the train. She has inspired many by her 
simple and clear testimony as an exhorter and her zeal to tell others of her Christ. 
Miss Mamie Baird from Cortazar, Mexico, has written of a two-weeks' visit 
that she made to a small village back in the mountains with her "missionary" co- 
worker. They conducted a two-weeks' school for children from the ages of five to 
fifteen and also held meetings with the women. The children were greatly handi- 
capped in this group because none of them could read fluently. The oldest girl 
present and two of her cousins could spell out a few words. By the time the school 
had finished, however, they had made good progress. The children did better 
in writing than in reading, but it is hoped that when it is possible for Miss Baird 
and her co-worker to return, the children will be able to begin where they left off 
and in due time will learn to read. The homes of the evangelical people in this 
village have been proscribed by the local priest; consequently few people visit them. 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 



105 




In spite of this, a good group attended the final program of the school. Thus 

the first barrier was 

broken, and the seed 

sown in a simple program 

which may bear fruit in 

the future. 

At El Vergel, in 
southern Chile, at the 
Vocational School for 
Girls, an attempt is made 
to bring the spirit of 
Christ into all of life, es- 
pecially through classes 
in weaving and dressmak- 
ing. Two consecrated 
Protestant young women 
help in the teaching of 
these courses as well as 
some of the more aca- 
demic and cultural courses Girls Weavin g« 
which go to make up the 

curriculum. In daily contact with the girls, there is evidence of the constant 
witness of their Christian lives. 

A bit farther to the south in Chile is Francisca Cariqueo, the Matuche Indian 
nurse who serves her own people as a missionary of the Latin American Con- 
federation of Methodist Women. 

In Saltillo, Mexico, where the building for the Roberts Social Center has been 
almost entirely reconstructed, a new program of activity is under way. English 

classes have attracted one hundred young 
people who are interested in learning Eng- 
lish in the kind of atmosphere that is 
provided by the center. Plans for the fu- 
ture include a kindergarten; club work for 
both boys and girls; and a large playground 
for various sports, including facilities for 
basketball, volleyball, and dressing rooms. 
The remodeled building also has enlarged 
dormitory facilities. Last year there were 
seven Protestant girls living in the center 
while they attended various schools. One 
of these girls, who has been a living witness 
to her evangelical faith among her com- 
panions both at home and in school, has 
now completed her secondary studies and 
will be entering the deaconess training 
school in preparation for full-time Christian work. 

The Social Center in Monterrey has a fine staff of Mexican "missionaries" 
who help to carry on the multiple activities of such a center. They also have a 
very fine relationship with the Methodist churches in the city, but more than that, 




A missionary nurse gives an injec- 
tion. 



106 Latin America 

serve as "missionaries" in the public schools where they are privileged to have 
story hours with the children each week. 

The People's Central Institute in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, has had an oppor- 
tunity this year to give witness to the Christian gospel through two unique experi- 
ences of international fellowship. The first was in helping to orientate 55 North 
Korean boys who came to make their permanent home in Brazil after having 
spent two years in an army camp in India. The Institute arranged to take 20 
of the boys to its Camp Clay for a period of three months. Here they spent half 
their time studying Portuguese and the other half working toward the improvement 
of the camp. The Institute also helped them to find employment following these 
three months of orientation. 

In July the second international student work camp for the Institute was held. 
Thirty students from six different countries: the United States, Bolivia, Peru, 
Uruguay, Korea and Brazil — participated in the promotion of international good 
will while they lived at the People's Central Institute and worked with the residents 
of the slum area on the hill behind the Institute. Since there is no sewer system, 
and garbage is merely thrown out on the hillside, these students helped construct 
an incinerator. They also helped build a path from the street to the top of the 
hill where the people live. At the same time, the residents of the slum participated 
in a clean-up, paint-up, and improved sanitation campaign — true missionary work 
as the spirit of Christ is taken into all of life. 

The Woman's Division Enters New Areas 

Bolivia. In September, 1955, the Woman's Division of Christian Service 
accepted the invitation from the Methodist Church in Bolivia to help them face 
the tremendous opportunities presented in that country today. On January 28, 
1956, Miss Virginia Bunn, the first Woman's Division missionary to Bolivia, arrived 
in La Paz. Almost immediately she went out to Ancoraimes on the shores of Lake 
Titicaca where she is sharing responsibility for the small school for girls with Rosita 
Shihrilian, an Argentine missionary supported by the Latin American Confederation 
of Methodist Women. In March she wrote: 

Bolivia's greatest need is spiritual. In a very real sense Christ is the only 
answer. As to what this means in practical terms, one cannot be too dogmatic. 
But it is certain that at the present time, more dedicated Christian personnel 
is of primary concern. There are communities here begging for instruction in 
the Christian faith, for schools and teachers, for assistance in better agricultural 
methods, and for workers. The list of seemingly endless opportunities for service 
grows every day. 

I am very happy that the Woman's Division has seen fit to venture into 
this new field. And I am also happy that our first undertaking was in coopera- 
tion with a project of the Latin American Confederation of Methodist Women. 
As has been the case with the women of so many countries, the Bolivian Indian 
woman has had little or no status. This is apparent as one encounters a spirit 
of lethargy among the students of the Girls' School, who have in a great measure 
accepted the general opinion that women cannot learn. One can tell a differ- 
ence in the attitude of the students who attended school last year and the ones 
who are beginning now. This change in attitude spurs us on to greater efforts 
at making our educational program as interesting and practical as possible. 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 



107 



Nueva Imperial, Chile. For several years it has been hoped that we might be 
able to help with the work among the Mapuche Indians in southern Chile. In 
September, 1955, a short-term missionary with previous experience in home eco- 
nomics extension work was sent to share in this work with a missionary couple of 
the Division of World Missions and five Chilean "missionaries." Teaching a course 
in home economics and taking responsibility for planning meals for the small rural 
boarding school; planning for garden clubs and nutrition classes in the one-room 
rural schools in the area; and playing the accordian for several services in the 
church school each week and also for services held in the jail, make life anything 
but monotonous and are real missionary opportunities. 

Orphanages in Brazil. In several Latin American countries The Methodist 
Church has undertaken to establish homes to care for orphaned children or those 
who have no homes. They have been staffed by deaconesses and other national 
workers and supported by the local churches. This year, because of special condi- 
tions, Woman's Division missionaries have been appointed to two of these orphanages 
in Brazil — one more example of working together with "missionaries" of other lands. 

Noteworthy Dates and Events in 1956 

January — first Woman's Division missionary arrived in Bolivia 

February — building started for girls' dormitory at Piracicabano, Piracicaba, Brazil 
March — property for girls' hostel in Concordia, Argentina, purchased 
March — new primary building at Piracicabano opened 

April — property purchased for university student hostel in Lima, Peru (joint project 
of Woman's Division of Christian Service and Division of World Missions) 
May — 75th anniversary of Instituto Normal Mexico in Pueblo 
July — dedication of new classroom building at Rosario, Argentina 
July — 50th anniversary of Colegio Maria Alvarado (Lima High School) 
August — cornerstone laid for new girls' dormitory in Lins, Brazil 
October — 75th anniversary of Colegio Piracicabano, Piracicaba, Brazil 

Buildings, equipment, organizations, institutions, activities, projects, meetings 
spell missionary opportunity, but only if there are missionaries to take the spirit 
of Christ into all of life through these means, can the opportunities be realized. 



NOW THIRTY-TWO COUNTRIES 

The Woman's Division of Christian Service has work in the following thirty-two countries: 



Algeria 


Chile 


Liberia 


Sarawak 


Angola 


♦China 


Malaya 


Southern Rhodesia 


Argentina 


Cuba 


Mexico 


Taiwan 


Belgian Congo 


Dominican Republic 


Mozambique 


Tunisia 


Bolivia 


Hong Kong 


Nepal 


United States and Territo 


Brazil 


India 


Pakistan 


ries : Alaska, Hawaii, 


* Bulgaria 


Indonesia 


Peru 


Puerto Rico 


Burma 


Japan 


Philippines 


Uruguay 




Korea 


♦Poland 





The Department of Work in Home Fields administers the work in the United States and 
territories plus the Dominican Republic. 

The Department of Work in Foreign Fields administers the work in the other thirty 
countries. 



•Indicates countries from which no reports are received. 



108 

Southeast Asia and China 

By Clara M. French, Executive Secretary 

THE CHURCH IN SOUTHEAST ASIA through its varied program is bringing 
the spirit of Christ to all of life. In schools of Malaya where Muslim youth 

dare not enter a Christian church; in social centers of Burma and the Philip- 
pines where small children and their parents come for help ; in hospitals and clinics 
of every land where the sick of mind and body find healing, there the spirit of 
Christ is working. 

No other area of the world has such diversity of cultures, languages, religions, 
and political heritages as does Southeast Asia. In no other part of the world is 
change taking place more rapidly. And, even here, Christ is adequate for all. The 
ways in which He is made known must differ. Thus, the work of the church takes 
on such forms as agricultural service, medical care, education, and home visitation. 
With special skills the followers of Christ go into the crowded cities or the remote 
rural areas to bear witness to His power and spirit. 

This report is an attempt to give a picture of the church and the year's work 
through the types of service carried on in the seven countries of Southeast Asia. 
Many worth-while activities will not be mentioned because of space. The most 
recent leaflets, Training Women Leaders in Southeast Asia* and Health Work in 
Sarawak* will add to the understanding of this area. 

Primary and Secondary Schools 

The Methodist Church around the world has emphasized education. This is 
true in countries of Southeast Asia. In Malaya where the government does not 
furnish free education, The Methodist Church is ministering to more than 45,000 
children. Last year it was reported that in the city of Kuala Lumpur alone the 
schools turned away more than a thousand children. Classrooms are crowded and 
schools have expanded even beyond the place where they can furnish a sufficient 
number of Christian teachers to make the best witness. Two schools of the Woman's 
Division this year built additions to their plants. Funds came largely from the local 
people and the government. Next year two other schools are planning similar 
enlargements. 

It is here that Crusade Scholars and short-term missionaries make a significant 
contribution. In a recent letter one teacher said, 

One of the most satisfying experiences is the Prayer Group. We meet a 

few minutes each afternoon. As the girls arrive at school they go to the library 

for the meeting, and it is becoming crowded. Last week one of the girls, a new 

Christian who was baptized at Easter, told what the church meant to her. 

They are growing in their Christian lives and becoming real leaders. 

In Medan, Indonesia, the only Christian Chinese school has built a new junior 
high school. The Woman's Division made possible a large share of the funds for 
the building. This is meeting one of the greatest needs for children of Chinese 
Christians, for without this school these children must attend schools with strong 
Communist influence. 

In Burma the seven schools of The Methodist Church are divided among the 
various language groups: Burmese, Chinese, Indian, and English. The English 
school in Rangoon, a project of the Woman's Division, has 2,500 students represent- 
ing 17 nationalities. Last year a graduate of this school took first place in govern- 



•Available from Literature Headquarters, 7820 Reading Road, Cincinnati 37, Ohio, 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 



109 



ment examinations competing with 28,000 students. Attending this school are many- 
children from Buddhist homes who are in daily contact with Christian teachers 
and students. 



Student Centers and Hostels 

In lands where free education is given by the government, the church has 
developed other patterns of work to train the young people. When the United 
States government went into the Philippines in 1899, officials opened schools. So 
instead of schools, The Methodist Church built hostels in strategic places for both 
high-school and college students. More recently student centers for recreation, study 
and counseling have been opened. Within the past year one new student center 
in Northern Luzon has been opened in a rented house, and plans are under way 
for the building of a large, more adequate, home. 

In Malaya and Burma hostels are related to the church schools. This makes 
a Christian home for many from non-Christian families. It also makes possible 
living quarters for children from the small country churches where there are no 
schools. 

When the Woman's Division entered Sarawak in 1949, schools were well estab- 
lished and girls were enrolled where there were coeducational institutions. In 1954 
a hostel for girls and women workers was opened. Today it is caring for primary and 
high school students, girls training in the school of midwifery, and students of the 
new theological school. Teachers who five in the hostel plan extracurricular activities, 
giving the girls special help in 
Christian home training and 
practical experiences in Chris- 
tian living. 

Higher Education 

Unlike other nations on the 
continent of Asia, this area has 
had few church-related colleges 
and universities. Since the war 
the Methodist Church in the 
Philippines has started one small 
college and has become a part 
of a union college. Many of the 
church leaders are being gradu- 
ated from these schools. There 
is a move at the present time to 
join these two schools and make 
one strong, well-staffed, college. Through the United Board for Christian Higher 
Education in Asia, The Methodist Church is a part of the new Tunghai University 
on Taiwan and the Chung Chi College in Hong Kong. The first class in Tunghai 
was opened in the fall of 1955. From 5,800 applicants, 200 students were selected to 
make up the freshman class. Chung Chi College was founded by leaders in Hong 
Kong in 1951 with 63 students in borrowed rooms. Each year the numbers have 
increased and in 1955 the college graduated 42 men and women. A new campus 
has been given by the government and the college is in the process of building a 
permanent site. These two Christian schools for Chinese are significant in the light 
of the thousands of Chinese students from the area who have gone to the mainland 




Hostels for both high school and college stu- 
dents offer "homes away from home" with a 
Christian atmosphere. 



110 



Southeast Asia 



in search of an education. Chinese educated in these Christian schools will be the 
leaders of tomorrow. 

Education for Chinese Workers 

No other program of the church in Southeast Asia has seen so many changes 
in the last few years as the schools training Christian workers. Two new schools, 
one in Sarawak and one in Indonesia, have been opened, and Trinity College in 
Singapore has gone through many changes. Part of this is due to the growing 
maturity of the church and the great need for indigenous leaders. It is also in the 
thinking of the people that early training of church leaders, if possible, should be 
in the land where they will be working and among the people they will serve. 

In June, 1956, the Chinese Bible 
School in Medan, Indonesia, gradu- 
ated its first class. Already these 
young people have been placed within 
the conference. 

In the same month the new Theo- 
logical School in Sarawak, which had 
been housed in half a missionary resi- 
dence, dedicated its new building. In 
a report of the dedication the new 
principal, Dr. Ivy Chou, says, "The 
presence of Iban Christian leaders, the 
Batak organist, visitors from Malaya 
and the local church witnessed to the 
Christian fellowship that knows no 
bounds or barriers. The writer of the 
service translated it into Iban and 
Chinese and the reality of that fellow- 
ship was vividly sensed by the entire 
group." 

Harris Memorial School in Ma- 
nila for training deaconesses and kin- 
dergarten workers is the only Meth- 
odist school of its kind in Southeast 
Asia. For more than fifty years, it has 
trained women to work in the 
churches. More than six hundred 
women have been graduated, and to- 




Two new buildings completed this year 
are the Theological School in Sibu, Sara- 
wak (upper) which serves men and 
women, Dyaks and Chinese, and the Chi- 
nese Junior High School in Medan, Indo- 
nesia (lower). 



day they are scattered throughout the island of Luzon and even on Mindanao 
assisting the pastors and training small children. Three women from Malaya are 
currently studying in this school preparing for work in their own land. The school 
cooperates with Union Seminary in exchange of instructors and special services. 

Medical Care 

An outstanding medical center in Southeast Asia is the Mary Johnston Hospital 
and School of Nursing in Manila. Last year the hospital admitted 5,026 patients 
and received into its outpatient clinic more than 60,000 people. The staff has been 
greatly helped by the assistant superintendent, a young doctor just returned from 
study in America on a Crusade scholarship. The School of Nursing, one of the 
most highly rated in the Philippines, is becoming a collegiate school cooperating 
with the Philippine Christian Colleges. Two members of the teaching staff are at 
present studying in America and will be returning within the year. The hospital 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 



111 




Medical service to rural people is 
made possible by small health clin- 
ics where nurses and doctors travel 
from one clinic to another and by 
the mobile clinics which go from 
village to village. 



is located in the slum area of Manila where 

poverty and disease are everywhere. Daily 

these people receive the ministry of healing 

from well-trained Christian doctors and 

nurses. 

The Mobile Clinic in the Philippines, 

established since the war, is carried on by 

a Filipino Christian team of doctor, nurse, 

dentist, mechanic and teacher. They travel 

to the remote areas where no other medical 

aid is available. During the day they tend 

the sick and at night they hold evangelistic 

meetings. 

An example of Christian ministry in 

healing has been the new clinic started on 

the Andaman Islands between Burma and 

India. As nationalism increased in the new 

nation of Burma, Indians who were immi- 
grants to that land sought homes on these 

islands. Among them were members of the 

church, and thus an Indian pastor, one of 

the strong leaders of the conference, went with them. His wife was a nurse who had 

worked in clinics in Burma. The need among these refugees could not be ignored, 

so very soon a little clinic was established closely related to the new church. 

In Malaya and Sarawak are well-established clinics under the Woman's Division. 

With workers and funds they could be multiplied manyfold. The programs are 

closely related to the church and to the life of the people. 

The very newest project in medical work is the 
plan for a hospital and longboat clinic among the 
Dyaks of Sarawak. The land, two knolls overlooking 
the Rejang River, has been chosen. The blueprints 
are in process, and boats are being constructed in 
which doctors and nurses can ply the rivers going 
from longhouse to longhouse. Like the other work in 
Sarawak this will be an international venture with 
workers from Sumatra, Malaya, China, America and, 
it is hoped, other countries. 

Social Work 

In the heart of Rangoon two small social centers, 
one for Chinese and one for Burmese, serve the poor 
people of the community. In addition to regularly 
employed workers in these centers are volunteer 
workers from the churches. 

In Manila is one of the largest social centers in 
that part of Asia. This center has counseling service, 
two kindergartens for children of working mothers, 
health clinics, library service, recreational activities, 
and club meetings. A social welfare worker from 
near this center, a Roman Catholic, said this com- 
munity had almost no juvenile delinquency, and she 
felt it was due to the Methodist center. In a recent 




Every country of Southeast 
Asia needs trained kinder- 
garten teachers. They 
serve in schools, churches, 
and social centers. 



112 



Southeast Asia 




letter from one of their workers was this statement: "In one of the groups the boys 
are hearing for the first time the story of Christ as read from the Bible. Most of 
the boys are from the Roman Catholic faith. Lives are being changed. About a 
month ago I stood with Juan at the altar of Central Church as he was baptized and 
received into fellowship of the church." 

The new housing areas in Malaya are offering rich fields for evangelism. Two 
Chinese girls, who were graduated from Trinity College in June, and one missionary 
are opening a new social center in one of these areas in Kuala Lumpur, the capital 
of Malaya. Trained workers in the city are volunteering their services. Plans are 

being made for a church nearby so that 
clinic, kindergarten, all activities of the cen- 
ter can be a part of the Christian church. 

Rural Work 

Southeast Asia is largely rural. The 
vast majority of the population are sub- 
sistence farmers, eating much of what they 
grow. The church is working among these 
people and is calling increasingly for work- 
ers in rural sociology and agriculture. 

In the Philippines deaconesses, pastors, 
and missionaries cooperate in rural pro- 
grams. They have harvest festivals, plant- 
ing ceremonies, the Lord's Acre plan, 4-H 
Clubs, agricultural bulletins and rural insti- 
tutes. During the year there is special 
agricultural training for rural ministers. As 
farmers learn to raise better crops they 

learn Christian stewardship and its relation to everyday life. 

In Sarawak the Division of World Missions has had two missionary families 

trained in rural work, carrying on programs both for the Chinese and Dyak farmers. 

It is the hope that the Woman's Division will send workers who can help in this 

program, going into the homes and working among women and children. 

Other Programs Within the Church 

The need for more and better literature is evidenced by the request for workers 
trained in this field. Manila and Singapore have been the centers of literature pro- 
duction. Committees in both centers have been working on curriculum material 
for religious education classes. Better Christian literature and more literature suit- 
able to the indigenous churches is needed. 

In the Philippines the Methodist Church cooperates with the Federation in a 
strong audio-visual program. Cooperative programs are also carried on in Burma 
and Malaya where the National Councils have had successful evangelistic programs 
through the use of this medium. 

In every land there is an active youth organization. In some of the churches, 
youth have taken a lead in the spiritual life of the church and in volunteer service 
for others. On the island of Mindanao in the Philippines are a group of well-trained 
youth carrying on a rural program. Their support is very little beyond their living 
expenses. Their service to the church is an example of Christian devotion. In 
Malaya youth have organized work camps to build churches and a training center 
in an underprivileged area. Many of these groups are in need of adult leadership. 



Rural workers minister to Dyak 
families near Kapit, Sarawak. 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields 



113 



Within the last year Philip Potter, Chairman of the Youth Department of the World 
Council of Churches, visited the youth within this area. He was impressed with the 
well-organized groups and the enthusiasm which they showed. He reminded them, 
however, of the need for purpose and substance in their programs, emphasizing their 
basic Christian faith and beliefs. 

The Woman's Society of Christian Service in these countries has increased in 
numbers, in giving, and in broadening their vision. Women of the Philippines have 
taken the lead in helping to support a missionary in Okinawa. Crusade Scholars 
passing through Okinawa have stopped to see the work and report to the home 
Societies. Women in Hong Kong and Taiwan, within the last year, have organized 
on a national basis and already have started training schools for their members. 
From Southeast Asia three national presidents attended the World Federation of 
Methodist Women and took a major part in 
the meeting. Other members of the area were 
in attendance and made real contributions. 

Visitors to the Church of Southeast Asia 

The large port cities of Southeast Asia are 
on the main line of communications between the 
East and West. The churches are host to many 
guests. From Singapore missionaries wrote of 
the impressive city-wide meeting held while 
Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam was there. From Ma- 
nila came word that 40,000 people, the largest 
number ever to assemble on the invitation of 
evangelical churches, met when Billy Graham 
spoke in the city stadium. More recently has 
come the news of the visit of Dr. E. Stanley Jones 
to Burma and Malaya. In Burma Dr. Jones con- 
ducted an ashram at Kingswood School, Kalaw, 
and a mass meeting in Rangoon. From Rangoon 
they said, "Such interdenominational gatherings 
have tremendous influence in this predominantly 
Buddhist community. The Methodist Church 
was happy to cooperate in making this occasion 
possible." 




Three Conference Presidents: 

(left to right) Mrs. Lee Kong 

Beng, Malaya; Mrs. Jose L. 

Valencia, Philippines ; and Miss 

Florence Chen, Taiwan. 



Mainland China 

Visits have been made to Communist China within the last year. In the fall 
of 1955, five British Quakers made a good-will tour. Later the East Asia Secretariat 
of the International Missionary Council visited Christians in Shanghai, Peking, and 
Canton. City churches on the mainland are open. Theological education for the 
Protestant churches has been consolidated into four centers: Nanking, Peking, 
Chungking, and Canton. It is reported that some Chinese leaders who have not 
been heard from for several years have been released from prison. There is hope 
for more contacts with Chinese friends. It will, however, demand from western 
Christians a sensitivity and understanding not always displayed by the church in 
the past. 

Bangkok, the Geneva of Asia 

Someone has likened Bangkok to Geneva, Switzerland. It is true that a number 
of interdenominational groups have met in this city. It is also true that Thailand 



114 Southeast Asia 

is a free nation. Strongly Buddhist, yet it radiates an air of cordiality to 
the Christian. It was the privilege of the writer to attend three meetings held in 
Bangkok in March, 1956. No one could be present without being aware of "New 
Asia." The real joy in "getting to know" one another was far more real than these 
words from Broadway have suggested. One had a feeling that this was truly the 
beginning of a new day. 

Two conferences on theological education were held simultaneously, one for 
the leaders and the other for the students in theological schools. People from 13 
countries representing the major denominations of Asia were present. It was a 
study conference searching out ways whereby these schools could better serve the 
churches in a rapidly changing environment. Responsibilities were placed on 
the delegates to continue this study and report back through correspondence, 
literature, or other meetings. 

Following this conference was a consultation called by the International Mis- 
sionary Council and the World Council of Churches. Forty leaders from 14 countries 
of Asia met to discuss ways in which the churches together could strengthen their 
missionary efforts through the exchange of personnel and the sending of Asian mis- 
sionaries to other fields. Freely these delegates expressed a desire to determine their 
own policies, to govern their churches and to accept the responsibility of taking 
the gospel message to all people. The result of this meeting was a plan to meet 
again a year later after churches have studied ways for carrying out some cooperative 
missionary program. 

The final meeting in Bangkok was a Methodist Consultation. With the exception 
of Indonesia all countries where the Methodists have work were represented. Reports 
on the work of the church in various countries were made and discussion periods 
followed. The consultation attempted to lay the foundation for area strategy. 
Great interest was shown in sending Asian missionaries to other lands and especially 
to Sarawak, a land of decision for this quadrennium. 

If one were to study the history of the Methodist Church in this area, he would 
realize that such regional strategy is not new. The name of Bishop Thoburn of 
India is connected with the early beginnings of the church in the Philippines, in 
Burma, and in Malaya. When Chinese Christians migrated from Fukien, China, 
to Sarawak, Bishop Warne of India met them in Hong Kong and helped them get 
started. Dr. Benjamin West, a missionary in Malaya, helped to start the work in 
Sarawak and Sumatra. It is an answer in obedience to His call. The Spirit of Christ 
knows no bounds. 



Week of Prayer and Self-Denial 
1957 Recipients 

In the United States: 

A Community Center and Residence Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio 
A new building at Peek Home, Polo, Illinois 

In Other Lands : 

Dormitory, Hiroshima High School, Japan 
Dormitory, Aoyama Gakuin, Tokyo, Japan 
Other dormitories as funds permit 



Department of Work in Home Fields 

"All" is a very inclusive word. The spirit of Christ for tdl of life in 
today's society poses tremendous responsibilities for every Christian. 
May the foundations laid by the endeavors here recorded be worthy 
of a superstructure which will include Christ in every area of life's 
great adventure. This is our high hope. 

Mrs. J. N. Rodeheaver, Chairman 



Commission on Deaconess Work 

By Mary Lou Barnwell, Executive Secretary 

THE first quadrennium of the Commission on Deaconess "Work, under its pres- 
ent organization, has come to a close. A review of its work indicates that 
the changes in structure and procedures were good. 

Organization 

Until 1952, the Bureau of Deaconess Work had in its membership one bishop, 
chosen by the Council of Bishops; the executive secretaries of the Department of 
Work in Home Fields; the executive secretary of the Bureau of Deaconess Work; 
three persons from each jurisdiction chosen by the jurisdiction Deaconess Asso- 
ciation, two of whom were deaconesses, the third was an officer of the jurisdiction 
Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

In 1952 the bureau was changed to a commission and the plan for member- 
ship provided for wider representation. The commission now includes one bishop, 
chosen by the Council of Bishops; four persons from each jurisdiction, chosen by 
the jurisdiction Deaconess Association, two of whom shall be deaconess members 
of the association, one a minister of the jurisdiction, and one the president of the 
jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service; three representatives of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service chosen by the Division; one representa- 
tive of the Board of Pensions; one representative of the Board of Hospitals and 
Homes; one representative of the Board of Education; the secretary of the 
Interboard Committee on Christian Vocations; and one personnel secretary of 
the Board of Missions. The executive secretary of the commission is a member 
without vote. 

This wider representation has many advantages. It creates greater interest 
throughout the church and its agencies. It makes possible the sharing of ideas 
at a point where policies can be recommended. It emphasizes the place of the 
deaconess in the total church. 

Committees 

The members of the commission have carried their responsibilities faithfully. 
A committee on promotion has recommended long-range plans for more effective 
interpretation of the program of deaconess work. These suggestions include leaf- 
lets and pamphlets designed to instruct and to challenge; articles for the church 

115 



116 Commission on Deaconess Work 

press, including conference papers and magazines; and a sound motion picture. 

A committee on recruitment has studied present practices and has made sug- 
gestions which have been channeled to conference Deaconess Boards, conference 
Commissions on Christian Vocations, and the Board of Missions. It recom- 
mended a memorial which was sent to General Conference requesting a Day of 
Recruitment, perhaps in connection with an existing special day, such as Student 
Day. In view of the fact that such a day was not designated by General Confer- 
ence, the matter should be brought to the attention of the General Conference 
in 1960. 

A committee on in-service training has made helpful suggestions for dea- 
conesses on the job. It has suggested ways to improve reading habits and provided 
reading lists and bibliographies. It has stressed participation in church, civic 
and professional conferences, and institutes. It has emphasized the values of 
sabbatical leaves. It has sought to stimulate the deaconesses to use all available 
resources to expand their minds and become better prepared to meet the needs 
of this shrinking world with its increasing human problems. 

Other committees have studied and made recommendations regarding con- 
ference Deaconess Boards, fields of service, personnel practices, sabbatical leaves, 
standards and requirements, and other matters of concern. Much of the work 
of the commission has been done through these committees. The executive secre- 
tary tries to put into effect the policies and practices which are recommended by 
the commission and approved by the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Conference Deaconess Boards 

There are now 60 organized Deaconess Boards in annual conferences and 
several others are in the process of being organized. They function with varying 
degrees of effectiveness. Increased enthusiasm seems to have arisen in boards 
which have participated in the institutes for Deaconess Boards. Forty-one con- 
ferences have already been included in institutes. Plans are under way to cover 
the other conferences within the next year. Upon the suggestion of one of the 
participants, a representative from the Commission on Christian Vocations will 
be added to the delegated group from each annual conference in future institutes. 
When this series has been completed, the executive secretary expects to work 
more directly with individual conference Deaconess Boards. Letters of informa- 
tion and suggestions are sent to them from time to time. 

Recruitments and Statistics 

Recruitment continues to be one of our major concerns. Perhaps we are 
still feeling the effect of overemphasis on "making your vocation Christian" and 
underemphasis on answering the call to serve in a church-related vocation. 

The Joint Committee on Missionary Personnel of the Board of Missions has 
three full-time secretaries, one of whom is a deaconess, working throughout the 
church. In addition, two associate secretaries have been recently added to the 
staff. One of these is a deaconess. Three field workers (one a deaconess) travel 
over the country, visiting churches, campuses and conferences. One is giving 
special attention to young adults; the other two are working with college students. 

Recruitment literature is being carefully revised. More articles on personnel 
needs, opportunities, and procedures are appearing in the church press. An article 
in the Classmate, April 20, 1956, has brought many inquiries from high school 
students. Their names have been sent to conference Deaconess Boards with the 



Department of Work in Home Fields 117 

request that encouragement and guidance be given to these young women. 

The Woman's Division has approved the request of the commission that a 
sound motion picture be produced during this quadrennium to interpret deaconess 
work. It should be used widely and should result in further interest in the office 
of deaconess. 

During the past year 18 deaconesses have retired; 8 have withdrawn (5 for 
marriage, 3 for employment outside The Methodist Church) ; 1 has transferred 
to foreign work. This represents a total loss of 27 from the active list. 

During the same period 11 have been commissioned, 1 has been reinstated, 
and 2 have transferred from foreign work. Only 14 have been added to the 
group of deaconesses under appointment. However, there are 30 approved can- 
didates in training, and several more are in the process of completing their appli- 
cations. 

Orientation 

The first orientation program for deaconess candidates was conducted at 
Lake Junaluska, North Carolina, in July, 1955. Eighteen of the accepted candi- 
dates were able to be present. 

In addition to discussions related to the meaning of the deaconess relation- 
ship, its history, opportunities, privileges, and responsibilities, there was Bible 
study under the direction of Dr. John Johannaber of National College for Chris- 
tian Workers, Kansas City, Missouri. The discussions, study, and fellowship 
helped create a sense of unity, a common purpose, and a deep appreciation for 
the rich heritage which is ours. 

The program was held during the time of the School of Missions of the 
Southeastern Jurisdiction, providing additional privileges for the candidates. The 
members of the Woman's Societies who were attending the School of Missions 
gained interest in and enthusiasm for recruitment from the association with these 
young women. 

The Woman's Division approved the recommendation of the commission 
that such an orientation program be held every two years. The candidates found 
it most helpful. 

Curriculum Study 

For several years a committee has been studying the curriculum of National 
College, Kansas City, Missouri and also that of Scarritt College, Nashville, 
Tennessee, in relation to the preparation needed for deaconess work. Question- 
naires were sent to a number of deaconesses in various types of work to ascer- 
tain what formal courses and informal activities had been most beneficial in their 
work; what had been of least value; and what was needed which was not available. 

After the questionnaires had been tabulated, a group composed of faculty 
representatives from the two colleges and the staff of the Department of Work 
in Home Fields met together for two days to study and discuss the report. The 
findings disclosed that both colleges now have most of the courses which seem to 
be needed for the training of deaconesses. In some instances there needs to be a 
revision or adaptation of content. 

The consultation was of great value. It was agreed that the next step should 
be a series of discussions with faculty members on the two campuses. This 
further process will be initiated in the fall of 1956. 

Both colleges seek suggestions. They are eager to make any possible adjust- 
ments in curriculum which are needed and can be included in the area of their 
requirements. 



118 Commission on Deaconess Work 

Sabbatical Leaves 

The commission encourages deaconesses to take advantage of a sabbatical 
leave whenever feasible. It is provided, not as compensation for what one has 
done, but as an opportunity for special preparation for further work in the 
church. 

The sabbatical leave is for one year, at least nine months of which are to 
be spent in study. The other three months may be for study, travel, or rest. 

During the leave, full or partial salary is supposed to be paid by the em- 
ploying agency. Up to the present, the Woman's Division of Christian Service 
is the only employing agency which has assumed that financial responsibility. 
For those who serve in projects of the Woman's Division, the following financial 
provision is made for the sabbatical year: a salary of $100 monthly; a study 
allowance of $200 per quarter of study; the cost of one round trip in excess of 
$25 from her home or appointment to the college. To fulfill her obligation for 
such leave, a deaconess is expected to serve in a project of the Woman's Division 
at least four years following the leave. If she fails to fulfill the obligation com- 
pletely, she is expected to repay a proportionate amount of the money which 
was made available to her. 

The commission adopted a policy which encourages other employing agencies 
to pay $100 annually into a fund for sabbatical leave. When this becomes opera- 
tive, any deaconess eligible for a sabbatical leave may receive salary through the 
Commission on Deaconess Work. During the past year five deaconesses have been 
on sabbatical leave with salaries paid by the Woman's Division. Six have been 
on leave, studying at their own expense. 

Leave of Absence 

After a careful study of leaves of absence since unification, it was agreed 
that previous policies should be reaffirmed. Under those policies, which were in 
effect in the Methodist Episcopal Church and in the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, a deaconess may be granted a leave of absence for a maximum of three 
years. If she is then unable to return to active service, she will relinquish her 
office as a deaconess with the privilege of applying for reinstatement at such time 
as she may be appointed again. This policy was re-established as of September 1, 
1955. 

A leave of absence may be granted for only three reasons: necessary home 
duties, health, or study. If a deaconess withdraws from regular appointment for 
any other reason, she accepts an honorable discharge, with the privilege of ap- 
plying for reinstatement when she is ready to accept an appointment. 

Retirement Age 

With a compulsory retirement age, it was necessary for many deaconesses 
to retire while they were still able and willing to serve effectively for several 
additional years. In some instances, vacancies created by their retirements were 
filled by persons who were not so well trained and were perhaps even older than 
the deaconesses who were compelled to retire. Many deaconesses wished to con- 
tinue to serve; the agencies of the church desired their continued service. 

In September, 1955, the Woman's Division approved an action removing the 
compulsory clause from the retirement provisions. With the present arrangement, 
one who is eligible for pension may retire with pension at the age of 65 if it is 



Department of Work in Home Fields 119 

no longer advisable for her to accept an appointment. If mutually agreeable 
between the worker and the employing agency, a deaconess may now continue 
to serve even beyond the age of 70. She will continue to draw a salary from 
the employing agency as long as she is employed. When the employment has 
ceased, she will be eligible to receive pension through the Woman's Division of 
Christian Service if she has fulfilled requirements for participating in the pension 
plan. Pension and salary are not paid simultaneously to deaconesses employed in 
agencies of The Methodist Church. 

It is conceivable that some most significant contributions may be made by 
those who have passed the usual retirement age. Some time ago the magazine, 
Sunshine, issued a statement to the effect that 

An examination made of the careers of some four hundred men, the most 
notable of their time and outstanding in many activities — statesmen, painters, 
warriors, poets, writers — shows that the decade of years between 60 and 70 
contained 35 per cent of the world's greatest achievements; between 70 and 80 
years, 23 per cent; after 80 years, 8 per cent. In other words, 64 per cent of the 
great achievements have been acoomplished by men who have passed their 60th 
year. 

"It does not yet appear what we shall be!" 

Week of Prayer Fund 

Every fourth year a portion of the Week of Prayer offering is designated 
for deaconess pension. This helps substantially in making up the deficit in the 
appropriation. 

The turn to participate in this offering came again in 1955. Our share amounted 
to more than $235,000. Through this "over and above" gift the members of the 
Woman's Society of Christian Service and Wesleyan Service Guild express their 
appreciation for the faithful, dedicated service rendered through the church by 
the deaconesses. 

General Conference 

General Conference of 1956 took no actions which affected the organization 
of the Commission on Deaconess Work. Several things, however, have implica- 
tions for deaconesses. 

It should be pointed out that the granting of clergy rights for women does 
not mean that because one is a deaconess she now has full membership in an 
annual conference. To obtain that relationship, she must meet all the require- 
ments of any ministerial candidate. If a deaconess is accepted for full member- 
ship in an annual conference, she thereby relinquishes her deaconess relation- 
ship. One could not have full and partial membership in an annual conference 
simultaneously. 

Unless a deaconess is especially qualified and expects to devote herself 
completely to serving as an itinerant minister, it would seem inadvisable at this 
time to apply for full membership in an annual conference. We do not want 
to do anything which would jeopardize the status which has been granted Meth- 
odist women. 

The two emphases for the total church which were adopted by the General 
Conference are of major concern to all deaconesses. The emphases on the local 
church and higher education are related to every phase of deaconess work as 
the deaconesses seek to train individuals for Christian living and responsible 
citizenship. Each one will also have an opportunity to work through her agency 



120 Commission on Deaconess Work 

or project to help interpret to the local community the actions regarding the 
Central Jurisdiction. She will have a responsibility also in helping to create a 
situation in which there are no barriers of any sort. 

Extending Our Fellowship 

There is increasing emphasis upon interdenominational and international 
fellowship among deaconesses. The Commission on Deaconess Work is a mem- 
ber of the International Federation of Deaconess Associations. The next meeting 
of the federation will be held in France in 1957 and it is hoped that Methodist 
deaconesses in the United States of America will be represented in that meeting. 

The fellowship of deaconesses in the United States was strengthened in 
February, when representatives from all Protestant deaconess groups were in- 
vited to participate in a conference in St. Louis, Missouri. This was the first 
interdenominational deaconess conference to be held in this country. About 75 
deaconesses representing the 1,400 deaconesses in the United States were present. 
Most of them, except the Methodists, were in garb. One Methodist deaconess also 
wore the garb. 

The exchange of ideas, the rich fellowship, and the inspiration of the pro- 
gram produced a unity of spirit and a consciousness that no deaconess is alone in 
her effort. We were made aware that "walking alone, one can reach only her 
arm's length; together, we may reach around the world." 

To foster the fellowship and strengthen the unity, it was agreed that another 
such conference should be held two years hence. In the meantime, there will be 
a sharing of materials and other resources as we continue to join hands in 
Christian service. This meeting was reported in The Methodist Woman. 

The Southeastern Jurisdiction Deaconess Association again reached out across 
the seas as it sent a love gift to the Martha-Maria Verein in Nuremberg, Ger- 
many. Extensive losses were suffered by that Motherhouse during the war. Their 
efforts to rebuild have been nothing short of heroic. 

In response to the gift, the following note was received: 

Our Mutter Oberin Ruth, now being in the state of repose, handed me your 
dear letter with the fine enclosure of 50 $. We are pleased that you had good 
experiences with us in Nuremberg. Your taking part in the re-erection of our 
motherhouse strengthens our faith and means a special joy to us, for we hope 
we may start building the motherhouse this year. 

You know the steep way we have to go in order to concentrate our service 
on the site in the suburbs. Some weeks ago we dedicated a home for 63 nursing 
pupils there. It is a very fine house, but we are facing a lot of difficulties because 
of the partition of our work. We pray the Lord for his help to overcome this time. 

May I ask you, dear Sister Mary, to forward our grateful regards to all givers. 
The Lord bless giver and gift! We trust you have not too much troubles in your 
deaconess work. The Lord's grace be with you every day. With the very best wishes 
to you and all your sisters, and cordial regards. 

Conclusion 

And now we confront a new quadrennium. We enter it with our vision lifted, 
our fellowship extended, our concerns deepened. The world is changing around 
us. Some find it difficult to accept new patterns of organization, of work, of 
living. They are like the old man who said, "I've seen many changes in my day 
and I've been agin' every one of them." They talk about what is lost, failing to 
accept what is left and to recognize what is gained. 

As we seek, during this new quadrennium, to realize the aim, "The Spirit of 



Department of Work in Home Fields 



121 



Christ — For All of Life," there will be no time or place for things which separate 
us. We must move forward in unity, not contending for small things, but striving 
for great issues. Our marching orders may be taken from a summary of the 
devotional message brought by Bishop Glenn R. Phillips at the last meeting of 
the executive committee of the commission. He called us to 

Lift up our eyes and see 
Lift up our hearts and pray 
Lift up our feet and go 
Lift up our hands and serve. 




At the Annual Meeting of the Woman's Division held at Buck Hill Falls, 
Pennsylvania, Miss Alpharetta Leeper, secretary for Missionary Personnel 
(right), chats with Miss Lena McRoberts (left), Philadelphia Deaconess Home, 
and Miss Jean Morgan (center), Frances De Pauw Home for Girls, Hollywood, 
California. Both were commissioned deaconesses after having served as U.S.-2's. 



122 

Educational Institutions 

By Muriel Day, Executive Secretary 

THIRTY-ONE EDUCATIONAL CENTERS are affiliated with this phase of 
the Department of Work in Home Fields. Twenty-one of these serve young 

people of college age ; the rest minister to those of high-school and grade-school 
years. In all, over 11,000 pupils are reached. 

The over-all objectives of these educational institutions are: (1) to meet an 
educational need; (2) to develop interracial and international understanding; (3) 
to train for local church and community leadership; (4) to train for full-time 
Christian service. 

The specific objectives of the educational institutions are: home training; health 
education; strong academic work; the right use of leisure time; Christian commit- 
ment and growth. 

While all the educational institutions encompass these objectives, each admin- 
istrator was asked to emphasize only one objective in his annual report. 

Home Training 

Erie School, Olive Hill, Kentucky. Typical of the emphasis in home training 
is the program at Erie School. In Aiken Hall, the girls' dormitory, home training 
includes several phases of living and learning. It is emphasized in home economics 
classes where the girls learn the value of foods, how to plan and prepare a balanced 
meal, and how to budget their income. They also learn to distinguish various 
fabrics and how to fit and model dresses suitable in appearance and satisfactory 
in detail. 

Naturally this training overflows into the life within the dormitory. For instance, 
each girl takes her turn in helping to prepare meals. Although the quantities of 
food used in the big kitchens are greater than those in home economics classes, yet 
the principles of preparation are the same. 

Another area of homemaking is in keeping rooms and living quarters in order. 
Cleanliness is constantly stressed. Here harmony in the arrangement of furniture 
and the hanging of pictures is also important. Surrounding all this training is an 
atmosphere of loving concern for the child, her response and development. 

Eliza Dee Hall, Austin, Texas. Still affectionately called "The Home," Eliza 
Dee Hall is a center for young women pursuing a college education. The forty-five 
Huston-Tillotson seniors who resided in Eliza Dee Hall during the 1955-56 school 
term showed remarkable loyalty and concern for each other's well-being. The 
interests of the group were centered largely in the Sunday-school organization, an 
at-home activity for worship and discussion. Relating the stories of the Bible to 
everyday living, the young women grew in Christian stature and developed a spirit 
of togetherness. 

During the year plans were made to convert Eliza Dee Hall into an international 
residence for young women attending the University of Texas. The change was 
possible since Huston-Tillotson has built new dormitories on the main campus. The 
new project will serve as a laboratory in democratic and Christian living for young 
women of different races and nationalities. 

Browning Home and Mather Academy, Camden, South Carolina. This home 
and school unit is well prepared to give students home training. A period for train- 
ing under a supervisor is set apart every day so that students learn the proper 
way to keep house. 



Department of Work in Home Fields 123 

Sager-Brown Home and Godman School, Baldwin, Louisiana. The physical 
plant at Sager-Brown Home and Godman School has been improved. All specifica- 
tions for the state having been met, the home was relicensed for child care in May, 
1955. Recreational improvements included the purchase of television sets for the 
boys' and girls' dormitories. The children were made happy with gifts and treats 
during the Yuletide season and other holidays. The school chorus had a trip to 
Grace Methodist Church in New Orleans, and all the children enjoyed the vacation 
Bible school picnic. Missionary groups, totaling 160 persons, visited the campus 
during the year. 

Health Education 

Ferrum Junior College, Ferrum, Virginia. The emphasis at Ferrum Junior 
College illustrates the goals of all colleges for health education. 

The program in health education includes three approaches: the academic, the 
program of physical education, and athletics. In the academic field, Ferrum College 
offers courses in health and hygiene. Many elect this subject. A new course is 
being added this year for those who may wish to specialize in health or medical 
services. This is an "Introduction to Hospital Sciences" and is offered in cooperation 
with the Franklin County Memorial Hospital. It is intended to introduce students 
to the areas of nursing, X-ray, the science of the laboratory technician, medical 
records, and hospital dietetics. 

The objective of athletics is to encourage as many students as possible to 
participate. Intramural and intercollegiate athletics are sponsored. Touch football, 
softball, basketball, tennis, ping-pong, and other games make for lively competition 
among the many intramural teams entered in the tournaments. The intercollegiate 
athletics include football, basketball, and track. Lessons learned in these activities 
will contribute to an emphasis on good health throughout all of life. 

Academic Work 

Elizabeth Ritter Hall, Athens, Tennessee. This dormitory has long been a 
responsibility of the women of Methodism. It is now the joint responsibility of the 
Tennessee Wesleyan College and the Woman's Division. To strengthen its academic 
program, the college has emphasized the following: 

1. The Curriculum Committee has met regularly and evaluated every aspect 
of the course offerings. 

2. The state of Tennessee has recognized the superior plans Wesleyan is 
formulating for teacher-training certification by granting approval of the revised 
curriculum which provides a more liberal arts program in the first two years, and 
defers professional courses until the junior and senior years. 

3. Educators have been consulted regularly concerning the academic program. 

4. In its literature Tennessee Wesleyan interprets a liberal education as basic 
to the creation of wholeness of personality — one of the primary aims of the college. 

Allen High School, Asheville, North Carolina. This school rejoices in its fine 
new building. It contains an auditorium seating 300, with facilities for dramatic 
productions and the finest in stage and auditorium lighting. The seven practice 
rooms for piano students and the music studio accommodate more music students. 
The school has won recognition in the community and state through its plays and 
musical programs. 

The cafeteria offers students of home economics an opportunity for practical 
experience. Students from the Library Club have actual experience in library work. 



124 



Educational Institutions 



Allen High School is accredited by The Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. In addition to the curriculum required for this accreditation, 
work is also required in religious education. Worship services are presented, and 
each senior has charge of one chapel program during the year. 

George 0. Robinson School, Santurce, Puerto Rico. The superintendent, Miss 
Helen Aldrich, reports encouraging news concerning literacy. Over 20,000 adults, 
from 22 to 68 years of age, received their high-school diplomas in May, 1956. In 
1950, 25 per cent of the population did not know how to read or write. By June, 
1955, illiteracy had been reduced to 19 per cent. It is the goal of the government 
to reduce illiteracy to 10 per cent by 1960. 

And what part is the Woman's Division playing in this effort to educate the 
people of Puerto Rico ? This past year there were 883 children in the kindergartens 
and primary schools under the Robinson Extension Schools. Each school, located 
in a Methodist church, is in an area where the public schools are too crowded, or 
enrollment is impossible for many first-graders. 

One of the hardest tasks of the superintendent of Robinson School from April 
through August is to tell parents, who come begging that their children be given 
an opportunity to attend Robinson School, "There is no room." Children have to 
be refused admission in every grade. 

The government's industrial program continually brings people from the United 
States to set up and supervise industries. With them come their families, including 
school-age children. The possibility that there will be no room either at Robinson 
or at any other English-speaking school never occurs to them. 




Miss Muriel Day, executive secretary for Educational Institutions, visits a 
class at George O. Robinson School, Santurce, Puerto Rico. 

Sue Bennett College, London, Kentucky. Miss Oscie Sanders, president of Sue 
Bennett College, requested each faculty member to keep a running evaluation of 
his work during the year and present a summary. 

From these summary statements emerged the recurring ideas that, through 
the academic work at Sue Bennett College, a student comes to realize: (1) his place 
in society; (2) the necessity of learning to think independently in these trying 



Department of Work in Home Fields 125 

times; (3) the responsibility he has for self-expression and for acting on the basis 
of his thinking and convictions. 

The academic success of students who go from Sue Bennett to four-year colleges 
and universities is carefully checked. The current report (for the last five years) 
shows that the students rank higher in academic work in the four-year situations 
than they did at Sue Bennett College. This indicates that they have learned some 
of the disciplines of study and application in their first two years of college. 

Right Use of Leisure Time 

Harwood Girls' School, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Harwood Girls' School 
offers many opportunities for developing talents and abilities through leisure-time 
activities. Through their physical education work the older girls learn to participate 
in and enjoy such sports as badminton, volleyball, and table tennis, as well as 
swimming, softball, and basketball. The younger girls enjoy roller skating, active 
group games, and supervised playground activities. Active games and contests, 
with all of their concomitant teachings, are part of the program at Harwood. Classes 
in music, literature, home economics, and art also help the student develop tech- 
niques for using leisure time to a greater advantage. 

Schools like Harwood offer a plus quality to this leisure activity through the 
Christian foundation for all work. Such clubs as Youth Temperance Club, Future 
Homemakers of America, and Future Nurses of America are popular. During the 
past year, each one of these clubs made a definite contribution to local service 
groups — preparing kits of toys for children in the cerebral palsy home; making 
surgical dressings at the American Cancer Society; addressing letters and stuffing 
envelopes for the Tuberculosis Association ; preparing prayer cards to be distributed 
on the breakfast trays of patients in three local hospitals, one of which is the Bataan 
Memorial Methodist Hospital. 

The girls are trained to use their quiet hours for meditation and spiritual re- 
freshment. Though most of the time at Harwood is scheduled, the girls are given 
an opportunity to plan some free hours — to decide whether to donate their time to 
service for others or to use it for purely personal enjoyment such as watching tele- 
vision, attending movies, or having parties. The staff helps the girls to achieve a 
healthy balance in their leisure-time activities. 

Louisiana Polytechnic Institute, Ruston, Louisiana. Miss Pearlye Maye Kelley, 
student counselor at Louisiana Polytechnic Institute, writes, "Theoretically, we 
work on the assumption of budgeted time. We believe study must predominate, 
but we think time for sleeping, eating, recreation, social life, and worship must be 
included in the whole. 

"We discovered that what is leisure for some may be boredom for others. 
Therefore, the following activities were scheduled as possibilities: library, record- 
playing, radio, and piano; table and yard games such as scrabble, rook, canasta, 
ping-pong, horseshoes, badminton, croquet; use of the kitchen by special groups 
for making candy, cookies, or supper; open house and get-togethers following Sun- 
day evening church service; intramural sports and projects; Bible study, and skeptics 
hour." 

Christian Commitment and Growth 

Navajo Methodist Mission School, Farmington, New Mexico. Some of the first 
experiences of the little six-year-old Navajo children who trade their reservation 
homes for a home at the Navajo Methodist Mission School are religious devotions 
at bedtime in the dormitory, prayers before meals in the dining hall, and Bible 



126 Educational Institutions 

stories as part of the lessons in the schoolroom. On Sundays, combed, scrubbed, and 
dressed in their best, children attend Sunday school and proudly go to church 
services in beautiful Ryder Memorial Chapel with the older students and staff. 

As they grow older, Sunday evening Youth Fellowship and student midweek 
prayer services become important activities. Most of the high-school students also 
take turns leading devotions in the dining hall, and some serve on the board of 
stewards of the church. 

Through these experiences, together with the influence of the consecrated Chris- 
tian lives of staff members and the wise spiritual counsel of an understanding pastor, 
they come to put their trust in Christ as Lord and Savior. Some love and trust 
Him almost from the first, while others are indifferent and take longer to respond. 
A few may even be resistant as they enter high school so that when they do yield 
to Christ, it is a noticeable turning point in their lives. Almost without exception, 
students make their decisions for Christ, are baptized, and join the church before 
they complete high school. 

Christian teaching and training do not stop with activities distinctly religious. 
Possibly as much Christianity is learned at the workbench, on the playground, in 
the hayfield, on the basketball floor, in the dining hall, and in the dormitory room 
as is learned in church. 

Another fine class graduated from the high school of the Navajo Methodist 
Mission in May, 1956. Their growth in Christian personality and character has been 
remarkable. As has been true of recent graduating classes, many will go on to 
college. Possibly 85 per cent of the graduates of the past three years will be enrolled 
in schools of higher learning this fall. 

Boylan-Haven School, Jacksonville, Florida. The superintendent, Mrs. Edith 
Carter, writes, "Many facets of life infringe upon and influence the human spirit 
in its development toward Christian commitment and growth in Christ's way of 
life! Frustrations, the sense of failure, the devastating results of repeated rejection, 
the imposed inferior status which in so many instances is the lot of our Negro youth 
often create in their personalities an aggressiveness and bitterness which produce 
combative reactions that must be overcome before this love of Christ can find lodg- 
ment in their hearts. Basic to the opening of life to the spirit of Christ is a sense 
of belonging, of being wanted for ourselves, a sense of personal worth which is 
nurtured and strengthened as we begin to feel ourselves a real part of a group. 
This we feel to be of utmost importance. Therefore, throughout all our efforts is 
the underlying desire to have the girls develop a sense of personal worth and a 
self-respect that will make Christian commitment imperative as a natural response 
to a loving Father who cares for them, loves them for what they are and what, 
by His grace, they may become. 

'At Boylan-Haven, we have sought to help our girls to know the love of God 
through our love for them; through our patient willingness to teach them, even 
through their mistakes, if need be. We have sought to help them choose better 
ways, and develop inner controls rather than be governed by strict disciplinary 
pressure imposed from without. They have the privilege of helping to make the 
rules of conduct and are encouraged to evaluate their responses and behavior. As 
they left us this past June, many of our senior girls expressed their gratitude for 
the loving, understanding patience of members of our faculty. 

"Of course, religious activities are only a means to an end. The real test of 
the validity of our Christian experiences and growth comes when lives are really 
changed — when girls who come to us full of rebellion and bitterness or careless self- 
centeredness are changed into happy-hearted, responsive, loving children of God." 



Department of Work in Home Fields 



127 




Girls from Bennett 
College, Greensboro, 
North Carolina, proudly 
march in the procession 
at the inauguration of 
President Willa B. Player. 



Bennett College, Greensboro, North Carolina. Bennett College has undergone 
a transition during the year in the death of President Jones and the election of 
Dr. Willa B. Player as president. Dr. Player writes, "Three symbols on the campus 
testify to the life at Bennett College: the college bell, the magnolia trees, and the 
chapel spire. They characterize a way of life which is, indeed, respectful of scholar- 
ship, radiant with beauty, and reverent to God." 

Holding Institute, Laredo, Texas. In the fall of 1955, Holding Institute began 
its second year at the new site, after the flood had destroyed the buildings on the 
old campus. Over 100 young people enrolled, using the new classrooms and cafe- 
torium. One of the residences accommodated a few boys. Of the enrollment, 74 
were Catholics, 26 Methodists, and 7 Baptists. After Religious Emphasis Week, 
conducted by Bishop Rolando Zapata Olivares from the Methodist Church of 
Mexico, the statistics changed. Some Catholics became Methodists. 

The classes, two special English sections and four high-school classes, organized 
and duly elected their officers. The Student Council was elected also. The class in 
communications prepared a weekly column which was published in the local news- 
paper. This same class sponsored the school paper and prepared the annual, The 
Golden Eagle, for publication. The day students participated as never before in 
campus activities. A new bus provides transportation for students, many of whom 
live across- the border. The station wagon also proves to be a valuable asset to 
groups in visiting radio and television stations, art exhibits, and going to church. 
The pupils are proud of their school building. After nine months of use, not a 
pencil mark is found anywhere. 

Several teachers participated in early morning devotions for the boarding stu- 
dents. After the public address system was installed, the school day started with 
a devotional period. 

Methodist Student Center, Greenville, North Carolina. The director writes: 
"The aim of our program this past year was to help our students make their religion 
real and to give serious consideration to the call of our church to full-time Chris- 
tian service. 

"On Sunday mornings, the counselor led in a study series comprising the 
Beatitudes, the Lord's Prayer, the Last Week of Our Lord on Earth, His Resur- 
rection, and His Commission to His Disciples. At Sunday vespers, discussions were 



128 Educational Institutions 

on How to Make Religion Real — through worship, the church, reading, evangelism, 
thinking, service, daily living. The concluding discussion of the series was on the 
question Is the Current Emphasis Upon Religion Real? 

"The call to full-time Christian service was presented by two of our graduates 
now studying at Scarritt College for Christian Workers; a recent graduate now in 
service as a U.S.-2; a pastor from Manila, Philippines, here on a Crusade Scholar- 
ship; and Mrs. W. B. Landrum, field worker, Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

"Eight of our students gave special service this summer: two in a Youth 
Caravan, one in a Drama Caravan, one in the Rio Grande Valley Work Camp; 
and one as counselor in the North Carolina Conference Camp for Youth." 

Methodist Student Center, Tallahassee, Florida. From the director, Rev. Austin 
E. Hollady, comes the following report: "If there is any classified group of individuals 
who cry for a central, motivating force around which they can rally all their scat- 
tered loyalties and allegiances, it is the group of college students who constantly, 
day by day and hour by hour, segment their lives into different areas of interest." 

The objective is to lead each student to an evaluation of the place in, and 
impact of religion on, his life; to lead him to a real and vital commitment to the 
Christian faith that would cause him to pull his religious experience out of the extra- 
curricular and transfer it to the essentials of life. 

Religion and Life seminars were offered during the year with their emphasis 
on the place of religion in answering such campus questions as drinking, dating, 
or cheating. 

"Lest Christian principles become too abstract, service projects were introduced 
to put these new ideas to the test: deputation teams were sent to various churches 
in this district, as well as to the Federal Correction Institution; dolls, made by a 
friend in Thomasville, were sold by the students to raise funds for the Leonard 
Theological Seminary in India; work crews visited churches on weekends to paint 
or clean yards." 

Paine College, Augusta, Georgia. The new president, Rev. E. Clayton Calhoun, 
reports: "The springs of the spirit are kept flowing freely at Paine College. In the 
strict regimen of campus life, in close fellowship of students and faculty, in concert 
with agencies of the church, in centrality of Christian purpose and procedure, a 
force is generated which is conducive to commitment and to Christian growth. 

"The impetus of such spiritual life flows through many tributaries; it is not 
derived from any single source. The careful searcher will find fountainheads of 
spiritual influence in individuals, some quietly behind the scenes; in the policy and 
action of authorized committees of faculty and students; in administrative tone 
and conduct; and in traditions with a long history. 

"A Committee on Religious Life and Work composed of students and faculty 
channels the flow of the Paine College spirit into generative action. 

"A Vocations Conference was held in November under the leadership of Dr. 
Richard G. Belcher of the Interboard Committee on Christian Vocations. 

"The annual Religious Emphasis Week was held in February under the splendid 
and effective leadership of Dr. Richard N. Bender, secretary of the Department of 
Religion in Higher Education of The Methodist Church. Out of it came the organi- 
zation of a Faculty Christian Fellowship." 

Scarritt College for Christian Workers, Nashville, Tennessee. The basic pur- 
pose of Scarritt College for Christian Workers is the preparation of enthusiastic, 
creative, capable, and devoted Christian lay leadership for the church and society. 

This objective is achieved in three ways: 



Department of Work in Home Fields 



129 



1. The educational emphasis at Scarritt College is religious. The courses of 
instruction provide religious, scientific, and historical backgrounds for the under- 
standing of religious truths. The primary concern of the teachers in the classroom 
is that the student reinforce his commitments to the Christian way of fife. What 
happens to the student in the classroom is more important than subject matter as 
such, and the educational philosophy is that the object of our teaching is more 
important than the subject. 

2. In order to insure the growth of students in skills, the field instruction 
program at Scarritt College provides a teaching-learning experience for both faculty 
and students in applying the methods arising out of classroom study to the practical 
situations in churches and in the community. 

3. Campus life at Scarritt College provides for a laboratory for Christian 
living, in which students and faculty cooperate for mutual support and benefit. 
Ordinarily, nearly one-fifth of the student body at Scarritt is composed of young 
people from other countries. 

National College for Christian Workers, Kansas City, Missouri. Students enroll 
in National College for Christian Workers because they have a definite commit- 
ment in mind. They are seeking further growth to fulfill that commitment which 
they made at a summer camp or in their home church. During the four years the 
students have opportunity to hear many leaders of the church in the Anna E. Kresge 
Chapel. These speakers are aware that the students have come to National 
College seeking growth and preparation for service in some phases of church work 
either at home or abroad. The faculty also are conscious of their responsibility in 
providing stimulation for growth. 

Student service for juniors and seniors provides some practical experience in 
order that they may approach their future work with some realization of the task. 
Many have an opportunity to work during the summer in a project of the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service, or in some other agency related to full-time Christian 
service. This practical experience helps to clarify and strengthen their commitment. 

Since the student body at National College is small, every student participates 




A corner of 
the attractive 
library at 
National College 
showing the 
Lucile Sexton 
browsing room 
at far end. 



in numerous activities. The College Choir, which sings at various conference meet- 
ings, the Methodist Student Movement, the International Relations Club, the Drama 
Club, the Athletic Association, the Shield — the college annual — and class activities 
all give opportunity for leadership. 



130 



Educational Institutions 



Vashti School, Thomasville, Georgia. The superintendent, Rev. Woodward 
Adams, writes: "It was a most gratifying year at Vashti School. More than a dozen 
girls qualified for membership in the Beta Honor Society. One sophomore placed 
first in the County and second in the State Oratorical Contest. Her subject was, 
'I Am an American.' Nine of the twelve seniors are already signed up for college 
in September. 

"Religious Emphasis Week this year resulted in many girls making a choice 
for Christ. Many sing in choirs and participate in youth activities. Much interest 
has been aroused in the publication of the school's first annual, The Lady. 

"We strive in every possible way to restore the sense of home and security 
which they have lost. Morning prayers at the table and bedtime devotions create 
an atmosphere in which all that is in between is enveloped by the spirit of Christ 
for all of life." 

Organizational Relationships 

Among the important conferences attended were the Institute on Higher Educa- 
tion held annually in Nashville; the National Fellowship of Indian Workers, a tri- 
ennial conference held at Estes Park, Colorado; and the U.S.-2 Training Program, 
held in 1955 at Scarritt College for Christian Workers. 

The Workers' Conference, held at Clark College, Atlanta, Georgia, in the fall 
of 1955, had a significant theme, "Human Relations," with an emphasis on integra- 
tion. The leadership from the Southern Regional Council was outstanding. 

The first High School Work Camp sponsored by the Board of Education and 
the Woman's Division was held at the Navajo Methodist Mission School in the 
summer of 1955. It proved to be a success as a pioneer venture. 

For the future, we call attention to the third goal of the quadrennial aims of 
the Woman's Division: "To interpret the place of the educational institutions of 
the Woman's Division in the world mission of the church." It is important that 
the objectives of these schools and colleges be made known in this quadrennium. 



RESOURCE MATERIAL 

Christ, the Church, and Race is the 
theme of the 1957-1958 interdenominational 
home mission study. Dr. Liston Pope, Dean of 
the Divinity School, Yale University, is the 
author of the textbook The Kingdom Beyond 
Caste. 

Teachers of this course will find excellent 
resource material in these reports of the execu- 
tive secretaries. Everyone enrolled in a study 
class should know what the Woman's Division 
is doing through its various projects in develop- 
ing interracial and international understanding. 



Department of Work in Home Fields 131 

Social Welfare and Medical Work 

By Emma Burris, Executive Secretary 

SOME SOCIAL WELFARE and medical work may be found in practically every 
field of service in the Woman's Division; but at present 78 projects are 

grouped under the specific designation, Social Welfare and Medical Work. 
Included are children's homes, a few day-care and group-work centers, special 
community services, residences for young businesswomen, retirement homes, vaca- 
tion homes, and hospitals. 

It is not possible to measure the effective services of these institutions in terms 
of a year. However, when children and youth are given nurture and a sense of 
security; when broken bodies are healed through the skill and loving care of Chris- 
tian workers who bring them into a fellowship and knowledge of the Christian way 
of life the influence is continuous and immeasurable. 

As efforts are made to bring the spirit of Christ into all of life, it is recognized 
that the destiny of our world lies in the minds, hearts, and bodies of children. 
Christians must accept the challenge to teach, to guide, and to develop children 
so that they may grow to the fullness of their God-given potential. 

Every child needs love, fun, and adventure; assurance that he is respected; a 
sense of belonging and security; opportunities to develop self-confidence through 
achievement; and positive religious nurture. All children have problems, but those 
from broken homes are subject to emotional disturbances because of the upsets in 
their relationships with their parents. The Methodist Church holds the belief that 
"it is the birthright of every child to have the emotional security of a stable Chris- 
tian home in which there is a normal opportunity for self-development in a creative 
atmosphere." {Discipline of The Methodist Church, 1952, fl2021.) 

Children's Homes 

Fifteen children's homes of the Woman's Division help to meet the needs of 
children who must be cared for outside of their own homes. They are a bulwark 
to families and children in their time of greatest need. During the past year 
emphasis has been placed on improving the standards of care for children in each 
of the homes. This has been clone through the addition of better trained personnel; 
through in-service training programs; and the annual institute sponsored jointly 
by the Woman's Division and the Board of Hospitals and Homes. The publication 
of Standards and Goals for Methodist Children's Agencies in 1956 was the co- 
operative effort of the Board of Hospitals and Homes and the Woman's Division. 
These standards are being implemented by the board and staff of each children's 
home. The trend toward improvement is evident in the following excerpts from 
reports. 

Susannah Wesley Home, Honolulu, Hawaii. Here the Rev. Eugene L. McClure, 
superintendent, the board, and staff are facing courageously and objectively the sit- 
uation involved in a changing program. A careful study, made jointly by the Council 
of Social Agencies and the board and staff of Susannah Wesley, revealed that the 
greatest need in the child-care field in Hawaii was an institution to study emotionally 
disturbed children and to provide care for them. Susannah Wesley Home was ready 
to meet this specific need. The new program has been inaugurated with a profes- 
sional staff of qualified personnel. This pilot project in the Hawaiian Islands should 
do much to improve our service to children. 



132 Social Welfare 

Spofford Home, Kansas City, Missouri. In her report, Mrs. Hester Mary 
Sheneman, the director, says, "Spofford Home is an integral part of the community 
it serves. We work with public agencies and many private ones. In addition to 
our children who live in, we work with the school board by taking some day students 
— children who come to our school only. These children profit by the individual 
treatment received in the classroom and from the psychiatric help of Spofford Home. 
What we are able to accomplish can best be measured in terms of service to these 
children. The staff feels the responsibility for retraining and leading them toward 
a better way of life. Many children return to tell us how much they appreciate 
what we did for them when they lived at Spofford. Some children, even though 
young, appreciate the help received at Spofford while they are here." 

Because the number of residential homes providing treatment and diagnosis 
for emotionally disturbed children is limited, Spofford Home always has a long 
waiting list. 

Jesse Lee Home, Seward, Alaska. Mr. Donn Lee, the director, reports: "How 
to make religion a meaningful experience to our children has been a subject of 
discussion at several staff meetings this past year. We remind ourselves that our 
children are individuals, and we must strive to develop the capacities God has 
given them rather than to cast them into some kind of an institutional mold. We 
are proud of the progress on the third floor in the boy's building, so long in need 
of repair. In the dorm part bunks, drawer, and wardrobe space have been built 
into semiprivate recesses for each boy, leaving a large recreation and study area 
down the center of the room. One of the boys won a Crusade Scholarship, the first 
Alaskan to be selected as a Crusade Scholar. He has been living at Jesse Lee Home 
since he was a little fellow." 

Peek Home, Polo, Illinois. "In caring for rejected children from broken homes," 
writes Mr. Elwin P. Matthews, the director, "our first step is to live with them 
so they may know that adults are not necessarily their enemies. We must show 
them that an adult can love children and accept children's love in return. It is 
rewarding to watch the development of a small boy who once withdrew in fear 
and alarm from the love of a housemother. Children of Peek Home soon find that 
the attentions of love satisfy a need never before met in their life's experiences. 
Their eagerness to receive and return love and their ability to relate to adults soon 
becomes apparent. Our hope is to rehabilitate these youngsters for family-life 
situations. Our aim is to prepare them for adulthood as Christian citizens." 

David and Margaret Home, La Verne, California. Mrs. Cleta Terrill, the 
director, with the standards and goals for Methodist Children's Homes in mind, 
reports: "We have reviewed and evaluated the work of the past year. The deepest 
satisfaction has come from knowing that our goals are true and our standards high, 
even though our reach still exceeds our grasp. Our admission policy has been based 
upon a recognition of the specific needs of children. A child is admitted only after 
the case worker and director have made a careful study of his needs and the family 
situation. We evaluate also our own resources for helping the child and the family. 
Of the 55 children who left us during the year, 33 were returned to one or both of 
their parents and 17 were transferred to foster homes. Religious training is a vital 
part of the program of this home." 

Epworth School for Girls, Webster Groves, Missouri. Miss Elva Lee Perry, 
director for the past fifteen years, states in her report: "At the present time two 
housemothers are taking a course at St. Louis University which is planned especially 
for housemothers in institutions. The service of a housemother is enhanced by 



Department of Work in Home Fields 133 

specialized training, and certainly she will be able to do a more professional job 
if she has the advantages offered by a professional course. The over-all plan of 
Epworth School is to give our girls a feeling of security, some ambition in life, and 
a new faith in God and man." 

Ethel Harpst Home, Cedartown, Georgia. The Rev. Keith Loveless has been 
working to bring about many improvements in the home which will result in better 
facilities for the houseparents and children. Higher standards for houseparents have 
been noted. More of the older children of the home are attending college than 
previously. It is the ambition of the director and staff to create an atmosphere as 
nearly like that of a Christian home as possible. 

Frances DePauw Home, Hollywood, California. Miss Reva McNabb, the 
director, reports: "The girls who live at this home do so because of the opportunity 
it affords Latin-American girls to attend junior or senior high school or junior 
college. Many of them have come from Mexico and South American countries. It 
is important for them to have the training offered by Frances DePauw Home in 
homemaking, music, and Bible study. It is for the Christian influence of this home 
that they are sent by parents, friends, or sponsors." 

Mothers' Jewels Home, York, Nebraska. The administrator, Rev. J. N. Smith, 
has worked with the staff and board to make many improvements in the home and 
farm. The boys' cottage has been completely remodeled, giving the boys and their 
houseparents more space and privacy. The boys gained good experience from 
sharing in the work. A new building for livestock projects is now available for 
those participating in 4-H Club programs and Future Farmers of America. 

Methodist Children's Home of Wyoming Conference, Binghamton, New York. 
Mr. Harold Strong became the administrator of this home in September, 1955. 
With his excellent preparation and experience he has been steadily upgrading the 
program and plant in line with the best methods of child care. Speaking of the 
52 children in this home he says: "These young people come from homes where 
basic needs were not met during their formative years. They are hurt, frustrated, 
and insecure. 

"Real effort has been made to give the staff insight and understanding of this. 
All have worked to bolster the children's morale. Progress has been made in helping 
the youngsters develop skills so that they may compete successfully with other 
children in the community. A well-trained case worker has been added to the staff 
to work closely with the children and their relatives and in cooperation with the 
staff, the church, and other agencies for the best interest of each child's placement." 

Mr. Strong adds: "A well-rounded child welfare program should be looked 
upon as an important evangelistic project. To bring neglected and rejected children 
under the tutelage and influence of the church is the surest way to create a Christian 
community in the next generation." 

Elizabeth A. Bradley Home, Oakmont, Pennsylvania. Mrs. April Schell is 
another new superintendent. There have been many improvements in the home. 
A weekly staff meeting and a weekly family council meeting with the children and 
staff are eagerly anticipated. These council meetings end with a friendship circle 
and prayer. 

SwartzeU Home, Washington, D. C. Miss Pauline Kinsinger replaced Mrs. 
Cora McCann, who retired in May, 1956, as superintendent. A better-trained staff 
is helping to make services more effective in meeting the needs of the children. 

Ruth M. Smith Children's Home, Sheffield, Pennsylvania, serves children from 
Erie Conference who need care outside their own homes. 



134 Social Welfare 

Cunningham Children's Home, Urbana, Illinois. Mrs. Merle English, the super- 
intendent, stresses the importance of the work when she says, "We will continue 
to place the child at the center of our board and staff life and will recall what 
Jesus said: 'Of such is the kingdom of God.' " At Cunningham Home there have 
been many areas of growth — in services to children ; in study of financial structure ; 
in case work services; in staff morale; and in participation by board members. 
Better physical equipment also has been provided. During the year a new cottage 
was erected and dedicated. 

Fifteen children's homes served 920 children during the year 1955-56. 

Residence Halls for Young Business Women 

The Woman's Division of Christian Service sponsors twenty-eight residences 
for young businesswomen in the United States. Every year these residences serve 
approximately 1,280 young women who come to the city for employment. For 
many, this is their first experience away from their day-to-day relationships with 
home and family. It is a crucial time in their lives. Their vital interests during this 
period are in the area of courtship and self-improvement. The needs of this group 
are met through an informal program, the influence of Christian workers, adequate 
living facilities, including date rooms, and opportunities for recreation. A number 
of the residences are interracial and international in character, making broad and 
interesting friendships possible. 

To aid in the accomplishment of a periodic evaluation of these programs, a 
Guide far Residence Self -Appraisal was formulated during an Institute for Board 
and Staff Members of Residences, held at Scarritt College, Nashville, Tennessee, 
June 4-8, 1956. Twenty-four residences and four student dormitories were repre- 
sented by the fifty persons present. The experiences of worship, fellowship, recrea- 
tion, and study contributed to inspire the group to re-examine their purpose and 
work harder to achieve the goals as set forth in paragraph 1166 of the Discipline 
as the Aim of Missions: "... to make the Lord Jesus Christ known to all peoples 
in all lands as their divine Saviour . . . and to bring to bear on all human life the 
spirit and principles of Christ." 

More Rooms Needed. The lack of adequate, supervised housing for employed 
girls continues to be of great concern as girls in greater numbers apply for residence. 
At Iovxl National Esther Hall in Des Moines, Iowa, 143 girls have been housed 
during the year. The capacity has been increased to 83, but many others have 
been turned away. 

Miss Alice Murdock, director of Esther Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, writes: " 'Give 
me wide walls to build my house of life' . . . the unknown poet who wrote these 
words expressed the aim and desire of Esther Hall — to help girls build lives with 
walls of tolerance, love, faith, and hope. Esther Hall has a capacity of 35, but 
because of changes during the year it has served more than 50 different girls. The 
fact that the Hall has been filled to capacity at all times seems to indicate a real 
need for Christian residences for the young, inexperienced girls who come to 
the city." 

The Alma Mathews House in New York City has plans to double its capacity 
by purchasing the adjoining building. Miss Hazel Lovell, who so effectively managed 
the renovating of the present building, is eagerly awaiting the opportunity to remodel 
this new one. This work has a history dating back to 1887 when Methodist women 
became concerned about the young immigrant women who were coming to New 
York in large numbers. Today it serves the needs of young women who come to 
the city from various parts of the United States and foreign lands. 



Department of Work in Home Fields 



135 




International friendships 
are formed at Alma 
Mathews House in New 
York City. 



One of the young women who enjoyed the privilege of living at Alma Mathews 
wrote: "Today you will find Miss Lovell quietly going about her job of maintaining 
a friendly family atmosphere, counseling with the girls, and effectively working 
in the established tradition of meeting the current needs of young women." 

Wilson Inn, with Miss Cecile Davis as director, moved from 3208 East Broad 
Street to 2205 Monument Avenue, Richmond, Virginia, in order to have better 
accommodations and a more adequate program. This change was made after a care- 
ful survey study to determine the long-range need for resident facilities in Richmond 
and the suitability of the new location and building. 

Susannah Wesley Hall, Newport News, Virginia. Miss Pearl Eble, director, 
reports a number of weddings during the year. 

Miss Mary Nichols, Killingsworth Home, Columbia, South Carolina, reports, 
too, that they have had more bridal showers than any other special activity. 

Esther Hall, Ogden, Utah. Miss E. Marie Haass writes: "Our activities have 
centered around small special occasions within our Esther Hall — birthdays, welcoming 
a newcomer with a special cake, celebrating a girl's promotion on the job, or saying 
a reluctant farewell to one we have come to love." 

The House Council is an important factor in a number of the residences. It 
assists the director in planning activities, weighing various matters pertaining to 
the girls, and formulating house rules and regulations. 

Although many more residences are needed in the fast-growing cities of our 
country, the small Friendship Home in Detroit was sold. It was too small to 
operate effectively, and there seemed no possibility of increasing its capacity. 

Esther Halls, Friendship Homes, Community Centers, Cooperative Homes, 
Business Girls' Inn — all seek to meet the needs. Their hopes and aims are embodied 
in the statements by Miss Murdock: "Because there is an Esther Hall these miracles 
have been wrought — 

A young woman has caught a vision of service and is preparing herself to teach 
underprivileged children. 



136 Social Welfare 

A girl has expressed her desire to become a better person, to overcome some 
personal habits which were detrimental to her and to others. 

Another has learned to respect the dignity of others, and has changed from a 
selfish, immature girl into a loving, sharing, happy person. 

A girl who was lonely and discouraged in the wilderness of the city, and who 
was finding undesirable companions, has found love, security, friendship, and happi- 
ness in the happy, homelike atmosphere of Esther Hall." 

Mrs. William S. Stone of Gum Moon Residence Hall and Mrs. W. W. Watts 
of Mary Elizabeth Inn of San Francisco, California, retire at the end of the program 
year. They both feel that their contribution to the work cannot possibly be as great 
as the contribution it has made to their fives. 

Homes for Retired Workers 

New Buildings. In order to be able to meet the needs of the retired deacon- 
esses and missionaries who have faithfully witnessed for Christ for many years, 
plans are under way for a new home to be located in the southern area of the 
United States. Funds toward the building of this new home were raised through 
conference Woman's Societies and presented at the Assembly in Milwaukee in 1954. 
Since then other funds have been added. A committee has made a careful research 
study to determine the best location. 

An infirmary unit is to be built at Robincroft Rest Home in Pasadena, Cali- 
fornia, to serve both Thoburn Terrace and Robincroft. It will be known as Thoburn 
Hall. Many gifts from retired workers and their friends have been received for 
this building. Miss Mabel M. Metzger, director of Robincroft, says, "The family 
has been untiring in their efforts to create interest in the project. Each evening at 
the vesper hour there is a report of gifts that have come in and we sing the 
Doxology for each gift. The strains of Praise God From Whom All Blessings Flow 
are heard almost daily. Our deep gratitude goes out to all who contribute to our 
welfare and comfort." 

Miss Mildred Hewes, director of Thoburn Terrace, Alhambra, California, states : 
"Life at Thoburn Terrace is full. The present is calm because of the feeling of 
security, and also the contributions which each can make to the family living, to 
the church, and to the community. Tomorrow is planned for. God is our strength." 

Bancroft-Taylor Rest Home, Ocean Grove, New Jersey, will have an infirmary 
building, too. Miss Blanche Kemp, director of Bancroft-Taylor, says that every 
day, as members take turns leading morning devotions, someone thanks the heavenly 
Father for the security and loving care found in the home. 

Beulah Rest Home in Oakland, California, has completed its new addition, 
making it possible for more retired people to enter this home. 

The Methodist Home in Salem, Oregon, has plans under way for a new wing 
that will include an infirmary unit. 

Methodist women are continuing to maintain high standards of care for their 
retired workers. 

Special Community Service 

Many of the services rendered by the Woman's Division are classed as special 
community service. Four social workers are engaged in this work : Miss Ruth Gress, 
a social worker among the Chinese in the San Francisco area (among her other 
duties she directs volunteers in teaching English) ; Miss Doris Rhodes in Windham, 
Ohio; Miss Doris Price, a Methodist deaconess in Los Angeles County General 
Hospital; and Miss Martha Almon in Hawaii. 



Department of Work in Home Fields 



137 



Community centers in close proximity to other projects are designated as social 
welfare work. An excellent job is being done by the directors and staffs of the 
following : 

Mothers' Memorial Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Lavinia Wallace Young Community Center, Nome, Alaska 
Rose Gregory Houchen Settlement, El Paso, Texas 
Friendly Center Community House, Toledo, Ohio 

Medical Work 

Medical Work in Alaska. Three hospitals are operated by the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service in Alaska. Maynard-MacDougaU Memorial Hospital in Nome 
treats patients from the entire northwestern section of the territory. About three- 
fourths of the patients are Eskimos from Nome and the remote villages. This hospital 
is dedicated "to serve as a reminder of God's love manifest in man's desire to help 
his fellow man." During the year it was accredited by the Joint Committee on 
Accreditation of Hospitals of the American Medical Association, the first one-doctor 
hospital ever to receive this distinction. 

The Seward Sanatorium and Rehabilitation Center, Bartlett, has established 
a program to give the patient the most help possible. The care and rehabilitation of 
each patient is undertaken by a team of medical, mental health, social welfare, and 
vocational rehabilitation workers. 

The one hundred and fifty beds in the sanatorium are filled. Those who come 
with diseased bodies soon gain hope and a desire to live fully as they begin the 
vocational rehabilitation program with its opportunities for learning many inter- 
esting things, from reading and writing to operating a grocery store or a shoe 
repair shop. 

Seward General Hospital, which has been housed in a remodeled school, is to 
have a new building. It will be owned by the city of Seward, but leased to the 




Doctor and nurse are en- 
couraged by the progress 
of the children at Brew- 
ster Hospital, Jacksonville, 
Florida. 



138 Medical Work 

Woman's Division for a nominal fee. Miss Ruth Murrell, deaconess, is the superin- 
tendent of this hospital where patients all receive TLC — "tender, loving care." 

Hospitals for Minority Groups. The hospitals of the Woman's Division are all 
subject to the Charter of Racial Policies. However, two of the hospitals minister 
chiefly to minority groups. Brewster Hospital, Jacksonville, Florida, serves a large 
Negro population. The services have expanded under the able administration of 
Mr. Jack Whittington, and many more patients are now receiving the benefits of the 
hospital. Funds raised locally, together with Week of Prayer offerings and funds 
from the Ford Foundation, will be used to erect a new building. This will make it 
possible for Brewster to be a teaching hospital for nursing and medical personnel. 

Freeman Clinic and Newark Conference Hospital ministers chiefly to the Latin- 
American families in El Paso, Texas, and along the border. Miss Millie Rickford, 
a deaconess nurse, is the beloved and efficient superintendent. A new addition is 
planned. The high type of Christian service rendered by this agency is correlated 
with the services of the adjacent Houchen Settlement and Day Nursery, and the 
El Buen Pastor Mexican Methodist Church. 

Sibley Hospital, Washington, D. C, has made much progress in its plans and 
fund-raising activities for the new plant to be located on the American University 
campus. This needed new facility will make possible an enlarged and improved 
program for medical care and for the training of nurses. 

Bataan Memorial Methodist Hospital, Albuquerque, New Mexico, has had four 
years of successful service. Mr. James M. Taylor, who replaced Mr. Phil Carter, is 
doing an excellent job as administrator. 

Medical Mission Dispensary continues to serve in the very crowded and needy 
area of north Boston, Massachusetts. 

Holden Memorial Hospital of the Southern Illinois Conference was discontinued 
during this year. 

The Methodist Hospital oj Southern California was owned by the Woman's 
Society of Christian Service of the Southern California-Arizona Conference. This 
has been leased to Los Angeles County and a new building is being erected in 
Arcadia, California. 

Progress 

Throughout this report references are made to new buildings, plans for new 
buildings, and general upgrading of the work. This is as it should be in Christian 
work. The Ford Foundation grants for each of our hospitals have helped to make 
some of these improvements possible. 

Methodist women are making their Christian witness felt that the spirit of 
Christ may be manifested for all of life. 



139 



Town and Country Work 

By Cornelia Russell, Executive Secretary 

WHEREVER the Town and Country worker goes, besides strengthening the 
organizations of the local church, she recognizes and enlists the services of 
every other force working for the uplift of the community. Her goal is to 
make the spirit of Christ effective for all of life in the rural area or small-town 
project to which she has been assigned by the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

One worker writes: "There is no possible way to measure the results of a year 
of service. We only know that God's dreams are for a better way of life for all, and 
that all individuals of His creation have potentialities far beyond human compre- 
hension. This is God's dream. It takes human hands and hearts to fulfill His dream." 

But reports from workers show development in individuals and organizations 
and changes in attitude that can be traced, directly or indirectly, to the presence 
of the Town and Country worker, even though she may modestly disclaim credit. 

From Carol Gibby, Florida Rural Work, we learn that the organization of a 
Woman's Society of Christian Service was finally achieved by a small group of busy 
women from a farming community several miles off the highway. With a little 
encouragement, nearly all the active women members of the church were willing 
to take some office. They planned for their first vacation church school, sending 
the teachers to the district institute; began an additional session for children on 
Sunday evening; and attended 100 per cent two of the workshops of the area. 

Another Florida Rural Worker, Rebecca Moddelmog, points out that one of 
her tasks of the year has been to understand the economic and social problems and 
relationships in each of the six communities she serves. "The economic condition 
of the small farmer is a very real reason for the condition of the small churches, 
many of which are giving up the struggle because the people have become discour- 
aged. The Farm Bureau and the federal government are working on the situation, 
which seems to be part of a national problem. The tendency is toward forcing the 
small farmer out and developing agriculture on a large scale. The year has been 
very hard because of the long drought and the high consumer prices. But an aban- 
doned church was torn down and the materials used by the men to add four 
Sunday-school rooms, a kitchen, and a larger room as well to their own building. 
At another church all the lovely stained-glass windows were repaired and other 
improvements made by the men, while the women served dinner." 

"Many of the people are taking more initiative," writes Violet Guinn, a North 
Alabama Rural Worker. "Realizing the necessity of a room for each class in the 
church school, they are expanding their buildings. The women attend more district 
and zone meetings. They teach most of their own studies. There is an increase 
in giving to missions. The superintendents and teachers in the church school are 
better qualified than last year. Each church had a well-attended vacation church 
school, with teachers who planned their own work." 

An interesting account of a doll library comes from Mrs. Robert Schmeer, 
Hollywood Community Center, Pennsylvania: "Fifty washable, unbreakable dolls 
from twenty home towns have joined our Doll Library. Each doll lives in its own 
shoe box, along with an elaborate wardrobe labeled with the doll's name on each 
garment. For many a little girl in the coal-mining community, this is the only 
opportunity she has to dress a doll. Home visits for the dolls are limited to a week, 
and any young mother may assume the responsibility — with the understanding that 
two cents per day for overtime must be paid." 
In telling about the closing session of a demonstration church-school lesson, 



140 Town and Country 

Amanda Sarah Pleasant, Lexington Larger Parish, Virginia, says: "The small boy 
upon whom I called for a sentence prayer was very bashful. He was too timid at 
first to come to the front, but he did, and gave the prayer. Later he said to me, 
'That is the first time anyone has called on me to pray. I don't say my prayers at 
night, either.' Recently he told me, T feel so much better now that I have been 
taught to pray. I don't get angry when the boys call me "preacher" and "goody." 
I know if God is for us, nobody can be against us.' " Among other accomplishments 
of the year, three are cited — Woman's Societies fully organized for the first time; 
the Methodist Youth Fellowship prayer groups (they hold one each month in 
members' homes and with sick persons of the communities) ; a demonstration 
church-school lesson given in every church but one. 

Adjustments in programs are necessary according to Mary Beth Littlejohn, 
South Carolina Rural Worker, who relates her experience: "Not all groups can fit 
into the same pattern. Some are original enough and eager enough to alter the 
pattern to fit the requirements. In a 'non-farm' or 'part-farm' rural area, the chief 
source of income for most of the families is industrial employment. Hence working 
hours become the determining factor for the time of all meetings. One Guild and 
one Society meet on Sunday afternoon, because some members work on one shift 
and some on another. 

" T know I can't do too good a job at it. Lots of folks could do it better, and 
maybe I can next year. But I just want to help the children love the Lord better.' 
This was the reply of the mother of a large family to the discouraging remarks of 
a fellow church member who felt incapable of teaching in a vacation church school. 
She read the text from cover to cover before the half-day institute and prepared 
as best she could from day to day while the school was in session. A pianist was not 
available, so this mother listened to someone else play the songs and kept practicing 
until she could play them acceptably. She is willing to pay a high price for continuing 
growth in the ability to serve." 

Mary E. Chaffin, North Arkansas Rural Worker, writes: "In one little village 
the Methodist and Cumberland Presbyterian churches are together. They had no 
woman's organization. When a meeting of the women was called to discuss the 
possibility of organizing, they didn't think much of the idea. I asked them to go 
home and 'talk to the Lord' about the matter. One of the leading women replied, 
'I'm afraid to. He might be in favor of it!' Two months later, as she led the prayer 
group, she told how much the Woman's Society had already meant to her. There 
are so many activities in the Society that one husband said he would either have 
to rent a room in town or lose a crop because he had to bring his wife to so many 
meetings." 

Emergency Aid 

A rural worker must be observant and tactful, as Gladys Newcomb, Holston 
Valley Rural Work, knows: "During the past year I came to know a mother who, 
without the material things we think necessary, makes a happy home for her ten 
children, teaching them honesty and cleanliness of mind and body. I was concerned 
about the four-months-old baby, who was so thin and lifeless that I suggested taking 
her to a doctor. The mother hesitated, made excuses, and then said, 'Well, you 
know that would take money, and we just don't have it.' However, we went to the 
doctor several times, and I got the county nurse to visit and advise the mother. 
When times became better I was reimbursed for some of the doctor bills, but seeing 
the beautiful, plump baby as she is today is big pay." 

Mrs. Mabel Hamilton, Alpine Community Center, Texas, adds a word about 
welfare: "We discovered a child in one group who had a badly enlarged knee. She 



Department of Work in Home Fields 



141 



was checked by our local doctors, and the diagnosis showed the knee was tubercular. 
Through the State Board of Health and with contributions from the Lions' Club 
and several others she was hospitalized and is now having excellent care. Glasses 
have been secured for many. In fact, since there is no public welfare worker or 
health nurse, our Center has become the clearing house for welfare problems." 

Mildred Ralston, Ozona Community Center, Texas, gives a testimony about 
concerns for neighbors: "For the first time in the history of this Latin community, 
a health nurse was available this past year. She found an appalling amount of 
poor eyesight among the children, some of it due to malnutrition. She was able to 
give free vitamin tablets to the most undernourished children. Since the close of 
school this ministration has been carried on by the Community House, with the 
help of the Mothers' Club, another evidence of a growing concern among these 
women for their neighbors. During a call in a home where there was a little girl 
who was to benefit from the continued vitamin distribution I was pleased to hear 
the older sister remark, 'Things are getting better all the time. People are doing 
so much more for each other!' " 

Widening Concerns 

Bessie Van Scyoc, McCrum Community House, Pennsylvania, reports action 
from study: "A group of women in a small mining community studied Within Tux) 
Worlds. As a result the group sent a request to the representative of the county 
that he sponsor a bill for the Colorado River Project. This was the first time the 
women had done anything like this. They were elated when the reply came that 
the representative would vote for the bill, and when it was passed they felt that 
they had had a real part in a great project." 

A Southwest Missouri Rural Worker also saw evidences of action, she says: 
"An enthusiastic young girl came back from a Methodist Youth Fellowship Juris- 
dictional Workshop and inspired the youth of her county to undertake the Fall 
Action Project, "Toward Christian World Community." A dramatic program at 
the subdistrict meeting pointed up the desperate needs of the world's people, and 
specific projects were outlined for local youth. These young people did not just 
go home and talk about the toll of tuberculosis in India or the illiteracy of Africa. 
They got to work. Some groups made sacrificial offerings, and every group packed 
boxes of warm clothing for the Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief." 

Grace Thatcher, West Kentucky Rural Work, gives a report on U.N. work- 




A rural worker 
encouraged a 
Methodist church 
to sponsor a 
news-writing 
clinic. 



142 Town and Country 

shops: "In Western Kentucky 202 persons attended United Nations Workshops 
planned by the subdistrict Woman's Society of Christian Service, singing 'Little 
U. N. Songs' and studying about technical assistance, UNICEF, and specialized agen- 
cies, as well as the general organization of the United Nations." 

County Services 

More and more church and community workers are helping the churches to 
avail themselves of the service provided by county agencies. Many projects whose 
activities embrace practically a whole county have discovered the advantages of 
a County Council of Methodist Churches or a subdistrict Woman's Society of Chris- 
tian Service. Other projects, even if they do not have the opportunity to cooperate 
in such a council, may call upon the county health and welfare departments, the 
government extension services, civic groups, and public schools, to help the commu- 
nity in various ways. For instance, Anne McKenzie, Middle Tennessee Rural Work, 
writes : 

"A County Council of Churches formed in Wayne County, Tennessee, meets 
monthly to study their common problems and make plans for meeting them. On 
Rural Life Sunday the first county mass meeting of Methodists was held. In the 
fall of 1955 the first interdenominational World Day of Prayer observance in this 
area was conducted. The council and the rural worker cooperated with the County 
PTA Council in support of an appropriation for a county library. This will also 
include library stations in the various communities, through Regional Library Service. 

Cooperation with other county agencies is presented by Lois Marquart, South- 
west Missouri Rural Work: "In one county, 4-H Sunday was observed for the first 
time in local churches. It was held on Rural Life Sunday and the program appeared 
on the inside of an attractive Soil Stewardship bulletin, supplied by the Soil Con- 
servation Service. At Lord's Acre dedication services and at family night gatherings 
Soil Conservation agents assisted, showing slides of soil-saving practices in the 
county. The county Home Agent has been helpful as a member of the Rural 
Executive Committee. He has given valuable advice to a church desiring to remodel 
a parsonage; to two churches planning to paint interiors; and to another planning 
for a kitchen." 

Locally 

There is local cooperation, too. Lillian Ellis, Metcalfe Community House, Penn- 
sylvania, says that the high school lent pole-vaulting equipment to the community 
center boys for summer practice. A Greek Catholic friend hauled sawdust in his 
truck, free of charge, to make a landing spot. And the YMCA has helped in many 
ways. 

"One of our board members is offering her mountain cabin for a month this 
summer. I plan to take small groups there for camping experience for a few days 
at a time, one group each week. It will help these children, who need to get away 
from home even for a few days, to know there is something and somebody else in 
the world. . . . Our enrollment in clubs this year has risen rapidly, especially of boys, 
since we again had a boys' worker. Those through twelve years have come in such 
numbers that Mr. Cunningham has twice divided club groups, in order to give 
them some craft work," reports Lulu B. Bryan, Neighborhood House, California. 

Men of the community have been giving time to play Softball with the boys 
from broken families who are among the children at MacDonell Methodist Center, 
Houma, Louisiana. 



Department of Work in Home Fields 



143 



"Getting to Know You" 

When the Southwest Texas Conference Woman's Society of Christian Service 
held its annual meeting in San Marcos, the members were entertained at tea at the 
Southside Community Center. In the receiving line to greet the guests were mem- 
bers of the executive board of the center, the president of the Latin-American 
Woman's Club, the chairman of the Latin-American Boy Scout Troop Committee, 
and several other Latin leaders. The guests then entered the large recreation room, 
where teen-age boys were boxing and wrestling in one corner; in others younger 
boys were tumbling; Scouts were demonstrating their crafts, and some of the young 
people were folk dancing. Others were cooking in the kitchen. The workshop was 
full of boys. The kindergarten children were in full display. Some of the young 
adult men were parking the cars. Upstairs the guests were served coffee and tea 
by the young Latin-American mothers, beautiful and gracious. Members of the 
board introduced the guests to different phases of the work in progress in other 
rooms. 

Later, Mary Riddle of the Southside Community Center reported: "In letters 
I have received and during visits since that open house, the women agree that, as 
they talked to the Spanish-speaking people, they really came to understand what 
the Community center was. An eighteen-year-old boy who had been in the boxing 
group and also served as host said, 'Miss Riddle, I would have sweated out every 
drop of blood in my body to let those women know what this place means to me and 
how much I love it.' " 

Mrs. May E. Wesley, Indian Mission Cooperative Work, Oklahoma, reports 
changes and progress: "Ten years ago we used all white leaders and had to have 
interpreters for each tribe. Now we are proud that we use all Indian leaders and 
teachers in our coaching schools. The Woman's Society of Christian Service sur- 
passes all other organizations of the Indian Mission. Two years ago a secretary of 
Supply Work was added. The quilting bee, a source of spiritual happiness to the 
women, is being revived. Each quilting day is started with a prayer for guidance 
and a special request for the solving of problems in the church or in their personal 
lives." 

Eleanore Hickok, Cherokee Indian Mission, North Carolina, also notes progress: 
"The Cherokee Indians are eager to contribute toward the erection of a much- 
needed church in the Big Cove area of the reservation, but they have little cash. 
The 'Exchange Building' gives them a center for the sale or barter of the used 




Young people of 
the Dulac Indian 
Mission look for- 
ward to the en- 
riching programs. 



clothing sent by church groups as a result of the study of the Indian American. 
Craft work is bartered for clothing, and the proceeds are given for the new church. 
By the same means the conference Board of Missions was repaid the money they 



144 Town and Country 

lent to erect the Exchange Building. The Exchange provides employment also for 
many, and our people are better and more appropriately dressed than ever before." 

Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Pittman, Mississippi Rural Center, Mississippi, report on 
cooperative effort: "One of the most significant activities of the year was Career 
Day, held in cooperation with the schools of the county. The theme was 'The Way 
to Better Jobs.' The objectives were: (1) to help students make sound decisions 
relative to getting jobs; (2) to provide opportunity for them to meet and talk with 
college representatives concerning educational opportunities; (3) to help them 
prepare for life adjustments in a changing world and gain information concerning 
new fields. In the schools for Negroes there is no person trained to give this kind 
of guidance to students at any level of development. Comments showed it was 
worth while: 'This day has helped me to make up my mind.' T never knew there 
were so many things I could choose to do.' Six students have applied for and received 
scholarships to attend college. We plan a follow-up and to make it an annual event." 

Martha Home, Valley Institute, Texas, sees the great possibilities in her work: 
"The Latin- American children have learned a great deal of English in the kinder- 
garten, not only words but concepts that will help them face the problems of the 
public school. 'One ball, Mees,' is the plea that frequently has to be answered on 
the playground. Even the youngest quickly learn the English for ball. 'Don't you 
have a club for us?' is another frequent request from both junior and senior high 
boys. The challenge is great. As one little one announced at a puppet show: 'Next 
— the commercial: Jesus Loves the Little Children!'" 

Another Coordinator 

During the past year Miss Addie Mae Jamieson has been serving as coordinator 
for the North and South Georgia Rural Work, which includes seven different areas. 
Miss Jamieson describes her job as (a) listening, sharing the workers' joys and dis- 
appointments; (b) encouraging them in times of stress and need; (c) interpreting 
the best methods and skills that she knows to help reach people for Christ; and 
(d) sharing with others her faith, hope, and love for God and mankind. She 
reports increased cooperation between the workers and the women of the two con- 
ferences. Rural work is gaining more recognition and appreciation. The coordinator 
receives many invitations to speak at various district and annual conference meet- 
ings and on college campuses. 

A Project Transferred 

McCarty Community House, Cedartown, Georgia, has been transferred to 
Social Welfare and Medical Work, because it is now housed in the education unit 
of the chapel building on the grounds of the Ethel Harpst Home. While the deter- 
mining factor in making this change was the urgent need for a new building, a recent 
survey disclosed that many more people would be served in the new location. 

Special Summer Work 

In the summer of 1955 eighteen college students served from six to ten weeks 
in Town and Country projects across the country. In 1956 there were twenty-nine, 
including four of last summer's group. Moreover, five of the 1955 students are now 
serving full time in rural projects. Three of them are U.S.-2's, and two are deaconess 
candidates. Two of the 1956 summer workers are serving already as U.S.-2's. 

"I loved every minute of it," concluded one of the girls, after listing many 
duties and activities. "I found myself giving devotionals, teaching Sunday-school 



Department of Work in Home Fields 



145 



classes, going to all the circle and Woman's Society meetings when I had time; 
making church announcements; drawing posters; mimeographing; phoning; paint- 
ing; making unexpected speeches; sweeping; moving furniture; running the filmstrip 
machine; playing the piano; singing in the choir; or hurrying to the newspaper 
office. There were days when I thought I would never finish all my work. I would 
rush home; then rush back for council meetings, swimming parties, wiener roasts, 
or choir practice . . . and I loved every minute of it!" 

Vacation church schools took much of the time of the summer workers. For 
some of the children, the vacation school was their only opportunity for Christian 
education, no Sunday church school being available. The greatest contribution of 
these workers, however, came not through the actual teaching of classes, but through 
their help to the leaders and teachers in planning for the schools, and through their 
suggestions for new methods and materials. 

Youth Activities Week with the senior Methodist Youth Fellowships, and 
Christian Adventure Week with intermediates, Family Nights, serving as counselors 
in intermediate and senior camps, coaching dramatizations, leading group singing, 
conducting group recreation (hay rides, swimming, skating, bowling, "hobo" parties, 
wiener roasts, game nights, fun nights, and just plain picnics) were among the 
other activities of the students. This work program was planned and carried out 
under the general direction of the rural worker and a committee including ministers 
and rural work advisory committee members. 

A vacation church school was held in a community that had never had one 
before and whose church school consisted of one adult class, attended by any chil- 
dren or young people who might come. "After a week of this school," wrote the 
student, "we had the usual church-school program, in which the children and young 
people participated, demonstrating what they had learned and accomplished during 
the week. After the program we took the children outdoors for church school. When 
we left, the people of the church actually got down on their knees and cried and 
prayed to God to forgive them for neglecting their children and young people." 




Handcraft keeps hands 
and minds busy in cre- 
ative activities. 



146 

Urban Work 

By Mabel Garrett Wagner, Executive Secretary 

DOES THE CHURCH-RELATED settlement house or community center fit 
into the home mission study for the year: Mission Field: U.S.A.? Project 
directors under the Woman's Division of Christian Service have the answers. 
One says, "Were it not for my belief that the work at our settlement house is God's 
work, I would not have continued at times. But I felt I could do no less than my 
best despite the pressures of the moment." 

A U.S.-2 worker reports that there was added responsiveness to devotionals 
during Mothers' Club meetings. As a result, several boys and girls started going to 
church school for the first time in their lives. Another U.S.-2 worker describes a 
camping incident: "The path was dark, and the woods unfamiliar to girls from the 
city. At the water's edge they sang a hymn to close their worship. On the way 
back the path was just as dark, the noises just as loud, but with calmness and inner 
peace one girl put her hand into that of the worker, saying, T was afraid on the 
way down to the lake, but now I'm not!' These are the things which make settlement 
work satisfying in the name of Christ." 

"My impression of a church-related settlement house," writes the new director 
of Kingdom House in St. Louis, Missouri, "is that it stands on three solid pillars — 
Christian faith and ethics, the concepts of social work, and the principles of demo- 
cratic life. We must try to improve living conditions and human relations, serving 
all our neighbors and working with them to build a better community in which all 
may attain a full and wholesome life. Opportunity is present as never before in 
history. Our prayer to God is that he grant us wisdom, grant us courage, and that 
we fail not man nor Him." 

In a midwestern city of nearly four million people, on the shores of Lake 
Michigan, Marcy Center serves the north Lawndale area of Chicago, Illinois. Per- 
centage-wise the 1950 area population of 100,489 and the 1955 figure of 110,000 
indicate not only an increase in numbers but something even more interesting: 

1950 1955 

White (Jewish) 85% 13% 

Negro 12% 87% 

Others 3% 

Through the doors of Marcy Center, typical of many agencies under the 
Woman's Division, thousands of people enter yearly, seeking different kinds of 
services. Some come for counsel and advice; some to participate in civic groups; 
some to attend nursery school; some for care at medical and dental clinics; some 
to attend English, citizenship, and various other adult classes; and some to take 
part in after-school activities. During 1955-56 more than 2,060 people took part 
in these various events from one to five times a week. 

Bethlehem Center in Nashville, Tennessee, conducts its work in the democratic 
Christian tradition. The program is designed to help people live together har- 
moniously ; to enrich the lives of members by providing experiences through which 
their interests and abilities may develop; to aid individuals, including volunteers, to 
develop a sense of responsibility; to enable members to strive for better neighbor- 
hood and community living conditions; and to cooperate with educational institu- 
tions in providing experiences for students. 

Other agencies have similar goals. Bethlehem Community Center in Columbia, 



Department of Work in Home Fields 



147 



South Carolina, includes a few not already mentioned: to help each member feel 
he is important as an individual ; to encourage church attendance and affiliation ; to 
work toward a family-centered program; and to promote membership participation 
in neighborhood, city, state, national, and world affairs. 

According to the teacher, "When kindergarten opened, there were a few 
selfish children who wanted to play with everything, but not to share with others. 
Through the program they have learned something of sharing and have come to 
some understanding of Jesus' love for all children." "So many nice people have done 
so many nice things for us." Thus a kindergarten child expressed her thanks. 

South Carolina has no compulsory school law, and the House Council of Beth- 
lehem Center became concerned about the numbers of school-age children playing 
on the streets during school hours. Plans have been formulated by the high-school 
principal and the House Council to provide experiences that will awaken a desire 
for better living and that will help motivate teen-agers to attend school regularly. 

Religion Basic in Community Centers 

People not only need to work and play, they need opportunity to worship. 
At the heart of Bethlehem Center in Memphis, Tennessee, is a lovely little chapel, 
used by individuals and groups. 

After a worship service for the Latin-American, Anglo, and Negro children of 
Bethlehem Center, Dallas, Texas, held in the chapel of a local church, an eleven- 
year-old said, "Oh, it was so beautiful. I just felt that God was right there." On a 
few occasions some Bethlehem Center groups have shared interracial experiences 
with children of some church schools in the city. This has meant much to them. 

It is heart-warming to hear parents say, as they have to the staff at Bethlehem 
Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, "I want my child to grow up in the 
Bethlehem Center way and have the wonderful experiences and fellowship and love 
that I found there as a child." 

From Centenary Methodist Community Center in Nashville, comes a report 
of another type of service which reflects definite concern for the spiritual needs of 




Worship is an integral part of commu- 
nity center programs for young and old 
alike . . . Methodist Community House, 
Grand Rapids, Michigan. 



The creative urge starts early and 
should be carefully nurtured . . . kinder- 
garten at Wesley Community House, 
Key West, Florida. 



148 Urban Work 

the community. A worker from the center has charge of weekly noontime worship 
services at the Werthan Bag Factory. These services were started over forty 
years ago at the request of the factory workers. The management has cooperated by 
installing a loudspeaker system. Ministers from churches of all denominations are 
invited to speak. 

St. Paul said, "For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate." 
(Romans 7:15, R.S.V.) That is also the cry of many in our day. The director of 
Wesley Community House in Key West, Florida, states the problem very clearly. 
He says, "People seek sources of spiritual and moral power. They crave and reach 
out toward the higher life. There are good influences as well as bad ones in every 
community. The church-related community center stands in the midst of the good 
and the bad, seeking to help right the wrongs and improve that which can be 
improved." 

This conversation was overheard recently in the kindergarten. Sylvia to Mike: 
"Everybody ought to love God. He made the world." Mike, seriously and emphati- 
cally: "I do love God." Sylvia: "You ought to love Jesus, too, because he is God's 
son." Mike, just as seriously: "I do love Jesus." Sylvia, coming to the point: "You 
ought to try hard to be a good boy, then." Mike, slowly: "I do try hard, but when 
I get mad I forget." Sylvia replied: "I'll try to remember to remind you next time." 

In a handcraft group someone will say, "What did you make?" In cooking 
class, "What did you learn?" On the basketball court, "How many games did you 
win?" In all such activities there are opportunities for right decisions and for the 
influence of a skilled and dedicated leader to guide and help children as they play, 
live, and work together. 

The evening program director at South Side Settlement in Columbus, Ohio, 
tells about a boy accused of stealing: "The accused and accusers sat down with 
the leader to talk it over. The kids left and I didn't know whether what was said 
would do any good. I didn't know who, if anyone, had stolen the money! But 
half an hour later John came back. He had given the five dollars to the boy from 
whom he had taken it. God must have been somewhere around because John didn't 
get beaten up!" 

Programs in any number of community centers have been planned particularly 
to point up spiritual values and personal relationships. The boys who make up 
one group at St. Mark's Community Center in New Orleans, Louisiana, are of 
Mexican, Filipino, Italian, German, and French descent. But what difference does 
that make? They are all Americans together, just teen-agers. They have the same 
hopes and desires, the same problems as other teen-agers, but in some instances 
more difficult ones because of family conditions. They have great need for fellow- 
ship and understanding. Such a group as this needs a good leader with a warm 
personality and high ideals, who can help boys realize that he has genuine concern 
for them. 

Jeff was hard to reach. It seemed as if no one could get under his skin. The 
leader reached him by calling at his home. Jeff was touched that anyone would 
be so interested in him. His attitude has changed toward everyone. Now he even 
feels free to laugh and joke. It is fun to see his face light up with the feeling of 
security that seems to say, "I belong, I am accepted. I can relax and be myself." 

And so one could go on. Each child has some special need. They must learn 
to appreciate each other; to develop the ability to think, to plan, and to take 
responsibility ; and to realize the brotherhood of man and the fatherhood of God. 
These are the children who will be the citizens of tomorrow. What can be more 
important than this? 



Department of Work in Home Fields 



149 




Bethlehem Community Center in Au- 
gusta, Georgia, was cited by McCall's 
Magazine for sponsoring a neighbor- 
hood cleanup campaign which benefited 
the entire community. 



The Well Baby Clinic at Wesley Settle- 
ment House, Knoxville, Tennessee, is 
manned by public health nurses, in- 
terns from City Hospital, and volunteers. 



Developing Neighborhood Leadership 

The development of leadership among participants in settlement house pro- 
grams as well as among the people in the neighborhood is fundamental to our basic 
philosophy. From Moore Community House in Biloxi, Mississippi, comes the 
report that many more young people are taking an active part in the life of the 
neighborhood church. One young man is training to become a medical missionary. 
Two young women are in nurses' training, two in teacher training, and two others 
are planning for full-time Christian service. One can look over neighborhoods almost 
anywhere and meet individuals who have found Christ and a means of serving 
Him because of the influence of a community center and its consecrated deaconesses 
and other workers on their everyday lives. 

The influence of a community center or settlement house and the interest its 
program inspires are pointed up dramatically by the following illustrations. One 
of our directors had his first experience with the work as a kindergarten youngster 
attending a center sponsored by the Woman's Division. During the twenty-fifth 
anniversary celebration at Bethlehem Center in Spartanburg, South Carolina, a 
high-school teacher spoke in appreciation of what the center had meant to him in 
his boyhood. Other projects can point to second-generation children now attending 
program activities just as their parents did before them. Those parents now serve 
on the committees and boards of these centers. 



Services to Individuals, Families, and Groups 

Each community center and settlement house concentrates the major portion 
of its program on services to people interested in creative activities, hobbies, ath- 
letics, recreation, and other group activities. Such groups are organized to serve 
boys and girls, teen-agers, adults, and Golden Agers. They give the individual an 
opportunity for proper and satisfying experiences so that he may grow and develop 
according to Christian democratic living. 

Many such opportunities are offered at Bethlehem Center in Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. The director says, "The worker is concerned not only with the skill being 
developed, but with the way in which it can help the individual in his adjustment 
to life. The major focus in clubs is on personal relationships, with members develop- 



150 Urban Work 

ing their own programs and playing responsible roles in carrying through the demo- 
cratic decisions made by the group. Members have opportunity for self-expression ; 
to satisfy their need for belonging; to gain the respect of their peers; and to 
develop a true sense of values." 

People Are Our Business 

Whether a very small club or a mass activity like roller skating is involved, 
each community center has a primary belief in the ability and worth of each indi- 
vidual based upon Christ's teachings — the belief that each individual has the right 
to full development of his own capacities, and that there must be a concern for the 
individual, the family, the neighborhood, and the wider community. Each project 
of the Woman's Division stands dedicated to Christian activities and, as the goal of 
Bethlehem Center in Chattanooga, Tennessee, expresses it, "to strive in every 
aspect of its activities to serve the Master through aiding its neighbors to find and 
lead a Christian life." So the social group worker must be "one who enables various 
types of groups to function in such a way that both group interaction and program 
activity contribute to the growth of the individual and the achievement of desirable 
social goals. Our primary concern is people, for people are our business." 

Because of this, the need for consecrated full-time Christian workers is pointed 
up with urgent significance. The report from Bethlehem Center in Nashville indicates 
that "the value of each individual as a person is of prime concern. The center's 
friendly concern for all its members and their problems must make it a neighbor 
to all. Some member of the staff who is looked upon as a personal friend is always 
available. Whether the problem is a mother's concern for her delinquent son; an 
unmarried mother's anxiety for her baby's welfare; a boy's inability to see the 
need for continuing school when he gets little encouragement at home; a neighbor's 
grief over the loss of a loved one; or the problems that come with the golden years 
of life — Bethlehem Center is interested and cares." 

Special Groups Served in the U.S.A. 

Classes for the Handicapped : "We have Bible classes in Braille for the blind 
at Bethlehem House, Birmingham, Alabama. The only class in Birmingham for 
Negro children requiring speech correction is sponsored by the State Crippled Chil- 
dren Service and meets at our center. This fall there will be a class for deaf Negro 
children, the first in the state." 

English and Citizenship Classes: Classes in conversational English and Spanish 
for adults have been organized at Good Neighbor Settlement House in Brownsville, 
Texas. "More students come almost every clay asking for 'The School to Learn 
English.' They are grateful for this opportunity to overcome a language handicap. 
Citizenship classes are also conducted for those trying to get their papers." 

Old-Timers Group: "Ranging in ages from sixty to one hundred and two years, 
fifty-five members of the Old-Timers Group at Newberry Avenue Center in Chicago, 
Illinois, meet regularly for fellowship and recreation. An increasing number of the 
aged living in the neighborhood are participating in this program. Susie Smith, who 
celebrated her one hundred and second birthday last Christmas, continues to be 
active." 

Puerto Rican Newcomers: Miami Latin Center, Florida, located in a city that 
has the second largest influx of Spanish-speaking people into the United States, has 
opportunity to pioneer in serving these new neighbors. "They are seeking freedom 
from poverty, oppression, and lack of opportunity," writes the director. "We offer 



Department of Work in Home Fields 



151 



them the larger freedoms of Christian brotherhood and democracy through the 
facilities of our center. They need help in adjusting to a new environment, a new 
language, and a new way of life before they can become integrated as responsible 
citizens of this city, able to contribute to the building of God's kingdom." 

In New York City the Woman's Division of Christian Service has a special 
worker among Puerto Rican children. 

ISetc Buildings and Improvements 

Because of changing conditions, Bethlehem Center in Dallas, Texas, has moved 
to new, remodeled quarters. A city-wide committee of the Council of Social Agencies 
recommended the new location which is within two blocks of a large elementary 
school and a housing project. 

Several years ago a Wesley Community House program was organized in an 
inadequate one-room building without running water in Phoenix, Arizona. This 
was in a low-income neighborhood. During the past year an attractive building 
with adequate playground space was completed near two public schools. 

Through the 1955 Week of Prayer offerings a new building for BeMehem Cen- 
ter, Charlotte, North Carolina, is now being completed. The move became necessary 
because of a projected highway and business developments around the former area. 
In cooperation with the Council of Social Agencies, a study was made which led to 
the erection of this new building near two housing projects. Deep gratitude is 
expressed to women over the country who gave so generously to the Week of Prayer 
offering. 

Some of the 1955 Week of Prayer offering will be used also to build a recreation 
addition to the present Bethlehem Center at Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Recent 
city plans call for a new highway which will go through the present property. A 
careful study is being made to secure the proper new location. 

In Atlanta, Georgia, a Bethlehem Community Center building, made possible 
by Crusade funds, was dedicated this fall. Two locations were secured and aban- 
doned on the advice of the Metropolitan Planning Commission before the present 
site on the campus adjoining Gammon Theological Seminary was chosen. With 
several new housing projects and new public school buildings nearby, the center is 
now in the midst of a large and growing population. 

For many years Campbell Friendship House, in thickly populated, highly indus- 



Book Week at Campbell 
Friendship House in Gary, 
Indiana, evoked great in- 
terest on the part of neigh- 
borhood children. 




152 Urban Work 

trialized Gary, Indiana, felt the need of a gymnasium. This spring their dream was 
realized through some funds raised locally and others received from the Woman's 
Division. 

Change of Work 

In June, 1956, the Silver Lake Community Center in Providence, Rhode Island, 
was closed. The conference Woman's Society asked that support be transferred to 
the Methodist Service Center in the same city, which was opened in July in a new 
housing project. 

At the request of the conference Woman's Society, funds that had been used for 
Mt. Vernon Place Community Center in Baltimore, Maryland, were transferred to 
Broadway-East Baltimore Parish Project, located in a rapidly growing area, for a 
two-year experimental period. 

Because of changing needs, the conference Woman's Society requested re- 
allocation of funds from three of the institutional Methodist churches in Chicago 
to Marcy Center and Newberry Avenue Center. 

Institutes 

An Institute for Board Presidents and Directors was held May 28 to June 1, 
1956, at National College for Christian Workers in Kansas City, Missouri. Forty- 
four board members, fifty-five urban workers, and nineteen leaders, totaling 118, 
attended the institute. 

Miss Margaret Young has met in consultation and held institutes with local 
board and staff members of a number of community centers. 

In All of Life 

Perhaps seventy-year-old Mrs. Ramos, a Golden Ager at Wesley Community 
House in San Antonio, Texas, and a volunteer worker for years, expresses our spirit 
and motives most succinctly, "We should give thanks to God for giving us the 
opportunity of living in this great country and for being able to come to Wesley 
House where these wonderful people treat us with so much kindness and affection. 
We should ask God's blessing on Wesley House." It is not the dramatic or spectacular 
incident but the day-by-day contact and routine which help build the kingdom of 
God into the lives of people. 

There are strange ways of serving God; 
You sweep a room or turn a sod, 
And suddenly, to your surprise, 
You hear the whir of seraphim, 
And find you're under God's own eyes 
And building palaces for him. 

Service, by Herman Hagedorn 



Department of Christian Social Relations 

Strides in science have accelerated changes in patterns of living in 
all lands. Peoples everywhere are demanding freedom, justice, and the 
abundant life for all. This report bears witness to our endeavors to 
develop greater understanding. It also challenges us to make our way 
of life bear witness to this understanding — in the spirit of Christ. 

Mrs. J. Fount Tillman, Chairman 



Report of the Secretaries 

Thelma Stevens, Executive Secretary 
Margaret R. Bender, Associate Secretary; Ethel L. Watkins, Associate Secretary 

I. We Build on the Past 

rE MUST build on the past — but we must live in the present with a weather 
eye eternally focused on the future. In the context of this philosophy this 
annual report is written. This is the last year of the fourth quadrennium in 
the history of the Department of Christian Social Relations. A look at our world 
during the year 1955-56 reflects patterns, practices, and problems that have, to a 
greater or lesser degree, clouded or brightened our horizons since the birth of the 
Woman's Society of Christian Service in 1940. It may be well to refresh our memory 
by listing a few events of this current year that have world significance, and therefore 
a vital relation to the program of the department. 

1. In 1955 the United Nations celebrated its tenth birthday. The importance 
of this celebration recalled the equal, or even greater, importance of the "Dumbarton 
Oaks" days of 1944-45, and the Crusade for a New World Order projected throughout 
The Methodist Church. Methodist women played no small part in this program. 

2. The year 1956 marks the tenth anniversary of the birth of the Commission 
of the Churches on International Affairs. This commission is now an agency of the 
World Council of Churches and of the International Missionary Council. It came 
into being soon after the United Nations was formed because Christians in many 
nations felt the need of a world channel through which the Christian voice for world 
peace might be heard in the places where world policies were in the making. Mr. 
John Foster Dulles presided at the organizational meeting, and one of the leading 
spirits in this great movement was the late Dr. Walter W. Van Kirk, who, for thirty 
years, gave unparalleled leadership to the churches in the realm of the Christian's 
responsibility for national affairs. No greater tribute could be paid to Dr. Van Kirk 
than in the following words of Mr. Dulles: 

He was a Christian statesman of outstanding brilliance, insight, and dedi- 
cation, and all people who seek a just and durable peace are poorer because he 
died, but everlastingly the richer because he lived. 

Another world Christian of great stature, who was in attendance at that organi- 
zational meeting, is Dr. 0. Frederick Nolde. He has served these ten years as the 
director of the commission. 

3. The year 1956— like 1940, 1944, 1948, and 1952— is a year when the nation 
takes stock of its resources, looks at the national and world issues — and elects a 
President. 

153 



154 

In 1940, war was raging in Europe and the United States was lending its mora) 
and material aid. In 1944, the United States was in the fray as one of the allies. In 
1948, the material, moral, and spiritual debris — the aftermath of war — was still piled 
high. The United States found that working for peace in the world was more 
difficult as a rallying point than uniting in efforts for war. An iron curtain had 
descended to divide the world. In 1952, the United Nations' conflict of "contain- 
ment" in Korea was an issue of grave proportions as a new President was elected, 
and the nation's leaders again took stock of domestic and foreign affairs. 

The year 1956 may well call for a new kind of appraisal that takes into account 
such matters as the following: 

(a) Western Europe has steadily lost its world influence and power, while 
Russia has emerged as the world's second industrial power and the oft-avowed 
adversary of the United States in competition for the friendship of the under- 
developed areas of the world. 

(b) China, with its population of more than a half billion, has emerged under 
a Communist government to become a primary political and military force in Asia. 

(c) In the past decade, sixteen new nations have emerged in Asia and Africa 
with a population totaling one third of mankind or seven hundred million people. 

(d) Colonial areas have fast dwindled to very small proportions. The last will 
disappear speedily. 

(e) Russia has seized the "propaganda" initiative in the world and is fast 
gaining momentum and loyalty in Asia and Africa. 

(f) The emphasis on military power by the United States has almost lost for 
our nation its place of leadership in the world. Can we redirect our material efforts 
and recapture the moral and spiritual resources needed to bring hope and security 
to the world's people as they grope for freedom? 

4. In 1955, the Woman's Society of Christian Service had its fifteenth birthday 
party. In many places groups took stock of progress and looked again at red-letter 
events. In this fifteenth birthday year, which is also a part of the last year of the 
quadrennium, it is important for the Department of Christian Social Relations to 
review some emphases that have been, and continue to be, great issues and concerns 
in the program of Christian Social Relations. 

(a) During the years of World War II, the major focus was on family life, 
combating the growing alcohol-culture pattern, and "plans for demobilization." The 
demobilization program was concerned in part with a transition from war to peace 
that would conserve and strengthen the new "rights" achieved in a war economy by 
minorities, and unite the good forces at work toward a peace that would make a 
third world war impossible. 

(b) The department's program in the second quadrennium was related to 
"The Crusade for Christ" and was focused primarily on human rights and the 
United Nations. It was in 1945 that the United Nations was organized. It was 
in 1947 that the President's Committee on Civil Rights made its report. This report 
gave new momentum and direction to the nation's concern for civil rights in all their 
aspects. 

(c) In 1948, the department outlined a quadrennial program based on "Human 
Rights — Our World Mission" and adopted as its slogan the words that have become 
the basic goal of all planning since that time — "All Action Is Local." This program 
was focused on seven interrelated goals: influencing church and community prac- 
tices; building safe foundations for family life; arousing the voice and vote of the 



Christian Social Relations 155 

Christian; strengthening the moral forces at work today; safeguarding human 
freedoms around the world; applying Christianity to economic life; and under- 
girding the United Nations. 

On December 10, 1948, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was 
adopted by the United Nations and recommended to its member nations as a 
standard toward which they should work. 

(d) In 1952, the Woman's Division chose as its quadrennial theme, "That the 
Kingdom of God May Be Realized," and the department emphasis on "The Things 
That Belong Unto Peace" became one of the six goals. 

The focus of this goal was on the following emphases: acceptance and sharing 
of those spiritual resources that motivate men to work for the good life for all the 
peoples of the world; new insights into moral responsibility and righteous living; 
the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as the "worksheet" on human relations 
everywhere; recognition of the child as the world's best hope for peace; basic 
economic security for all peoples everywhere ; full access by the peoples of the world 
to good resources for building a world culture. 

(e) The 1956 General Conference of The Methodist Church adopted some 
history-making legislation related to the structure and purpose of the department. 
The action authorized the transfer of Local Church Activities from the Department 
of Christian Social Relations and provided for a Chairman of Local Church Activities 
in the local Society. Guidance and suggestions for this chairman will be sent from 
the office of the executive secretary of the Section of Education and Cultivation of 
the Woman's Division. The chairman will report through the local secretary of 
Promotion. 

//. "To Combine Our Efforts" 

The following high lights of the year only indicate a small part of the significance 
of the task undertaken by Methodist women throughout the nation. 

1. The Study "To Combine Our Efforts — For Lasting Peace" 

The study To Combine Our Efforts for Lasting Peace was intended to help 
create a climate for "modes of thinking" that recognized the changing world where 
people in many lands have numerous questions about us and our leadership in the 
world. They question our foreign policy as well as our racial practices in the United 
States. Many of them are afraid of our motives and military strength. 

Thousands of groups have discussed these issues during the past year as studies 
have been conducted across the church. A total of 36,483 copies of the text had 
been sold by May 31, 1956. This study was planned to guide the women toward 
constructive action for peace. Such action is related to the support of the United 
Nations and the understanding of our foreign policy, as well as to the relation of 
domestic issues and practices to world peace. 

This action may take many forms, one of which is illustrated by the following 
news item. Methodist women shared in initiating this community program: 

Receives Thanks From UNICEF — March 8, 1956 

The Rev. E. Hugh Young, pastor of Oak Park Christian Church, head of 
the Oak Park committee for a project for gifts to UNICEF at Halloween, re- 
cently received the following letter from the United States Committee for 
UNICEF: 

We are most grateful to the churches and the youth in your community who so 



156 

generously shared their Halloween with their counterparts in the more than 90 
countries receiving UNICEF. 

More meaningful than our thanks will be the knowledge that this gift of 
$1,193.15 may mean a glass of milk every day for a week for some 113^35 hungry 
boys and girls, or enough penicillin to cure 9fi44 affected children of yaws. 

We hope you will express our appreciation to all who helped make this past 
Halloween the biggest one yet for "all the world's children." The total to date has 
topped the half million dollar mark. 

2. Special Legislative Issues and Church and Community Action 

A. Legislation 

The following summary from the legislative program recommended by the 
Woman's Division indicates some of the issues on which Methodist women have 
been working during the past year: 

Foreign Policy 

It was recommended: That the United States "vigorously press for the 
acceleration of peaceful processes by which dependent peoples achieve a responsible 
government . . . making clear our respect for the . . . achievements of emerging 
peoples . . . and our desire to see them become full partners in the activities of the 
world community." x 

That the Congress be urged to authorize membership in the Organization for 
Trade Cooperation. 

That emphasis be placed on liberalization of passport and visa regulations and 
the exchange of persons; and on universal enforceable disarmament applicable to all 
weapons of destruction. 

That revision of the McCarran-Walter Immigration Act be sought. 

That the United States government administration be urged "to lead out with 
new determination to make clear to the people of India and the United States . . . 
our appreciation of their (India's) contributions to freedom . . . and mediation 
. . . and peace in the world." x 

Domestic Issues 

It was recommended: That every effort be made to have federal legislation 
enacted that would end the serving of alcoholic beverages on planes. 

That Methodist women be urged to study the issue and make their voices heard 
on federal aid to education. 

That Methodist women work for the speedy enactment of federal civil rights 
legislation. 

B. Church and Community Action 
Segregation in the Schools 

Possibly one of the issues that has been of greatest concern to Christian women 
in some sections of the nation has been the progress toward the implementation of 
the Supreme Court decisions of May 17, 1954, and May 31, 1955. Creating a 
climate for this goal is a major task of the church. The Woman's Division has 
spoken consistently on this issue since long before May, 1954. The General Con- 
ference of 1956 also urged Methodists to work toward the implementation of this 
decision. Possibly the Workshops on World Understanding, reported elsewhere in 
these pages, have contributed more practical guidance at this point than any other 
plan yet used. 



1 Woman's Division Annual Meeting Minutes, January, 1956. 



Christian Social Relations 157 

The Charter of Racial Policies 

The growing interest in the study and implementation of the Charter of Racial 
Policies not only by conferences and jurisdictions, but also by districts and local 
Societies, indicates the great concern of Christian women for "making the teachings 
of Jesus real and effective." As of June 1, 1956, eighty-two conferences and all 
jurisdictions have ratified the Charter. A final count of districts and local Societies 
is not yet available. 

General Conference Action on Race 

As a result of memorials from many sources, including the Woman's Division, 
the General Conference of 1956 adopted three types of resolutions: 

(1) A pronouncement which in substance called upon the church to work with 
reasonable speed to eliminate segregation from its structure and practice and to 
implement the Supreme Court decision. 

(2) A constitutional amendment providing, when ratified by two thirds of the 
annual conferences, a local option plan by which, eventually, the transfer of local 
churches and conferences from the Central Jurisdiction could eliminate that juris- 
diction. No time limit was indicated, and no legislation relating to the basic issue of 
segregation itself on any level was included. 

(3) A commission was created and authorized to study the whole jurisdictional 
structure and bring its recommendations to the 1960 General Conference. 

Citizenship Brunches 

Methodist women during the past year have initiated what will now become 
an ongoing program of citizenship training through the plan for Citizenship 
Brunches, where election issues and methods of working on legislation are studied. 

3. The National Seminar of 1955 

The ninth National Seminar was held August 2-11, 1955, in Kansas City, 
Missouri, at the National College for Christian Workers. The program was based 
on the theme, "A Christian Woman Understanding Her World." Approximately 125 
persons were in attendance, including eighty-four selected women from jurisdictions 
and conferences, twelve youth members, Woman's Division members and staff, plus 
other resource leaders. 

The program theme was directed toward three interrelated channels for build- 
ing world understanding: (1) Through Local Church, Community, and Govern- 
ment Channels, (2) The United Nations, (3) The Christian World Church and the 
Missionary Enterprise. The following excerpts from the preambles to the three 
sections of the Findings indicate something of the focus of the Seminar: 2 

". . . We have come face to face with the implications of our Christian faith 
for our own actions. We have been made more sensitive to the fact that 'Christian 
social responsibility is grounded in the mighty acts of God, who is revealed in Jesus 
Christ, our Lord. He has created the world; all time is embraced within His eternal 
purpose. He moves and acts within history as the ever-living God. . . . From Christ, 
men receive the direction for their service, the obligation to share heartily in the 
world's work and daily tasks, and the responsibility to seek a better social and 
political life.' 

"We have been reminded over and over again by the speakers of the Seminar, 
not only of the need for understanding our world today and the nature of the 

8 Report of World Council of Churches, Section III, Introduction, and 11. 



158 

division among us, but also the urgency which must characterize our work to 'tear 
down the dividing walls of hostility' not only between nations but between peoples 
in our own local communities and within the national community. 

"In the worksheet prepared for this Seminar, we were asked to look at 'walls 
of hostility' in our local church, and to suggest ways in which the local church can 
lead out in creating understanding, and ways in which we can begin to work to 
remove the barriers between us as Christians. We are convinced that 'the Christian 
congregation itself should be a visible center of community and a base for local 
social responsibility.' 3 In honesty, we must admit here the discrepancy between 
our creed and our practice. But we, as Christians, must declare the creed, because 
it is by reference to the creed as a standard that we can judge our failures. 

"Across the face of the world the force of the United Nations is being felt 
today. . . . Believing that the United Nations is one of our most valuable channels for 
building world understanding, a burden and responsibility falls upon Christians. We 
have never before had a political channel which involved so many nations and 
territories in its activities. Never before has an organization in the peace field defined 
its objectives in as broad and far-reaching terms. . . . When once Christians under- 
stand the similarity between its aims and those of our Christian world mission, they 
will be glad to accept that responsibility. . . . 

"In 1952, the International Missionary Council, meeting in Willingen, Germany, 
spoke to a world distraught and fearful: 'We live in a world of radical change. We 
hear the cry of the masses of mankind for a better life expressed in demands for 
land reform, higher standards of living, national independence, and racial equality. 
We see the achievement of political independence and the end of colonialism over 
wide areas. There is a stirring of national and cultural loyalties, reacting against 
further encroachments upon them. Totalitarian states rule a large section of the 
world's peoples and seek to shape popular beliefs. Secularism continues to spread. 
In some areas there is a sharpening of racial issues. Growth in world population 
outstrips Christian expansion. . . . 

" 'Faced with the task of Christian witness in such a world, we are called to hear 
anew and accept once more our Lord's commission, "Go ye therefore"; to realize the 
Church as the instrument in God's hand; to face the problems of communism and 
secularism; to raise a prophetic voice against social, economic, and racial injustice.' " 

Doubtless this Seminar will be remembered primarily because it gave the first 
impetus to the new nationwide experiment with Workshops on World Under- 
standing. The international team made its initial appearance at the National 
Seminar. 

4. Workshops on World Understanding 

Those who have kept abreast of the world situation have been increasingly 
aware of the realities of the shrinking world and of the fact that our local com- 
munity problems are now important in the world context, just as those things which 
happen across the world are important to every community in the United States. 
The challenge has been to find ways of making these facts real to people in every 
part of the country. In an experimental effort to meet this need, the Woman's 
Division authorized in January, 1955, a new program. In cooperation with the 
Department of Work in Foreign Fields, the Department of Christian Social Rela- 
tions brought a team of three women from different parts of the world to live and 



8 World Council of Churches, Section III, 10. 



Christian Social Relations 



159 



work with women in the United States for one year. This was an effort to explore 
together the problems that face the world and our relation as Christian women of 
different countries to those problems. This team included Miss Violeta Cavallero 
from Uruguay, Miss Eva Shipstone from India, and Mrs. Kiyo Tanaka from Japan. 
The experiment began with an initial training workshop held in New York 
October 10-18, 1955, and was attended by forty women, four from each of ten 




regions into which the United States had been divided on the basis of similar 
problems and geographical accessibility. These women had been nominated by 
jurisdiction committees composed of jurisdiction officers. 

During the New York workshop, plans were made by these representatives for 
regional workshops, one in each of the ten regions as follows: Fresno, California; 
Missoula, Montana; McCook, Nebraska; Dallas, Texas; Atlanta, Georgia; Washing- 
ton, D. C; Williamsport, Pennsylvania; Springfield, Massachusetts; Indianapolis, 
Indiana; and Minneapolis, Minnesota. At the regional workshops plans were made 
for approximately ten subregional workshops in each region. 

The international team with the coordinator, Miss Louise Robinson, attended 
all of the regional workshops and as many of the subregional ones as it was possible 
to fit into their schedule. They participated in a total of forty-six workshops. In 
addition, two "saturation" workshops were held as special experiments — one in 
Menomonie, Wisconsin, and one in Roseburg, Oregon. The purpose was to deter- 
mine whether it would be possible, in a period of four or five days, to make sufficient 
impact upon the whole community to result in a significant change of opinion or 
broadening of horizons. The conclusion was that this method was a rich and fertile 
field for further exploration. 

As this report is being written, evaluation questionnaires from members of 
planning committees for ten regional and eighty subregional workshops are on hand. 



160 

These meetings, as reported, were attended by 8,942 women. Incomplete reports 
have been received from eleven additional subregional workshops. 

Statements of important things achieved by the workshops fall into five cate- 
gories. They are in the order of frequency of mention : 

1. Improving race relations. 

2. Seeing the work of the Woman's Society as a whole. 

3. Increasing appreciation of the challenge of missions. 

4. Seeing local problems and needs. 

5. Combating isolationism. 

Of the 80 subregional workshops, 10 were held in areas of great racial tension, 
17 were held in areas where racial tension is moderate, and 53 in areas where race 
prejudice is "a cold war." In the areas of great racial tension, 7 out of the 10 work- 
shops were interracial. In areas where tension is moderate, 10 were interracial and 
in the cold-war area 22 were interracial. As far as could be ascertained, in the latter 
classification all but three of the 31 workshops which were not interracial covered 
areas where there were no Central Jurisdiction churches. In a few more cases, 
there were overlapping provisional conferences involving minority groups that 
apparently were not included in the workshops. 

In reports from the tension area are such statements as: "This was the first 
Methodist interracial meeting in our state, and as far as we know the first of any 
single denomination." And "It was important that Christian white women eat with 
Christian Negro women at a time when the South faced a crisis in race relations." 
Without exception, these reports indicated that the experiment had been successful 
and rewarding. This quotation expresses the general feeling: "Next time it will be 
easier and more profitable." In this group all said that they believed the workshop 
had made it possible to "break patterns" that could not have been broken in any 
other way. 

In the second group, all who had attempted an interracial meeting reported 
satisfaction and the intention to enlarge and improve the area of cooperation next 
time. Participants believed this workshop had made it possible to break barriers 
that had never been broken before. Perhaps the most significant feeling, almost 
universally expressed, was one of increased trust and appreciation between the 
groups, and that those of the minority group had begun to feel really welcome and 
a part of the group for the first time. In places where there is little, if any, legal 
impediment against doing things together, all the workshops which were inter- 
racial seemed pleased with the results. 

The most outstanding characteristic of all group reactions is a discovery of 
what is most necessary in order to bring the two groups together. These words 
sum it up: "Now that they had a part in the planning they came and felt a part of 
the workshop." Only three out of this group reported that they believed this 
workshop made possible pattern-breaking that would not have been possible other- 
wise. The others said that this provided machinery for doing something that could 
have been done all along! 

All of the regional workshops which were located in areas where the Central 
Jurisdiction overlaps other jurisdictions were interracial and planned so that 
housing and meals were on an interracial basis. 

The expressions of belief that these workshops helped us to see our work as a 
whole occurred in forty-eight of the replies. Forty-one reports made some reference 
to the increased vision of the importance of missions that came out of the workshop, 
and thirty-nine made specific reference to the fact that local problems and their 



FINANCIAL CONFERENCE REPORT FOR YEAR— June 1, 1955— May 31, 1956 
WOMAN'S DIVISION OF CHRISTIAN SERVICE— BOARD OF MISSIONS— THE METHODIST CHURCH 



MARGUERITE HARRIS, Tr 



(1) 








CONFERENCE INCOME ON APPROPRIATIONS BY DEPARTMENTS 


DIVISION OF TOTAL RECEIPTS 


Jurisdiction 


Adult 


W.S.G. 


Paid on 
Pledge 
1955-56 


Total 
Pledged 
1955-56 


Youth 


Children 


Total on 

Appropriations 

1955-56 


Total on 
Appropriations 
1954-55 


Appropriations 


Week of 

Prayer 

(Including 

W.S.G.) 


Cash for 
Supply Work 


Supplemen- 
tary Gifts 


Cultivation 

% of lc 
Per Member 


Bequests 


General 
Transient 




General 


Conference 
Work 


Total 
Receipts 


Central: 


$ 1,202.59 
1,487.20 
10,059.82 
1,000.00 
1,800.00 
1,778.96 
10,110.01 
2,676.69 
2,291.30 
2,151.00 
4 , 905 . 75 
991.78 
2,124.00 
8,842.40 
542.15 
5,647.68 
1,591.00 
67.39 


$ 62.42 
186,80 
867.10 
148 00 
158.00 
178.65 
1.310.08 
330.85 
308.50 
149.00 
94.25 
10.00 
285.00 
350.00 


$ 1,265.01 
1,674.00 

10,926.92 
1,148.00 
1,458.00 
1,957.61 

11,420.09 
3,007.54 
2 , 599 . 80 
2,300.00 
5,000.00 
1,001.73 
2,409.00 
3,692.40 
542.15 
7,866.76 
1,891.00 
67 39 


$ 1,600.00 
1,540.00 
9,900.00 
1,000.00 
1,200.00 
3,000.00 
9,700.00 
3,900.00 
3,400.00 
2,300.00 
4,200.00 
1,135.00 
3,000.00 
3,350.00 
1,618.00 
8,000.00 
1,800.00 


$ 4.60 
63.46 
500.00 


$ 16 . 71 
27.88 
96.25 
22.46 
23.50 
21.20 
74.15 
22.00 
23.00 
81.20 
27.50 
30.75 
50.32 
51.50 
11.50 
189.68 
81.00 


$ 1,286.32 
1,765 34 

11,523.17 
1,170.46 
1,495.50 
1,981.56 

11,494.24 
3 , 062 . 54 
2,622.80 
2,470.68 
5 , 084 . 50 
1,059.98 
2,459.32 
3,984 22 
635 59 
8,526.17 
1,982.00 
67.39 


$ 1,054 31 
1,740.16 
10,782.90 
1,180.56 
1,095.00 
2,336 27 
9,716 95 
2,731.12 
2,371.16 
2,080.00 
4,250.19 
1,088.95 
2,296.00 
3,765.67 
1,040.34 
9,038.23 
2,078.75 


$ 1,286.32 
1,765.34 
8,723.17 
1,170.46 
1,495.50 
1,981.56 
11,494.24 
3 , 062 . 54 
2,622.80 
2,470.68 
5,084.50 
1,059.98 
2,459.32 
3,984.22 
635.59 
8,526.17 
1,982.00 
67.39 




$ 58.15 
205.75 
314 81 
56.85 
83.00 
89.05 
477.81 
161.56 
226.87 
239.10 
431.04 
44.91 
35.00 
111.30 
35.50 
537.10 
203.00 


$ X2 50 
184 25 
947.71 
193 30 

95.00 
277.51 
1,497.03 
296.25 
228.75 
163.00 
138.00 

85.00 
216.00 
176.50 
9.54 
642.28 
241.81 

16.78 




% 5.01 

4 3" 
31. 0C 

2.60 
4.0C 
5 . 75 
14.51 
6.00 

5 0( 
7.00 

11 25 
1 . 6( 
4.00 
10 00 
19.00 
18.00 
5.00 






$ 1.431.97 
2.159 71 
12,816 69 
1.423 21 
1,677 50 
2,353.87 
14,383 58 
3,526.35 
3.083 42 
2.X79 7X 
5,664.79 
1,191 39 
2,714 32 
4,282 02 












$ 2,800.00 


















14.00 

2.75 
























$ 900.00 








33.00 




















89.48 
57.00 
27.50 


















Southwest 




















Texas 


240.32 
81.94 

469 . 73 
10.00 














825.46 
100.00 








2,219.08 
300.00 










West Texas 














































Total 


53,269.67 


6,957.73 


60,227.40 


60,643.00 


1,593.78 


850.60 


62,671.78 


58,646.56 


59,871.78 


2,800.00 


3,310.80 


5,491.21 


1,825.46 


153 97 
















North Central: 

Detroit 


150,442.00 
179,091.41 
107,869,28 
133,297 17 
106,561.87 
97,333 97 
27,414 61 
144,020.00 
163,389 67 
228,905.76 
75.116 30 
315,908.58 
204,365.02 
82,140.12 
58,621 10 
37,882.73 
60,317.41 
487.09 


6,975.45 
10,382.42 
10,966.48 
10.185.77 
5,511.45 
6,998.56 
1,518.00 
8,593.04 
6,891.99 
13,254.49 
3,715.35 
16,863 20 
13,084 51 
2,302.30 
8,122.88 
1,587 22 
3,086.96 


157,417.45 

189,473.83 

118,835.76 

143,482.94 

112,073 32 

104,332 53 

28,932.61 

152,613 04 

170,281.66 

242,160 25 

78,831.65 

332,771.78 

217,449 53 

34,442.42 

61,643 98 

39,469.95 

63,404 37 

487.09 


147,700.00 
178,000 00 
123,50(1 00 
123,000 00 
100,000 00 
92 , 500 . 00 
25,000.00 
148,120 00 
158.000.00 
238,000 0(1 
78,000.00 
312,000 00 
209.400.00 
35,000.00 
62,900.00 
39,000 00 
59,800.00 


5,940.28 
9,576.18 
4,635.50 
9,534 39 
8,768 35 
3 , 081 . 00 
995 . 50 
9,353.50 
9,367.20 
8,559.76 
3,575.00 
15,563.40 
5,923.00 
1,335.47 
2,504.26 
1,798.16 
2,526.68 


762.29 
1,267.42 
2,058.99 
1,035.55 
1,106 39 

831.50 

387.29 
2,128.56 
1,326 02 
2,692.33 

668.04 

3,883.42 

1,660.36 

75.52 

702.20 
78.84 

578.96 


164,120 02 
200,317 43 
125,530 25 
154,052 88 
116,948 06 
108,215 03 
30,315 40 
164,095 10 
180,974 88 
253.412 34 
83,074 69 
352,218 60 
225,032 89 
35,853.41 
64,850.44 
41,346.95 
66,510.01 
487.09 


153,575.87 
188,405.68 
124,641.77 
145,285.89 
111,656 81 
105,971.74 
31,044.42 
158,837.44 
172,539.87 
252,617.25 
79,316 25 
338,326 73 
211,904 61 
36,119.23 
64,167.51 
38 , 964 . 02 
62,635.96 


160,070.02 
176,717.43 
122,530.25 
145,632 88 
110,348.06 
106,873 03 
30,315.40 
164,095.10 
175,935.88 
243,012.34 
83,074.69 
352,218 60 
215,682 89 
35,853.41 
61,850.44 
41,346.95 
66,510.01 
487.09 


4,050.00 
23,600.00 
3,000.00 
8,420.00 
6,600 00 
1,372 00 


6,406.67 
7 , 996 . 85 
6,300.96 
7,254.34 
5,127.21 
5,494.22 
1,320.59 
6,536.90 
7,937.81 

10,329.66 
4 , 034 . 85 

16,092.38 
5,828.17 
2,478.44 
4,635.42 
2,258.52 
3,120.21 


15,165 71 
33,731.48 
15,440.84 
11,928.17 
13,831.30 
14,010.26 

3,866.73 
12,445.89 
15,561.85 
19,417.14 

7,583.04 
38,362.44 
12,100 00 

5 , 053 . 75 
10,284 23 

5,135.57 

4,431 10 


4.665.87 
1 , 820 . 75 
1,239.62 
18,774.88 
18,452.96 
1,638.81 


100.00 
104.82 

69.93 

105 73 
74 28 
74.35 
12 45 
71 75 
98.80 

128 62 
51 66 

176.60 
86 58 
25,00 
3X 00 
31 70 
41.62 






190,458.27 






















% 150 01) 


192.266 00 






154,433 81 








129,462 67 








35,515 17 






1,205.74 
2,571 07 
2 , 768 , 59 
356.25 
947.01 
4,742.65 






184,355 88 




5 , 039 . 00 

10,400.00 






207,111 41 








286,066 35 








05.100 l!t 










407,797 08 




9,350.00 






247,799 29 








48,410.60 


Southern Illinois 


3,000.00 


1,480.12 
534 93 
152.40 
694.00 


Ml ,288 21 
49,807 67 






74,265 34 


North Central Jurisdiction 








1,181 09 


Total 


2,118,064.09 


130,040.07 


2,248,104.16 


2,129,920.00 


98,037.63 


21,243.68 


2,367,385.47 


2.276,011.05 


2,292,554.47 


74,831.00 


103,153.20 


238,358.50 


62,045.65 


1,291 39 




150 00 


2,772,384.21 


Northeastern: 

Baltimore 








145,214.41 
54,273.22 
60,341.36 
82 , 948 . 06 
72,671.07 
10,654 48 
37,863 10 
26,657 36 
8,151.49 
61,196.72 
40,985.12 
65,131.28 
74,233 06 
31,609.99 
53 , 273 . 67 
98,329 37 

120,482.85 

55 . 00 

59 , 988 26 

134,125 95 

60,632.85 

654.73 


5,493.61 
1,294.35 
1,265 00 
1,612 74 
2,800 00 
99.00 

907 00 
30.00 

542.00 
1 , 934 64 
4,179.38 
4,054 90 
3,637 19 

994 79 

245 46 
6,287.84 
3,307.57 

100 00 
1.951.67 
12.124.98 
1,788.11 


150,708.02 
55 , 567 . 57 
61,606.36 
84 , 560 . 80 
75,471.07 
10,753.48 
38,770.10 
26,687.36 
8,693 49 
63,131 36 
45,164.50 
69,186.18 
77,870.25 
32 , 504 78 
53,519 13 

104,617.21 

123,790.42 

155.00 

61,939 93 

146,250.93 

62,420 96 

654.73 


127,000 00 
54,000.00 
55,000.00 
84 , 000 . 00 
72,000.00 
10,000 00 
38,500.00 
24,800.00 
8,000.00 
56,000 00 
43,000.00 
58,525.00 
74,300.00 
31,250 00 
46 , 500 00 

100.000.00 

100,000.00 

50.00 

58 , 800 . 00 

126,000.00 
55,000.00 


6,164.54 

2,512.50 

2,432.91 

5,359.61 

1,971.00 

364 71 

2,104.00 

907 94 

206.44 

2,400.61 

1,025.74 

1,293.51 

545.22 

893.70 

1,662.75 

4,613.19 

8,104.05 

'i;36<T42 
6,271 25 
5,677.50 


688.32 
598.43 
545.58 
1,031.80 
160.74 
37.05 
170.90 
60.35 
60.38 
636.85 
110.00 
220.04 
250.99 
154 47 
266 30 
1,296.00 
1,774.04 

150^57 
1,023.31 

475.51 


157,560.88 
58,678.50 
64,584.85 
90,952.21 
77,602.81 
11,155.24 
41,045.00 
27,655.65 
8,960 31 
66,168 82 
46,300 24 
70,699.73 
78,666.46 
33,552.95 
55,448.18 

110,526 40 

133,668.51 

155.00 

63,396.92 

153,545 49 

68,573.97 

654.73 


150,224.66 
60,256.07 
63,533.02 
88,348.23 
79,736.58 
10,646 73 
41,034.52 
26,810.20 
8,330.05 
62,998.36 
45,976.58 
66,343.89 
76,418.24 
33,250.71 
51,818.94 

107, 360 OS 

127,230.91 

208 45 

58,948.57 

147,580 68 
64,342 33 


140,860.88 
58,678.50 
53,744.85 
83,952.21 
74,502.81 
11,155.24 
28,345.00 
24,155.65 
8,960.31 
60,183.82 
46,300 24 
66,149.73 
75,066.46 
33 , 552 . 95 
45,508.18 
91,826 40 

114,768 51 

155.00 

63,396.92 

144,845.49 

61,373.97 

654 . 73 


16,700.00 


8,318.26 
2,900.63 
3,956.67 
5,817.93 
3,123.28 

845.94 
1,692.04 
1,262.79 

530.08 
3,425.28 
1,805.90 
2,780.66 
3 , 347 . 63 
2,181.15 
3,164 91 
5,469.14 
7,286.42 

116.01 
2,864.93 
12,113 18 
2,963 74 


12,846.21 
3,240.65 
4 , 824 . 03 
7,057.64 
7,825.50 
771.74 
6,884.33 
1,034.08 
410.65 
5,261.31 
2,777.07 
4,681.28 
6.671.15 
1,980 44 
3,596.17 
13,185.61 
11,893 16 

3^312 86 

17.7.11 42 
5,408.90 


3,815.10 

436.79 

56.00 

3,147.85 

2,197.75 

" '2^890.72 

1000 

20.00 

2,301.00 

197.97 

2,698.54 

117.70 

1 , 094 . 98 

849.01 

642.05 

02 55 
7,672 50 


85 35 
45 00 
52 00 
46.37 
48 15 
17 10 
38 54 
19.04 
8 21 
44.71 
29 . 59 
42 01 
46.00 
26.86 

' 6o'l7 
65.40 

49^10 
93.00 

132 26 


$ 808 11 




1X2,625.80 
65,801 57 


Central Pennsylvania 

Erie 

Genesee 


10,840.00 
7 , 000 . 00 
3,100.00 


107,022 00 
90,797.49 
12,790 02 
52,550 6:( 
29,971.56 
9,910 15 
74,920.12 
53,213 XII 
78,401 65 
91,429 78 
37.X50 10 
88,804 24 

130,090 88 

168,868 98 

271.01 

69,716 36 

191,155 59 

77,078.87 

836 18 


New England 

New England Southern 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

New York East 

Newark 

Northern New York 

Peninsula 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Puerto Rico Provisional 

Troy 

West Virginia 

Wyoming 

Northeastern Jurisdiction 


12,700.00 
3,500.00 

"5!985!66 

'4!556'00 
3,600.00 

" 9i940'00 

18,700.00 

. 18,900.00 

8^700^00 
7,200.00 


181.45 


Total 


1,299,373 40 


54,650.23 


1,354.023 63 


1,222,725.00 


55,817.59 


9,711.63 


1,419,552.85 


1,371,398.40 


1,288,137.85 


131,415 00 


75,966 57 


121,394.10 


28,421.96 


'l]x 86 


308 11 






South Central: 


153.823 42 
83.984.68 
1,384.45 
90,793 42 
61,628.36 


16,176 58 
17,698 14 


170,000.00 
101,682.82 
1,384.45 
100,421 72 
72,788.21 


170,000.00 

88,000.00 

1 ,091 00 

100,000 00 
75,000.00 


6,922 29 
3,423 11 
175.92 
3,224 00 
2,320 98 


1,154 74 
326 80 
28.54 
690 81 
165.81 


178,077 03 
105,432 73 
1 , 588 91 
104,336 53 
75,275.00 


175,150.63 

98,294 36 

1 , 379 36 

97.262 16 
78,653.03 


177.452.03 
105,432.73 
1,688 91 
101,836 53 
75,275.00 


625 . 00 

2,500 W 


8 . 398 83 
7,129.04 
155.83 
4,485.22 
3,967.23 


18,472 31 

10,000.79 

335 28 

10,768 88 

6,384 79 


1,892 14 

3,501 71 

1 ,785 60 
268 40 


86 68 
36 34 

64 ! 72 

31 57 






206,926 99 


Central Kansas 

Central Texas 

Indian Mission. . . 












126,100 61 

2,079 97 

121.440 95 


Kansas. 

Little Rock. 


9,628.30 

11,159.85 




85,926 99 



FINANCIAL CONFERENCE REPORT FOR YEAR— June 1, 1955— May 31, 1956 
WOMAN'S DIVISION OF CHRISTIAN SERVICE— BOARD OF MISSIONS— THE METHODIST CHURCH 

MARGUERITE HARRIS, Trca 



(2) 



CONFERENCE INCOME ON APPROPRIATIONS BY DEPARTMENTS 



South Central (Continued): 

Louisiana 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

New Mexico 

North Arkansas 

North Texas 

Northwest Texas 

Oklahoma 

Rio Grande 

St. Louis 

Southwest Missouri 

Southwest Texas 

Texas 

South Central Jurisdiction. 



Total 



Southeastern: 

Alabama 

Cuba Mission 

Florida 

Holston 

Kentucky 

Louisville 

Memphis. 

Mississippi 

North Alabama 

North Carolina 

North Georgia 

North Mississippi 

South Carolina 

South Georgia 

Tennessee 

Virginia 

Western North Carolina. . 
Southeastern Jurisdiction . 



Total . 



Western: 

Alaska Mission 

California-Nevada 

Colorado 

Hawaii Mission 

Idaho 

Latin American Provisional. 

Montana 

Oregon 

Pacific Japanese Provisional 

Pacific Northwest 

Southern California-Arizona 

Wyoming State 

Western Jurisdiction 



Total 

Total from Confc-ren 



Other Income for Appropriations 

Deaconess Pension Fund 

Enrolled Home Missionary Pension Fund. 
Interest Income Allocated from Endowments 

and Restricted Funds ... 

Miscellaneous and Gifts for Appropriations 



Grand Total 



$ 95,638 92 
43,915.30 
153.439.95 
21,370 82 
43,017.97 
91,930 01 
72,131 27 
140,748.17 
3,541.02 
73,973.57 
81,670 13 
108.231 28 
151,493 66 
1,088 00 



1,473.804 40 



87.460 48 
280 00 
156,534 19 
112,835 3 
54 , 885 23 
54 , 670 . 75 
76,255.15 
55,891.4 
86 , 569 9' 
124.708 54 
128,443 97 
50,905 64 
148,422.76 
137.539 93 
80,770 
202,034.07 
148,142.59 



1,706.350 16 



1,553.20 

114,347.92 

51,682 18 

2,083.53 

17,416 58 

653 95 

19,368 26 

47,427.22 

474 26 

67,606.37 

241,244 93 

9 , 562 92 



573,421 32 



$7,224,283 04 



14,034 15 
3,512 63 
9,034 94 
5,719.18 
12,617.45 
15,698 56 
12,120 84 
22,678.10 
100 03 
11,260 91 
11,973.47 
17,486.10 
19,902 02 



11,877.54 



18,479 
22,131 12 
11,093.08 

7,329 25 
14,172.23 
15,358.08 
18,215.68 
15,705.47 
33,927.03 

8,181.53 
18,463.47 
16,883 67 
19,229 83 
21,965 68 
23.010.25 



50.00 

8,267 

5,480.70 
100.00 
987.26 

1 ! 656 89 
5.299.80 

117.03 
7,075 71 
19,850.23 

680.54 



$ 728.028.12 



Paid on 
Pledge 
1955-56 



$ 109,673.07 
47,427.93 
162,474 " 
27,090.00 
55,635.42 
107,628.57 
84,252.11 
163,426 27 
3,641 05 
85,234.48 
93,643 60 
125,717.38 
171,395.68 
1,088.00 



1,684,605 65 



99,338.02 

280.00 

175,013.27 

134,966 43 

65,978 31 

62,000 00 

90,427 38 

71,249 49 

104,785 6 

140.414 01 

162,371.00 

59,087.17 

166,886 23 

154,423 60 

100,000 00 

223,999 

171,152.84 



1,982,373.15 



1,603 20 
122,605 61 
57,162 

2,183 53 

18.403.84 

653 95 

21.025.15 

52,727.02 

591.29 

74,682.08 

261,095 16 

10,243.46 



$7,952,311.16 



Total 
Pledged 
1955-56 



$ 94 , 798 00 
40 , 000 . 00 

158,130.00 
27,000 00 
57,200.00 

101,000 00 
76,000 00 

163,397 96 
1,200.00 
78,000 00 
85,800.00 

107,000.00 

151,250 00 



1,574,866 96 



84 , 000 . 00 
95.00 
132,000 00 
120,000.00 
65.000 00 
57,000 00 
78 , 500 . 00 
68 , 500 . 00 
95,000 00 
122,375 00 
145,000.00 
55,000.00 
140,000.00 
120,000.00 
90,000.00 
180,000 00 
140,000.00 



1,692,470.00 



1,550.00 

95,000.00 

49,000 00 

1 , 600 00 

15,000 00 

300 00 

18,000.00 

54 , 000 00 

200 00 

65 , 500 00 

245 , 000 00 

8 , 500 00 



7,234,274 96 



$7,234,274 96 



3.974 47 
1,676.39 
4,307 71 
1,443.25 
1,441.49 
4 , 069 23 
3,710.85 
6,872 32 
183.15 
1,134 67 
2.490 54 
6.301 92 
3,735.27 



1,186.46 
123.50 
9,940 50 
9.068 54 
2,321 14 
3 , 024 05 
3,636 04 
1,765 58 
6,591 56 
5,078 90 
7,159.80 
4,485.02 
7.399.70 
4.507.76 
3,954.24 
10,081 71 
8,912.73 



43.58 
4,029.05 
1,238 34 



59.10 

2,205.58 

8 , 393 89 

366 90 



501 32 
410.36 
671.57 
281.06 
123 09 
330 24 
378.18 
482 . 12 
28.22 
608 38 
678 38 
569 85 
947.67 



461 61 



702 23 
809 98 
584.91 
561 03 
462 71 
161.62 
513.21 
1,724.44 
781.06 
170 50 
859 . 89 
805.7: 
486.55 
1,228.44 
1,081.71 



13.15 
140.51 
482.09 

'26!o8 

2.00 

188.90 

229 49 



145.56 
974.57 
161 00 



Total on 

Appropriations 

1955-56 



$ 114,148 86 
49,514 
167,454 
28,814 31 
57,200 00 
112,028 04 
88,341 14 
170,780.71 
3,852.42 
86,977.53 
96,812.52 
132,589.15 
176.078.62 
1,088.00 



1,750,390 35 



100,986 09 

403 50 

185,656.00 

144,844.95 

68,884 36 

65,585.08 

94,526.13 

73,176 69 

111,890.42 

147,217 

170,311 

63,742 

175,145.82 

159,737.13 

104,440.79 

235,309.90 

181,147.28 



2,083.006.04 



1,659 93 

126,775.17 

58,883 31 

2,183.53 

19.272.76 

662 45 

23,540.15 

56,846.24 

650 39 

77,033.22 

270,463.62 

10.771.36 



$8,434,420.95 



DIVISION OF TOTAL RECEIPTS 



Total on 

Appropriations 

1954-55 



$ 110,997.55 
45,226.54 

161,477.90 
32 , 720 . 5 
57,200.00 

104,805.78 
85,990.82 

165,565 19 

1,691.88 

81,098.85 

93,257.00 

121.716 27 

171.680 80 



1,684,168 69 



92,881.2c 

183 31 

157.424.51 

131,156 18 

67,433 1 

60,015.89 

87,821.82 

73,150 
108 , 734 . 78 
142,751 
167,867.81 

57,013 
164,890 51 
148,029 42 

96,201.80 
243,86; 
170,849.22 



1,970,271 34 



1.673 
111,519.16 
54 , 570 . 54 
2,200.87 
17,839.32 

421.3 
21,427 30 
55.468.57 
417.68 
70.654.09 
261,229 68 
8,784.59 



$8,075,305.01 



Appropriations 



114,148 
49,514 

157,454.17 
28,814.31 
56,800.00 

112,028 04 
88,341.14 

170,780.71 
3,852 42 
86,977.53 
96,812.62 

132,589.15 

176,078.62 
1,088.00 



100,986 09 

403 . 50 

185,656.00 

144,844 95 

68,884.36 

65,585.08 

94,526.13 

73,176 69 

108,890.42 

147,217 3 

170,311.86 

63,742.69 

175,145.8: 

159,737 13 

90,314 79 

232,309 90 

181,147.28 



2,062,880.04 



1,659 93 

124,775.17 

56,683 31 

2 , 183 53 

19,272.76 

662 45 

21,704.15 

54,346.24 

650 39 

76,133 22 

265,063.62 

10,771.36 



8,074,215.62 



10.000 00 
' 400'00 



Week ol 

Prayer 

(Including 

W.S.G.) 



s l'<;l! 52 
3,384 51 
5 . 885 . 09 
3,018 59 
4.835.89 

10,007.20 
8,755.97 

11,011.14 
604 92 
5 , 023 . 79 
5,692 36 
9.661.59 

10,783.34 



Cash for 
Supply Work 



14,126 00 
3,000.00 



2,000.00 
2,200.00 



$ 257,533 00 



12,628 03 
305.88 

13.855.81 

17,051 
6,853 52 
7,104.54 

12,224.72 
8.616.24 
9.356 62 

14.066.47 

11,804.22 
6,808.3 

11,948.06 

11,598.69 
6.594.50 

23,658 35 

14,427.62 



413.78 
6,270.46 
3,880 58 

255.92 

799.99 

26.55 

1.268.59 

2,698.16 

153 60 
5.335.18 
11,572 29 

399.35 



$ 515,470.83 



16,530 21 

6 , 280 64 
15,814 67 

8.251.36 
10,011.22 

8,937 87 
10,785.45 
24,615 62 

1,117.03 
12,967 61 
12,012.23 
21.775.51 
20 . 698 . 95 



Supplemen- 
tary Gifts 



11,131 80 

92 50 

36,162 42 

16,738 24 

6,444 53 

6,370 35 
11,375 18 

3 , 523 . 72 
17,996 55 
16,814 80 
19,077.71 

5,612.21 
16,122 66 
13,621 19 

7,692.05 
32,377 29 
29,255.47 



465 00 

16,853.34 

7,319 62 

371.38 

3,038.35 

2 \ 955! 44 
4,650.98 

65.00 

8,911.57 

36,237 26 

1,627 08 

86.00 



82,581.02 



348 30 

301.00 
28.00 

726.00 
1 , 000 , 00 

334 00 
1,441.76 
4.204.01 



4,117.50 

2,949 "" 

18 00 

10,045 00 

790 76 



33 , 750 . 54 



,264 9 



8,433 2 

17,918.88 

1.447.02 

4,150.00 

1,897 23 

275 00 

5 , 564 . 60 

7,961.53 

4,863 94 

2.717 10 

4,305.00 

1,315.00 

1,500.00 

62,304 61 

14,649 34 

294.11 



140.861.46 



156.22 

2,295 35 

1,344 32 

12 36 

60.00 



1,094 22 
63 . 55 

409 27 
7,646 42 



$ 913,893 87 



$ 280,086.78 



Cultivation 

l A of lc 
Per Member 



38 48 
31.28 

79 07 
18 90 
37 56 
45.09 
33 90 

80 93 
4 91 

35 28 

39 89 
48,21 
64 81 



Total 
Receipts 



139,328 37 
59,512.11 
189,261.00 
40,828.16 
73 . 084 . 67 
131,352 20 
109,358.22 
210,692 41 
5,579.28 
109,121.71 
117,506.36 
164,092.46 
217,670 72 
1,878 76 



45 00 



150 00 
75.00 
31 99 
30 15 
■16 00 
34 76 



70 00 
29.00 
86 92 
55 92 
39.71 
126.00 
112 85 



4,257. 
!i,62H 
1,661 
1,240 
1 , 069 
3,626. 
1 , 808 
1,260 
1,127. 
<,<)09, 
r,608 
.,327 

),167 

1,775. 

1,692 

294. 



1.00 
67.12 
44.45 

1.60 
12 34 

15.82 
31.74 

3 22 
50.29 
110 13 

6.72 



2,664,311 22 



-.(!<>;, 98 

152,261.44 

71,472.28 

2 , 824 . 79 

23,183 44 

689.00 

27.7MII OH 

66,321 34 

935 76 

91,739 53 

329,709 72 

12.804 51 

186 00 



781,603 74 



10,050,087 11 



$ 4,448.57 



I $10,152,759 44 



Christian Social Relations 161 

importance to the achievement of world peace and to the missionary enterprise had 
been made clear by the workshops. Sixteen indicated that they had learned how 
to use the resources available in the community to shed light on local problems. 
Seventeen reports showed good evidence that isolationism had been somewhat 
shaken by the impact of the workshops. Such references as "several have remarked 
that now they read the editorials on foreign policy" were characteristic particularly 
of one region. 

In general the reports indicated good use of resources. Nineteen used foreign 
students or nationals other than the team. Twelve workshops discovered the fine 
resources in human relations and international affairs available from local colleges 
and universities and made use of them. Forty-eight workshops used the filmstrip 
and recording of the team, "One O'er All the Earth." The general feeling of the 
worth-while effect was expressed in such ways as: "I think it high-lighted and pin- 
pointed our blind spots" and "Women thought it very worth while — awe-inspiring 
— and they got a vision and challenge to do more for Christ and his Church." 

III. "Understanding Our World — In the Spirit of Christ" 

This is the great imperative today for Christians who seek a new world of 
peace and justice. 

As steps toward understanding our world the Christian woman must: 

1. Seek to demonstrate the sincerity of her Christian beliefs by 

(a) Building a fellowship without barriers in her local church. 

(b) Securing justice and opportunity for all people in the community and 
nation. 

2. Seek to broaden the horizons of her local church and community through 
new experiences of fellowship with people of other lands and cultures. 

3. Seek to relate her local church and community to available channels for 
building world cooperation and understanding 

(a) Through study of other peoples and cultures. 

(b) Through support and use of the channels of the United Nations. 

(c) Through the use of the resources for world understanding growing out of 
the long history of the missionary enterprise and the ecumenical church. 

4. Seek to create through her local church and community an increased sensi- 
tivity to the needs of the world. 

In the full recognition of the fact that "All Action Is Local" this quadrennial 
program is directed to the local woman in the local church. 

In these words Methodist women are called to action in the new quadrennium! 
As these basic imperatives are translated into action by local women across the 
nation the following specific programs, studies, and activities will be among some 
of the most important things undertaken. 

1. The basic 1956 election issues faced by Christian citizens will be a part of 
their continuing responsibility. Citizenship Brunches are only one device for helping 
groups to understand and act. Whatever happens in the Congress of the United 
States and in government, policy-making agencies that affects understanding in our 
world is the Christian's responsibility. 

This continuing responsibility includes also the need for increasing our knowl- 
edge about alcohol as a world problem. Understanding this will create greater 
sensitivity to our own social and moral responsibility for action on this issue in our 



162 

own homes, communities, and nation. General Conference spoke again in May, 
1956, with unequivocal challenge to Methodists to build an alcohol-free society. 

2. The program of Workshops on World Understanding has been projected 
with some 8,942 women across the nation having shared in the initial regional and 
subregional workshops. Now these leaders and others are responsible for planning 
workshops in districts, subdistricts, and local churches. 

3. One specific way to "seek to demonstrate the sincerity" of our Christian 
beliefs and build a fellowship without barriers in the local church may be found as 
the Charter of Racial Policies becomes the guide for racial policies and practices. 
Every conference, district, and local Society can make this quadrennial emphasis 
meaningful by studying, ratifying, and practicing the principles and recommenda- 
tions of the charter. 

4. Christians are called to build a responsible society where justice, freedom, and 
peace are possible, and where tomorrow's leaders — our children and youth of today 
— can have access to the economic security and the spiritual resources that make 
their world safe. 

5. The quadrennial program calls upon the local woman to "relate her church 
and community to channels for building world cooperation and understanding." 
This means now for us a new kind of program emphasis on the United Nations. 
During the ten years of U.N. history, Methodist women have given valiant leader- 
ship in studies of the structure and achievements of the U.N. The urgent voice in 
today's world calls for a study of new factors in the context of the U.N., such as the 
emergence of new nations, the cry for disarmament, the spirit of anticolonialism, 
the divided world and unaligned nations, and a new look at human rights as a 
crucial world issue. It is also important in the light of these issues that women 
alert their representatives in Washington to the urgency of the need for re- 
appraisal of our policies. 

6. Finally let us find ways to help the local church understand its world as it 
finds its place among its neighbors. For the year 1957-58, a book written by 
Dr. Walter Muelder will relate the local church to the ecumenical movement and 
use, in some measure, the following excerpt from the First Assembly of the World 
Council of Churches as the basic motivation to action: 

Our coming together to form a World Council will be vain unless Christians 
and Christian congregations everywhere commit themselves to the Lord of the 
Church in a new effort to seek together, where they live, to be His witnesses and 
servants among their neighbors. . . . We have to learn afresh together to speak 
boldly in Christ's name both to those in power and to the people, to oppose 
terror, cruelty and race discrimination, to stand by the outcast, the prisoner and 
the refugee. . . . We have to ask God to teach us together to say "No" and to 
say "Yes" in truth. "No," to all that flouts the love of Christ, to every system, 
every programme, and every person that treats any man as though he were an 
irresponsible thing or a means of profit, to the defenders of injustice in the name 
of order, to those who sow the seeds of war or urge war as inevitable; "Yes," to 
all that conforms to the love of Christ, to all who seek for justice, to the peace- 
makers, to all who hope, fight and suffer for the cause of man, to all who — 
even without knowing it — look for new heavens and a new earth wherein 
dwelleth righteousness. . . . x 

1 The First Assembly of the World Council of Churches, edited by W. A. Visser 't Hooft. New York, 1949: 
Harper & Brothers; page 10. Used by permission. 



Report of the Treasurer 



163 



Appropriations for the Year 

June 1, 1956 — May 31, 1957 

Cash Income for Appropriations June 1, 1954-May 31, 1955 $8,075,305 

To the Department of Work in Home Fields $3,205,335 

To the Department of Work in Foreign Fields 3,900,250 

To the Department of Christian Social Relations 46,722 

To Woman's Section, Joint Section of Education and Culti- 
vation 415,823 

To General Appropriations 507,175 

Total Appropriated $8,075,305 

DEPARTMENT OF WORK IN FOREIGN FIELDS 

A. Fields: Missionaries Work Budget Total 

Africa $ 199,403 $ 183,615 $ 383,018 

Europe 4,570 4,570 

East Asia: 

Japan 132,748 134,615 267,363 

Korea 101,350 216,787 318,137 

Southeast Asia and China 177,500 474,207 651,707 

Southern Asia: 

India 198,250 580,958 779,208 

Pakistan 27,600 44,248 71,848 

Latin America 176,098 193,520 369,618 

Total $1,012,949 $1,832,520 $2,845,469 

R. Indirect Support of Missionaries 520,597 

C. Cooperative Rudget: 

National Council of the Churches of Christ in the 

U. S. A $ 101,414 

Interboard Committee for Christian Work in Japan 2,348 

Union Colleges 81,482 

Miscellaneous 9,100 

D. Nonrecurring Items 

E. Department Administration 

F. Contingent (2 per cent of total appropriation) 

Total 

DEPARTMENT OF WORK IN HOME FIELDS 
A. Fields (Summary) : 

Educational Work $ 695,932 

Social Welfare and Medical Work 665,703 

Town and Country Work 337,032 

Urban Work 628,199 

Commission on Deaconess Work 244,025 

$2,570,891 
Buildings and Equipment 250,000 

Total $2,820,891 



194,344 
155,000 

106,835 

78,005 

$3,900,250 



164 



B. Cooperative Work: 

National Council of the Churches of Christ in the 
U. S. A. — Division of Home Missions: 

General Budget 

Indian Work 

Migrant Work 

Missions Public Relations (including Broadcasting 
and Film Commission) 

Spanish-speaking Work, Interdenominational 

Council of 

Town and Country Church, Department of 

Urban Church, Department of 

Division of Foreign Missions: 

Latin America, Committee on Cooperation in 

Division of Christian Life and Work: 

Social Welfare, Department of 

Total 

Other Cooperative Work: 

John Milton Society for the Blind 

Southern Mountain Workers, Council of 

Southern Regional Council 

Total 

Total Cooperative Work 

C. Educational Crants 

D. Ceneral: 

Adjustment Fund 

Advisory Committee Meetings 

Commissioning Service 

Cooperation With Other Agencies 

Group Insurance 

In-Service Training Fund 

Insurance 

Library Service 

Maintenance Fund 

Medical Service 

Missionary and Deaconess Travel 

New Pension Fund 

Norris Scholarship Fund 

Social Security Fund 

Summer Service Training 

Taxes 

Workers in Strategic Areas 

Total 

E. Department Administration: 

Committee Meetings 

Office and Travel 

Salaries — Executive Secretaries and Assistant 

Salaries — Office Secretaries 

Secretarial Assistance 

Total 

F. Contingent Fund (2 per cent of total appropriations) 

Total 



5,780 
3,000 
6,500 

1,275 

160 
800 
600 

50 

300 



$ 18,465 



25 

50 

1,200 



$ 1,275 



7,299 

2,000 

3,000 

3,000 

5,000 

1,000 

105,000 

1,600 

10,000 

2,000 

12,000 

23,375 

2,000 

4,000 

2,000 

4,000 

5,500 



1,500 
19,400 
43,000 
26,936 

5,000 



19,740 
12,000 



192,774 



95,836 
64,094 

$3,205,335 



Report of the Treasurer 165 

DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN SOCIAL RELATIONS 

Administration : 

Salaries $30,657 

Office and Travel 8,000 

$38,657 

Cultivation : 

Jurisdiction School Subsidies $ 1,000 

National Seminar Subsidy 600 

Cooperation With Other Agencies — 
National Council of Churches: 

Department of Racial and Cultural Relations $100 

Department of Social Welfare 100 

Others 300 

500 

Committees 2,000 

Special Promotional Activities 3,030 

7,130 

Contingent (2 per cent of total appropriations) 935 



Total $46,722 



WOMAN'S SECTION 
OF THE JOINT SECTION OF EDUCATION AND CULTIVATION 

Administration : 

Salaries: 

Executives and Other Secretaries $ 57,450 

Assistants, Office Secretaries and Receptionists 40,069 

Office Expense and Travel 26,750 

$124,269 

Education and Cultivation, Woman's Division: 

Education and Cultivation Materials and Sub- 
sidy to Annual Report $75,000 

Quadrennial Program 5,000 

Special Membership Expense 39,500 

Schools of Missions and Summer Conferences. . 9,000 

Cultivation of Theological Schools 1,000 

Assembly 12,000 

Committees and Special Meetings 11,000 

Methodist Youth Fund Promotion 17,785 

Audio-Visual 7,000 

Picture File 500 

$177 785 

Field Work— Salaries and Travel 22^100 

199,885 

Education and Cultivation, with General Section — 
Joint Section of Education and Cultivation : 

Meetings, Conferences, and Committees $ 500 

Joint Literature 10,000 

Mass Communications Fund 15,000 

Interboard Committee on Missionary Education 13,423 

Interboard Age Group Literature 1,400 

National Conference of Methodist Youth 13,856 

Student Conference and Meetings (Regional) 2,500 

Youth Institutes and Assemblies 1,600 

Interboard Committee on Christian Vocations 6,250 

Radio and Film Commission 1,500 

International Youth and Student Conferences 300 

66,329 



166 

Cooperative Budget: 

National Council of Churches of Christ 
in the U. S. A.: 

Joint Commission on Missionary Education $ 6,437 

Washington Office 1,500 

Protestant Film Commission 500 

Committee on Friendly Relations Among 

Foreign Students 1,500 

Student Volunteer Movement 1,000 

United Student Christian Council 250 

Department of United Church Women 5,000 

$ 16,187 

World's Student Christian Federation 1,000 

$ 17,187 

Contingent (2 per cent of total appropriations) .... 8,153 

Total $415,823 

GENERAL APPROPRIATIONS 

Expense of Officers $ 4,500 

Treasurer's Office: 

Salaries $ 87,733 

Office and Travel 7,500 

Audit and Bonding 6,870 

102,103 

Insurance 900 

Social Security 8,000 

Health Insurance 1,900 

Life Insurance 7,700 

Accident Insurance 1,567 

Pensions for Home Office Staff 27,000 

Board and Committees 50.000 

Rent 42,000 

Receptionist — Salary and Expense 3,706 

Literature and Publications: 

Editorial Office: 

Salaries $54,002 

Office and Travel 9,300 

$ 63,302 

Publications, Circulation, Production: 

Salaries $23,124 

Travel 4,250 

27,374 

Literature Headquarters : 

New York $ 3,336 

San Francisco 4,428 

7,764 

98,440 



Joint Services: 

Legal Services $ 9,507 

Library 5,110 

Missionary Personnel 60,911 

Recording Secretary 3,132 

Literature Sales and Display Room 2,500 

Business Department 26,229 

History of Missions 9,625 



117,014 



World Federation of Methodist Women 1,900 

Postage 9,000 

Service 10,000 

Telephone 11,500 

Contingent (2 per cent of total appropriation) 9,945 

Total $507,175 



167 



Report of Treasurer 

Comparisons for the Years Ending May 31, 1956 and 1955 

By Marguerite Harris, Treasurer 

Increase or 
1956 1955 Decrease (*) 

Income on Appropriations $8,434,420.95 $8,075,305.01 $359,115.94 

Expenditures on Appropriations.. 7,178,462.62 6,560,810.18 617,652.44 



Excess Income over Expenditures $1,255,958.33 $1,514,494.83 $258,536.50* 

Increase in income on appropriations for the year ending May 31, 1956, is 
$359,115.94 over income on appropriations for the year ending May 31, 1955, or 
a 4.447 per cent increase. 

Expenditures on appropriations for the year ending May 31, 1956, including 
transfers to reserves for unexpended appropriations of amounts which cannot be 
disbursed currently because of prevailing conditions amounted to $7,178,462.62. 
Details of these expenditures and transfers are given on pages 172-173 of this 
Annual Report. 

Again the excess of income over expenditures for the year ending May 31, 
1956, due to an increase in giving on appropriations for the year just closed and 
for previous years, has made it possible to vote from surplus a distribution of 
$600,000.00 to the three departments of the Woman's Division to be used for 
nonrecurring projects: 

$309,924 for the Department of Work in Foreign Fields 
286,428 for the Department of Work in Home Fields 
3,648 for the Department of Christian Social Relations 

An additional $100,000 was added to the Revolving Fund, making that 
total $700,000. 

In addition to the income on appropriations in the General Fund, the Woman's 
Division received for the year June 1, 1955-May 31, 1956, in its Designated Tem- 
porary Funds $2,126,946.25, which includes the following amounts and which are 
given with the comparative amounts for the preceding year: 

1956 1955 

From Bequests $ 150,064.07 $ 186,477.80 

From Cash for Supply Work 924,287.50 852,452.24 

From Week of Prayer and Self-Denial Gifts 515,582.83 483,023.67 

From Supplementary and Miscellaneous Gifts. . . 537,011.85 364,678.55 



$2,126,946.25 $1,886,632.26 

Total income for the year was, therefore, $10,561,367.20. Last year the total 
income was $9,961,937.27. Endowment Fund principal increased $32,219.13 during 
the year. Annuity agreements issued during the year amounted to $S9,002.83. 
Pension Funds increased $646,227.73, which included transfers from other Woman's 
Division funds, $3,S95.9S from the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and 
$75,000 from the Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



168 

COMPARATIVE BALANCE SHEET, 

ASSETS May 31, 1956 May 31, 1955 

Permanent and Restricted Funds Assets: 

Annuity Fund Assets (Note 3): 

Bonds and stocks (Note 2) (at market 

quotations, 1956, $1,482,192; 1955, 

$1,481,290) $ 1,496,108.11 $ 1,460,714.92 

Life annuity insurance policies, at cost . . 250,109.31 269,140.75 

Cash in banks 32,349.17 32,521.90 

$ 1,778,566.59 $ 1,762.377.57 

Permanent Funds Assets: 

Bonds and stocks (Note 2) (at market 
quotations, 1956, $3,372,735; 1955, 
$3,424,890) $2,013,482.96 $2,265,475.81 

Real estate mortgages, at cost less amor- 
tization 995,666.25 490,193.75 

Cash in banks 83,765.68 36,532.73 

3,092,914.89 2,792,202.29 

Pension Funds Assets: 

Bonds and stocks (Note 2) (at market 
quotations, 1956, $4,913,346; 1955, 
$4,726,766) $ 3,953,378.49 $ 3,810,410.49 

Life annuity insurance policies, at cost. . 1 ,549,250.35 1 ,623 ,619.26 

Real estate mortgages, at cost less amor- 
tization 340,740.00 

Cash held by agent for mortgage acqui- 
sitions 95,000.00 

Cash in banks 226,958.94 85,070.30 

6,165,327.78 ■ ■ 5,519,100.05 

Safekeeping and Restricted Funds Assets: 

Bonds and stocks (Note 2) (at market 

quotations, 1956, $106,335; 1955, $58- 

144) $ 109,156.81 $ 59,150.75 

Cash in banks 9,034.54 4,577.07 

118,191.35 — 63,727.82 

$11,155,000.61 $10,137,407.73 

Designated Temporary Funds Assets: 

Bonds and stocks (Note 2) (at market quo- 
tations, 1956, $16,332,670; 1955, $15- 
691,630) $13,038,684.15 $12,935,610.77 

Note receivable 45 ,000. 00 

Real estate mortgages at principal amount 

less amortization 2,121.80 2,459.45 

Balance of advances for construction of 

hospital (Note 4) 40,000.00 120,000.00 

Cash in banks 2,414,678.05 1,713,457.72 

— ■ 15,495,484.00 14,816,527.94 

General Fund Assets: 

Cash in banks and on hand $1,780,516.85 $2,087,516.29 

Advances: 

Board of Missions for interdivision serv- 
ices and to others 50,649.55 47,846.51 

Ensuing year appropriations 469,914.48 283,188.97 

Land, buildings and equipment at nominal 

amount 1 . 00 1 . 00 

2,301,081.88 2,418,552.77 

$28,951,566.49 $27,372,488.44 



The accompanying notes are an integral part of this balance sheet. 



Report of the Treasurer 

May 31, 1956, and May 31, 1955 

FUNDS, LIABILITIES AND RESERVES May 31, 1956 
Permanent and Restricted Funds: 

Annuity Fund (Note 3) 

Annuity agreements outstanding, at face 

amounts $ 1,790,576.88 

Matured annuties, undesignated 43, 342. 68 

Overexpended income 98,497.24* 

Unexpended net profit on sale of securi- 
ties 43,144.27 

$ 1,778,566.59 

Permanent Funds 

Permanent Fund principal $ 1 , 980 , 800 . 08 

Unexpended income: 

For specific purposes 124, 175. 90 

Unallocated income from investments 352 ,081 .55 

Unexpended net profit on sale of securi- 
ties 635,857.36 

3,092,914.89 



169 



May 31, 1955 



$ 1,783,912.03 
41,380.70 
79,102.40* 



$ 1,948,580.95 



145,993.96 
275,860.22 



421,767.16 



$ 1,762,377.57 



2,792,202.29 



Pension Funds (Note 5) 

Safekeeping and Restricted Funds 

Designated Temporary Funds: 

Fund balances 

Crusade for Christ funds $ 947,419.15 

Week of Prayer funds 1,808,499.87 

Other designated funds 7,371,720.33 

Reserve for unexpended appropriations. 2 ,873 ,605.67 
Allocations of Opportunity fund to be 

designated by departments 1,251, 563 . 55 

Unexpended investment income 472 , 743 .61 

Unexpended net profit on sale of securi- 
ties 729 ,93 1 . 82 

$15,455,484.00 

Mortgage note payable (Note 4) 40,000.00 

General Fund: 

Accounts payable $ 15,561.99 

Missionary salaries payable 5,485.91 

Revolving fund 700,000.00 

Opportunity fund (Note 6), per statement 

annexed 1,580,033.98 



6,165,327.78 



118,191.35 
$11,155,000.61 



15,495,484.00 



2,301,081.88 
$28,951,566.49 



$ 1,138,025.42 
1,740,718.65 
6,695,142.27 
2,883,415.97 

1,456,857.12 
347,007.15 

435,361.36 

$14,696,527.94 
120,000.00 



14,515.39 

9,181.97 

600,000.00 

1,794,855.41 



5,519,100.05 



63,727.82 
$10,137,407.73 



14,816,527.94 



2,418,552.77 
$27,372,488.44 



•Indicates red figure. 



170 



NOTES TO THE COMPARATIVE BALANCE SHEET 



1. The Division has followed the practice of accounting for funds, assets, and 
liabilities transferred by various uniting organizations, in accordance with the plan 
of unification of The Methodist Church, only when such funds and assets have been 
received by the Division. The permanent, restricted, and other funds and assets 
transferred by various uniting organizations to the Woman's Division on or before 
May 31, 1956 and 1955, respectively, have been included in the accompanying 
balance sheet on the basis of amounts and provisions approved by the Executive 
Committee of the Division. The date or time of the transfer of the remaining 
assets and liabilities has not been definitely determined. 

Assets, liabilities, and income and expenses of certain operating units of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service such as the Literature Headquarters and 
The Methodist Woman are not included in the accompanying financial statements. 
Such units operate independently and maintain separate records. 

Furniture and fixtures at headquarters and the Division's substantial interests 
in certain Christian centers, missions, hospitals, and schools in the United States 
and foreign countries are included in the accompanying balance sheet at a nominal 
amount. 

2. Investments in bonds, stocks, and mortgages are included in the accompanying 
balance sheet at amounts which represent cost or amounts assigned thereto by the 
Division at the time of acquisition. The Division, in accordance with its regular 
practice, does not accrue interest on its investments nor amortize premiums on bonds 
purchased. The market value of mortgages is not readily determinable. 

3. Article IV, Section 45, of the Insurance Law of the State of New York requires 
the segregation of Annuity Fund assets as separate and distinct from all other funds, 
which assets are not applicable to the payment of debts other than annuity benefits, 
together with the maintenance of prescribed minimum reserves for annuity 
contracts. On the basis of a calculation of the reserve as of December 31, 1955, 
submitted to the New York State Department of Insurance, the assets of the 
Annuity Fund appear to be adequate to meet the reserve requirement. 

4. The costs of construction of the Bataan Memorial Methodist Hospital in 
Albuquerque, New Mexico, title to which is held by the Division, were financed in 
part by a $400,000 loan from an insurance company, for which loan the property 
was pledged as security. The loan, which is to be amortized at the annual rate of 
$80,000 with interest at 4Vfc per cent on the unpaid balance thereof, had been 
reduced to $40,000 at May 31, 1956. 

5. Based upon actuarial studies made to determine the liability existing at May 
31, 1953, under the various pension funds of the Division, an annual contribution 
of $352,197 is necessary over a period of twenty-five years, together with the 
income from investments, to meet such unfunded liability and current service pen- 
sion requirements. There was an excess of contributions required at May 31, 1956, 
of approximately $173,000 and $160,000 for Home and Foreign pensions, respectively. 

6. During the fiscal year ended May 31, 1956, the Executive Committee ap- 
proved the substitution of the title "Opportunity Fund" for the title "Surplus," 
each of which denotes the unexpended excess of income over expenditures. 

Notes to the Comparative Statement of Income and Expenditures: 

1. In addition to the income shown on next page, designated and undesignated contributions, bequests and other receipts 
aggregating $3,274,310.98 and $2,866,854.65, were received during the fiscal years ended May 31, 1956 and 1955, respectively and 
included in Designated Temporary funds. Unallocated investment income has also been included in Designated Temporary funds. 

2. It is the practice of the Division to allocate from the Opportunity fund to the Foreign, Home and Christian Social 
Relations Departments the unexpended portions of their annual appropriations. Such unexpended balances and other allocations 
for the fiscal year ended May 31, 1956 are as follows: Unexpended Oth 

Totals Appropriations Allocations 

Foreign $ 898,344.26 $588,420.26 $309,924 

Home 316,329.70 29.901.70 286,428 

Christian Social Relations 6.060.95 1,412.95 3,648 

$1,219,734.91 $619,784.91 $600,000 

8. See Note 6 to the comparative balance iheet. 



171 

GENERAL FUND 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 
AND OPPORTUNITY FUND 

For the Fiscal Years Ended May 31, 1956 and 1955 

Income : 
From pledges and other contributions 

for: 1956 1955 

General Appropriations $7,518,131.07 $7,189,730.74 

Conference work 257,533.00 249,563.00 

Memberships 527,219.50 484,476.40 

Memorials 18,625.00 18,561.00 

Specials and miscellaneous gifts 14,309.01 13,080.86 

Enrolled missionary pension fund.... 1,064.76 1,258.70 

Deaconess pension fund 69,603.29 68,488.06 

$8,406,485.63 $8,025,158.76 

Allocation of investment income from 

Permanent and Pension funds 27,935.32 50,146.25 

Total income (Note 1) $8,434,420.95 $8,075,305.01 



Expenditures on appropriations (including 
transfers to reserve for unexpended 
appropriations) : 
Department of Work in Home Fields $3,065,239.30 
Department of Work in Foreign Fields 3,201,635.74 
Department of Christian Social Rela- 
tions and Local Church Activities 42,063.05 
Woman's Section of the Joint Section of 

Education and Cultivation 384,551.74 

General appropriations 484,972.79 

Total expenditures on appropria- 
tions (including amounts unex- 
pended and transferred to re- 
serve for unexpended appro- 
priations, $379,359.34 in 1956; 
$463,879.53 in 1955) 

Excess of income over expendi- 
tures on appropriations 

Opportunity fund (Note 3) : 
Balance at beginning of year 



7,178,462.62 



$1,255,958.33 



1,794,855.41 

$3,050,813.74 
Deduct, as authorized by the Executive 
Committee : 

Expenditures $ 101,044.85 

Transfer to increase Revolving fund. . 100,000.00 
Transfer to Safekeeping and Re- 
stricted funds 50,000.00 

Reimbursement of Designated Tem- 
porary funds for 1954 Assembly ex- 
penses 

Allocations to Designated Temporary 
funds to be expended as designated 

by departments (Note 2) 1,219.734.91 

1,470,779.76 

Balance at end of year $1,580,033.98 



82,826,455.90 
2,941,766.21 

38,068.19 

347,165.45 
407,354.43 



6,560,810.18 



$1,514,494.83 



1,717,689.12 
$3,232,183.95 



97,484.46 
100,000.00 



22,137.38 



1,217,706.70 



1,437,328.54 
$1,794,855.41 



172 



STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES ON APPROPRIATIONS 

For the Fiscal Year Ended May 31, 1956 

Department of Work in Home Fields: 

Home Fields: 

Bureau of Educational Institutions $ 668,034.40 

Bureau of Urban Work 470,634.00 

Bureau of Social Welfare and Medical Work 540,097.00 

Bureau of Town and Country Work 302,616.00 

Commission on Deaconess Work 234,881.75 

$2,216,263.15 

Conference Work 262,033.00 

Buildings and Equipment 250,000.00 

$2,728,296.15 

Cooperative Work 19,690.00 

Miscellaneous: 

Adjustment fund $ 9,105.88 

Advisory committee meetings 3,461.74 

Commissioning service 2,306.45 

Cooperation with other agencies 1,162.95 

Group insurance 4,470.23 

In-service training fund 1,476.99 

Insurance 118,958.86 

Library service 1 ,600.00 

Maintenance fund 10,000.00 

Medical service 2,180.85 

Missionary and deaconess travel 8,194.47 

New pension fund 19,018.75 

Summer service training 2,000.00 

Taxes 3,843.32 

Workers in strategic areas 5,500.04 

193,280.53 

Educational grants 16,854.06 

Administration: 

Salaries, executive secretaries $ 36,653.68 

Salaries, office secretaries 21,850.41 

Secretarial assistance 3,203.87 

Office and travel expenses 16,190.14 

Committees and other travel 2,126.44 

80.024.54 

Contingent 27,094.02 

Total expenditures on appropriations $3,065,239.30 



Department of Work in Foreign Fields : 

Foreign Fields: 
Africa: 

Angola $ 29,776.62 

Central Congo 65,184.05 

Southern Rhodesia 69,918.82 

Liberia 23,649.21 

Southern Congo 22,979.86 

Mozambique 25,443.19 

North Africa 37,762.84 

Africa General 26,567.49 

Asia: 

Borneo $ 18,973.73 

Burma 38,958.12 

China 5,352.68 

Hong Kong and Taiwan 7,349.00 



$ 301,282.08 



173 



India $714,828.82 

Japan, including Interboard Com- 
mittee for Christian Work in 

Japan 248,893.36 

Korea 269,038.33 

Malaya 74,305.22 

Pakistan 57,603.91 

Philippine Islands 131,000.78 

Sumatra 8,950.00 

Asia General 7,000.00 

Latin America: 

Argentina 27,354.95 

Brazil 79,956.51 

Chile 4,718.96 

Cuba 67,028.94 

Mexico 79,659.18 

Peru 19,067.97 

Uruguay 14,885.75 

Latin American General 14,314.05 



$1,582,253.95 



306,986.31 



Add, gains on foreign exchange trans- 
ferred to Designated Temporary 
funds 41,946.71 



$2,232,469.05 

Salary Adjustment 155,292.10 

Indirect Support of Missionaries 301,150.44 

Cooperative Budget 173,530.00 

Nonrecurring 170,000.00 

Administration 108,136.07 

Contingent 61,058.08 

Total $3,201,635.74 



Department of Christian Social Relations 
and Local Church Activities: 

Administration $ 38,024.78 

Cultivation 4,038.27 



Total $ 42,063.05 



Woman's Section, Joint Section of 
Education and Cultivation: 

Administration $ 114,745.74 

Education and Cultivation 256,113.23 

Cooperative Work 11,937.00 

Contingent 1,755.77 



Total $ 384,551.74 



General Appropriations: 

Officers' Travel $ 4.500.00 

Treasurer's Office 98.292.09 

Committees, Meetings 41,539.00 

Pensions, Rent, Social Security 94,348.96 

Editors' Offices 61,057.44 

Publication, Production, and Circulation 36,486.69 

Joint Services of the Board of Missions 134.830.38 

World Federation of Methodist Women 1,800.00 

Postage 9,672.70 

Contingent 2,445.53 



Total $ 484,972.79 



Total Expenditures on Appropriations $7,178,462.62 



Section of Education and Cultivation 

You are but one woman as you read this word, but as you work in 
your local Woman's Society of Christian Service, through the depart- 
ments and section of the Woman's Division, through the missionaries 
and workers throughout the world, your strength is increased a 
thousandfold. Working together in the spirit of Christ we shall make 
this a better world. 

Mrs. John M. Pearson, Chairman 

Organization and Promotion 

By Dorcas Hall, Executive Secretary 
Maude White Hardie, Assistant to the Executive Secretary 

WITH this year, June 1, 1955 — May 31, 1956, the quadrennium comes to a 
close. Conference, district, and local Societies were urged to finish the plans 
for the current quadrennium before introducing the new plans. To this end 
the familiar theme and goals were re-emphasized with fresh suggestions for their 
interpretation and presentation. The conferences used original and telling methods. 
The theme — That the Kingdom of God May Be Realized — was stressed as an ideal 
to be kept constantly in mind by groups and individuals. 

The goal of 2,000,000 adult members (Woman's Society plus Guild) by May 
31, 1956 was not met. The total Woman's Society of Christian Service membership 
was reported as 1,709,899; total adult membership, as 1,841,919. The number of 
Woman's Societies is 31,014, an increase this year of 325. New members to the 
number of 118,789 were reported, although the net gain in Woman's Society member- 
ship shows only 28,668. It is hoped that hereafter this seeming discrepancy may be 
accounted for by the new plan of reporting transferred members, in and out, 
separately from women who are actually new members of the Society. The number 
of unorganized churches is 5,906. We have a challenging task before us at this point 
in the new quadrennium. 

The plan has been continued to print names in The Methodist Woman of 
those Societies newly reported where every woman member of the church is enrolled 
as a member of the Woman's Society or Guild, and names of districts where every 
church has a Woman's Society or Guild, or district member or members. Three 
hundred fifty-two such Societies and twenty-five such districts have been newly 
reported this year. The printing of these "one hundred percenters" will now be 
discontinued, but it has served a useful purpose. 

Per capita giving this year is $5.25. Last year it was $5.06. 
Leadership training has been a major emphasis this past year. It has been 
presented in The Methodist Woman from various angles. The importance of 
volunteer service in the ranks of the Society and Guild has been pointed up. 
Repeated attempts have been made to differentiate between officers' training, a 
specific, and leadership training, a more general, area of service. There is need for 
continuous preparation of new women for leadership and for more effective service. 
To this end, the rotating of women in offices and the holding of office on more than 
one level (except local) at the same time have been discouraged. Attempts have 
been made to show the value of having a larger number of women becoming better 
acquainted with the work, rather than concentrating leadership in the hands of 
a few. 

174 



Section of Education and Cultivation 175 

The course on "The Work of the Woman's Society of Christian Service and the 
Wesleyan Service Guild in the Local Church" is designed to further this policy of 
leadership education. In promoting this course the secretary of Promotion co- 
operates with the secretary of Missionary Education. 

The coming year will see plans under way for a series of regional workshops, 
to train women for presenting and implementing this course effectively across the 
country. 

The new pattern of attendance at Summer Schools of Missions and Christian 
Service now provides for the secretary of Promotion to go each year. 

At midyear, a check-sheet was printed in The Methodist Woman for adapta- 
tion by local groups, to check their progress and note spots needing attention. 

In one sense, changes of procedure for the new quadrennium do not belong in a 
report of the former year's activities. Yet this report would be incomplete without 
reference to them, as planning for these changes has consumed a large amount of 
time and taken much thought and study. The matter of the small Society was one 
such topic. The so-called Modified Plan has failed to meet the need satisfactorily 
and another plan for selecting officers and method of reporting had to be provided. 

Another item requiring attention and change was the report blanks, which are 
printed for the entire quadrennium. Decision to have reports made on three dates 
only, instead of four, and to have questions omitted from the Promotion blanks if 
they overlapped and duplicated the reports of other lines of work, met with hearty 
accord. A Record and Report Book was sent free to each local Society, together 
with a poster of the quadrennial symbol, theme, and goals. 

During the year the Woman's Division recommended that Local Church 
Activities be separated from Christian Social Relations, and be made the responsi- 
bility of the Section of Education and Cultivation. This was voted by General 
Conference on recommendation of the Committee on Missions of the General 
Conference. Provision was made for a chairman of Local Church Activities, and a 
Committee on Local Church Activities of which the secretary of Promotion is to 
be a member. These are to be on the local level only. 

General Conference also voted to make the pastor of a church a member 
ex officio of the executive committee of the Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

Emphasis continues to be laid on the aims for which Promotion exists — the 
purpose of the Woman's Society. In keeping with this, publicity was given through 
the Section of Education and Cultivation concerning a missionary trip to visit the 
Methodist work in Puerto Rico. In the travel group were conference secretaries of 
Promotion from various parts of the country, and the executive secretary of the 
Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation. Also in the 
interest of Promotion, Miss Theressa Hoover, field worker, visited the work in 
Alaska. 

The relationship of the Woman's Society of Christian Service to the total 
program of the local church has been repeatedly stressed through articles in The 
Methodist Woman and through speeches and discussions. The emphasis in the 
new quadrennial goals of the Woman's Division, on the local church and on edu- 
cational institutions, parallels the church's quadrennial program so far as is possible 
within the framework of our organization. 

The seven new goals of the Woman's Division challenge us. The new theme 
moves us to personal and group rededication and increased effort. The new symbol 
expresses for us that toward which we shall devote our effort — the spirit of Christ, 
for all of life. 



176 



SUMMARY OF ANNUAL REPORTS— 1955-1956 
From the 102 Conference Woman's Societies of Christian Service 

July, 1956 

Dorcas Hall, Executive Secretary, 
Section of Education and Cultivation 



Conference 



Northeastern Jurisdiction- 
Baltimore 

Central New York. . 

Central Pennsylvania 

Erie 

Genesee 

Maine 

Newark 

New England 

New England Southern . . 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

New York East 

Northern New York 

Peninsula 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Troy....... 

West Virginia 

Wyoming 

Puerto Rico (Prov. Conf.) 

Totals 

Southeastern Jurisdiction- 
Alabama 

Florida 

Holston 

Kentucky 

Louisville 

Memphis. 

Mississippi 

North Alabama 

North Carolina 

North Georgia 

North Mississippi 

South Carolina 

South Georgia 

Tennessee 

Virginia 

Western North Carolina.. 
Cuba (Prov. Conf.) 

Totals 

Central Jurisdiction- 
Central Alabama 

Central West 

Delaware 

East Tennessee 

Florida 

Georgia 

Lexington 

Louisiana 

Mississippi 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Southwest 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Upper Mississippi 

Washington 

West Texas 

Totals 



Number 
Societies 



509 
253 
421 
319 
286 
153 
257 
188 
145 

82 
311 
262 
239 
211 
359 
346 
414 
312 
850 
313 

38 

6,268 



429 
428 
693 
325 
329 
388 
331 
499 
722 
686 
318 
714 
481 
380 
1,013 
892 
43 



,002 



125 

60 

205 

58 

65 

150 

128 

90 

147 

109 

237 

91 

05 

128 

271 

206 

135 



2,273 



Member- 
ship 
Woman's 
Society 



34,224 
17,567 
20,411 
18,602 
18,705 

6,651 
17,639 
15,040 

7,277 

3, 
17,199 
11,125 
16,263 
10,588 
23,626 
24,576 
26,430 
19,147 
35,970 
17,544 

1,046 

363,444 



14,491 
35,430 
26,417 
12,053 
11,263 
16,609 
11,234 
21,060 
32,346 
27,422 

9,087 
31,300 
20,633 
13,732 
52,086 
40,629 

1,128 



376,920 



1,976 
1,665 
5,947 
1,361 
1,681 
2,262 
6,095 
1,967 
2,159 
1,480 
3,490 
800 
1,982 
2,102 
1,896 
5,980 
2,460 



45,303 



Total Adult 

Membership 

(WSCS- 

WSG) 



35,264 
17,851 
20,633 
18,915 
19,161 

6,651 
18,511 
15,416 

7,865 

4,079 
17,709 
12,075 
17,255 
10,878 
23,756 
25,639 
27,239 
19,613 
38,337 
18,041 

1,106 

375,994 



16,818 
38,565 
30,632 
13,556 
12,307 
19,877 
12,998 
24,674 
34,912 
33,884 
10,891 
35,138 
24,168 
16,234 
55,761 
45,211 
1,140 



426,766 



2,063 
1,665 
6,410 
1,514 
1,901 
2,409 
6,913 
2,178 
2,397 
1,493 
3,570 
840 
2,113 
2,381 
1,925 
6,733 
2,590 



49,095 



New 
Societies 



273 



New 

Members 

'55-' 56 



2,298 
321 
388 

1,018 
747 
273 

1,230 
701 
359 
79 
562 
436 

1,057 
445 
896 

1,008 

2,165 
875 

2,810 

1,274 



18,942 



1,626 
5,134 
2,179 

859 
1,092 
1,966 

796 

888 
2,685 
2,233 

434 
3,259 
2,046 
1,349 
4,009 
3,216 



33,771 



390 
24 

101 
18 

120 
69 

224 
81 
14 



300 
102 
20 



1,602 



Unorgan- 
ized 
Churches 



30 
70 
23 
19 

19 
13 
32 

95 

759 



1,405 



243 
7 
299 
141 
231 
142 
180 
313 

20 

124 

150 

4 

91 
290 
131 
157 



2,529 



144 



Subscribers to 
T.M.W. W.O. 



5,532 
1,218 
1,382 
2,576 
2,017 

483 
1, 
1,601 

616 

329 
1, 
1,327 
2,008 

952 
2,347 
2,100 
3,3. 
1,451 
5,972 
1,930 

23 



40,947 



3,803 

8,899 

5,831 

2, 

2,415 

4,023 

2,397 

4,468 

6,961 

5,056 

1,750 

6,667 

4,873 

2,789 

8,590 

7,523 



78,233 



119 
652 

1,031 
220 
217 
127 

1,427 
175 
349 
320 
120 
100 
163 
412 
60 
564 
374 



6,430 



2,308 
494 
438 

1,209 
966 
210 
956 
695 
257 
141 
830 
682 

',068 
449 
641 

1,083 

1,462 
736 

2,011 

823 

18 



17,477 



1,633 
5,532 
2,597 

785 
1,073 
2,025 

842 
1,424 
2,222 
2,396 

482 
2,311 
1,896 
1,039 
3,914 
2,579 



32,750 



200 

338 
70 
70 
30 

571 
51 
71 

119 
65 
33 
85 

145 
20 

127 

138 



2,201 



Section of Education and Cultivation 



177 



Summary of Annual Reports — Continued 



Conference 



North Central Jurisdiction- 
Detroit 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa-Des Moines 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

North Dakota 

North-East Ohio 

North Indiana 

North Iowa 

Northwest Indiana 

Ohio 

Rock River 

South Dakota 

Southern Illinois 

West Wisconsin 

Wisconsin 

Totals 

South Central Jurisdiction- 
Central Kansas 

Central Texas 

Indian Mission 

Kansas 

Little Rock 

Louisiana 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

New Mexico 

North Arkansas 

North Texas 

Northwest Texas 

Oklahoma 

Rio Grande 

St. Louis 

Southwest Missouri 

Southwest Texas 

Texas 

Totals 

Western Jurisdiction — 

Alaska Mission 

California-Nevada 

Colorado 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Montana 

Oregon 

Pacific Northwest 

Southern California-Arizona . . 

Wyoming State 

Latin American (Prov. Conf.). 
Pacific Japanese (Prov. Conf.) 

Totals 

Grand Totals, 1955-56... 

Grand Totals, 1954-55... 



Number 
Societies 



509 
614 
500 
470 
432 
387 
126 
682 
425 
420 
270 
1,025 
354 
170 
324 
237 
223 



7,168 



397 

257 

63 

345 

217 
337 
284 
422 
113 
297 
24S 
271 
498 
80 
251 
314 
269 
410 



5,073 



12 

323 

192 

19 

57 

111 

15S 

250 

350 

34 

34 

24 



1,570 
31,014 
30,649 



Member- 
ship 
Woman's 
Society 



39,891 
40,666 
27,725 
41,763 
29,616 
28,810 
4,726 
50,894 
26,970 
39,839 
20,719 
69,730 
33,654 
10,500 
13,927 
12,671 
16,303 



508,404 



32,885 
12,627 
970 
24,590 
11,086 
13,736 
12,045 
29,444 

6,943 
12,246 
15,671 
11,585 
28,537 

1,853 
12,706 
15,339 
16,114 
23,598 



281,975 



345 

26,231 

17,298 

634 

4,663 

6,287 

12,125 

19,203 

42,522 

2,515 

709 

1,321 



133,853 
1,709,899 
1,681,231 



Total Adult 

Membership 

(WSCS— 

WSG) 



41,116 
42,402 
29,241 
43,903 
30,887 
29,939 
4,978 
53,261 
28,713 
41,480 
21,709 
72,375 
35,211 
11,033 
15,848 
13,203 
16,879 



532,178 



34,894 
14,911 
973 
26,172 
12,929 
15,688 
12,948 
31,177 

7,905 
14,941 
18,182 
13,740 
31,859 

1,966 
14,426 
17,078 
18,826 
26,715 



315,330 



371 

27,983 

18,345 

657 

4,971 

6,580 

12,960 

20,459 

45,519 

2,661 

709 

1,341 



142,556 
1,841,919 
1,811,870 



New 

Societies 



13S 



36 
713 
B8fi 



New 

Members 

'55-'56 



1,688 
1,501 
1,560 
2,096 
1,999 
1,163 

144 
2,904 
1,346 
2,111 

925 
4,110 
1,785 

590 
1,173 

771 

787 



26,653 



2,040 

1,541 

62 

1,729 

914 
1,684 
1,019 
1,932 

916 

931 

1,594 

1,321 

2,571 

62 

951 
1,075 
1,870 
2,913 



25,125 



73 

1,881 

1,549 

99 

274 

548 

1,100 

1,895 

5,062 

165 

2 



12,696 
118,789 
116,935 



Unorgan- 
ized 
Churches 



529 



15 
104 
24 
24 
79 
54 
100 

11 

3 
222 

7 
33 

77 
1 

123 
93 

14 

200 



1,184 



115 
5,906 
5,966 



Subscribers to 



T.M.W. W.O 



5,876 
6,110 
4,830 
6,817 
3,943 
3,694 

900 
6,016 
4, 
5,993 
2,982 
9,081 
4,215 
1,332 
2,966 

752 
2,413 



72,888 



6,562 
3,558 
119 
3,524 
2,441 
4,492 
2,146 
5,783 
1,840 



2,396 
4,167 
4,294 
6,179 
130 
3,019 
3,248 
6,155 
6,763 



66,816 



97 

4,106 

2,616 

114 

835 

931 

2,174 

3,753 

8,265 

270 

3 

67 



23,231 
288,545 
277,086 



2,973 

2,773 

2,025 

2,247 

2,153 

1,546 

439 

2,407 

2,200 

2,048 

1,362 

3,901 

1,945 

557 

831 

340 

1,054 



30,801 



2,927 

1,646 

96 

1,292 

1,018 

1,827 

705 

1,984 

903 

845 

2,235 

2,387 

2,214 

98 

1,012 

1,243 

2,847 

3,069 



28,348 



68 

2,369 

1,039 

108 

428 

379 

1,217 

1,846 

5,466 

91 

3 

30 



13.044 
124,621 
122,126 



178 



Missionary Education 

By Elizabeth Stinson, Secretary 

SUMMARY OF REPORTS OF MISSIONARY EDUCATION 
June 1, 1955— May 31, 1956 



Jurisdiction 



co 
o 

■° 332 

oo J 

to v w 

B B .c 

sol' 



Number of Study Clares 



J»-S 



<= 5- 



o 



ctqb 



to m eJ 

•a -a 



9°§e 



S p g^sj a, 
5-a-o eg 



Central 

North Central 
Northeastern . 
South Central 
Southeastern.. 
Western 

Totals . . . 



1,385 
4,641 
2,584 
4,090 
6,575 
978 



1,399 
1,556 

685 
1,177 
1,926 

241 



20,253 



6,984 



486 
1,978 

978 
2,082 
3,128 

598 



1,021 
5,227 
4,977 
14,152 
17,165 
1,889 



13,797 
101,669 
115,812 
223,766 
278,545 

45,020 



334 
2,802 
1,566 
5,801 
5,873 

739 



3,111 
10,363 

6,505 
15,558 
21,703 

8,457 



1,703 
11,676 

5,891 

6,188 
10,660 

1,559 



9,250 



44,431 



778,609 



17,115 



65,697 



37,677 



1,223 
6,546 
2,905 
4,602 
4,371 
1,815 



21,462 



REPORT OF SCHOOLS OF MISSIONS AND CHRISTIAN SERVICE— 1955 



JURISDICTION SCHOOLS 

No. in 

Jurisdiction Attendance 

Central 162 

North Central 316 

Northeastern 278 

South Central 407 

Southeastern 237 

Western 96 

Totals 1,496 



No. Enrolled No. Board of 



in Credit 


Education 


Classes 


Credits 


143 


133 


273 


270 


255 


240 


383 


373 


224 


213 


90 


88 



1,368 



1,317 



CONFERENCE SCHOOLS AND INSTITUTES 



Conference 
Central Jurisdiction: 

Central Alabama 

Central West 

Delaware 

East Tennessee 

Florida 

Georgia , 

Lexington 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Southwest 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Upper Mississippi 

Washington 

West Texas 

Total 





No. Enrolled 


No. Board of 


No. in 


in Credit 


Education 


Attendance 


Classes 


Credits 


35 


35 


34 


68 


56 


56 


109 


89 


89 


30 


27 


24 


47 


35 


26 


78 


44 


19 


169 


156 


153 


81 


77 


68 


69 


42 


41 


38 


34 


34 


83 


43 


37 


63 


52 


49 


78 


70 


68 


113 


71 


68 



1,061 



831 



766 



Section of Education and Cultivation 



179 



Conference 

North Central Jurisdiction: 
Detroit: 

Adrian 

Marquette 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa-Des Moines 

Michigan: 

Albion 

Alma 

Minnesota 

North Dakota 

North-East Ohio: 

Bethesda 

Lakeside 

North Indiana 

North Iowa 

Northwest Indiana 

Ohio: 

Delaware 

Lakeside 

Lancaster 

Sabina 

Rock River 

South Dakota 

Southern Illinois 

West Wisconsin: 

Pine Lake 

Whispering Pines. . . . 
Wisconsin 

Total 





No. Enrolled 


No. Board of 


No. in 


in Credit 


Education 


Attendance 


Classes 


Credits 


270 


248 


227 


120 


89 


. . 


288 


266 


261 


169 


155 


146 


289 


245 


237 


365 


365 




217 


188 




248 


215 


159 


118 


100 




117 


84 


76 


718 


580 


449 


218 


200 


166 


263 


246 


219 


216 


190 


169 


202 


183 


168 


346 


324 


187 


167 


143 


108 


170 


156 


134 


299 


267 


263 


124 


120 


89 


117 


103 


89 


149 


109 


83 


78 


69 


63 


196 


171 


159 



6,230 



4,816 



3,452 



Northeastern Jurisdiction: 

Baltimore 

Central New York 

Central Pennsylvania . . 

Erie 

Genesee 

Maine 

Newark 

New England 

New England Southern. 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

New York East 

Northern New York. . . 

Peninsula 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Troy 

West Virginia 

Wyoming 

Total 



244 


238 


197 


210 


189 




114 


268 




96 


75 


68 


165 


140 




36 


61 


37 


154 


89 


68 


99 


91 


85 


34 


29 


27 


29 


46 


41 


98 


82 


77 


130 


123 




139 


127 


117 


95 


84 


75 


107 


99 


91 


126 


116 


116 


343 


325 


37 


274 


256 




226 


178 


i76 


118 


104 


98 



2,627 



2,531 



1,310 



180 



Conference 
South Central Jurisdiction: 

Central Kansas 

Central Texas 

Kansas 

Little Rock 

Louisiana 

Missouri-St. Louis 

Nebraska 

New Mexico 

North Arkansas 

North Texas 

Northwest Texas 

Oklahoma: 

Camp Egan 

Oklahoma City 

Southwest Missouri 

Southwest Texas 

Texas 



Total . 



Southeastern Jurisdiction: 

Alabama 

Florida 

Holston 

Kentucky 

Lincoln Leadership 

Louisville 

Memphis 

Mississippi 

North Alabama 

North Carolina 

North Georgia 

North Mississippi 

South Carolina 

South Georgia 

Tennessee 

Virginia 

Western North Carolina. 
Totals 



Western Jurisdiction: 

Alaska Mission 

California-Nevada 

Colorado: 

Pinecrest 

Western Slope Area 

Hawaii Mission 

Idaho 

Montana 

Oregon : 

Ashland 

Camp Magruder 

Pacific Northwest 

Southern California- Arizona: 

Redlands School 

Redlands Institute 

Wyoming State 

Totals 

Conference Schools: 

Total, 1955 

Total, 1954 



Conference and Jurisdiction Schools: 

Total, 1955 

Total, 1954 





No. Enrolled 


No. Board of 


No. in 


in Credit 


Education 


Attendance 


Classes 


Credits 


178 


155 


137 


211 


193 


169 


161 


129 


123 


113 


111 


98 


250 


236 


212 


208 


200 


200 


389 


348 


312 


109 


108 


85 


130 


117 


113 


252 


242 


214 


440 


426 


374 


194 


143 


139 


470 


448 


352 


225 


184 


139 


481 


403 


361 


384 


306 


271 


4,195 


3,749 


3,299 


110 


105 


98 


417 


395 


378 


257 


241 


210 


115 


110 


106 


113 


102 


99 


134 


100 


96 


207 


198 


189 


177 


168 


149 


591 


282 


248 


299 


289 


234 


286 


230 


214 


100 


84 


74 


275 


255 


241 


243 


231 


201 


149 


137 


128 


465 


446 


431 


196 


179 


165 


4,134 


3,552 


3,261 


36 


35 




289 


258 


235 


146 


140 




44 


39 




39 


38 


36 


64 


110 


49 


47 


47 


37 


57 


52 


46 


114 


108 


95 


205 


199 


193 


129 


118 


109 


501 


495 




48 


43 


27 


1,719 


1,682 


827 


19,966 


17,161 


12,915 


19,007 


16,104 


1 1 , 602 


21,462 


18,529 


14,232 


20,353 


17,335 


12,782 



Number of Schools and Institutes Held in 1955: 

Conference Schools and Institutes 

Jurisdiction Schools 

Total Number of Schools and Institutes. 



104 

6 

110 



Section of Education and Cultivation 



181 




Wesleyan Service Guild 

By Lillian A. Johnson, Secretary 

THE Spirit of Christ— for All of Life is in- 
herent in the purpose of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild. The giving on pledge for 
the year 1955-56 was $728,028.12, an increase 
of $60,474.54 or 8.3 per cent over the previous 
year. This is on pledge alone. Per capita giving 
on pledge was $5.56. On total giving it was 
well over $6.00. 

Effective Program — Increased giving is a direct outgrowth of effective program 
and activity in the Guild. The Guild Weekend is an important part of the program 
which is continually developing both in attendance and content. A Weekend is a 
short time for those who want to learn all about the Guild, as many of the officers 
say when they come, but even so, many questions are answered. Seeds are sown 
which may result in changed attitudes, and the inspiration and fellowship of the 
Guild Weekend establish a climate that is remembered for a long time. 

In local Guilds, work in Spiritual Life and Status of Women seem to have 
increased in emphasis. The Wesleyan Service Guild has taken an active part in 
the regional Workshops on World Understanding which have been held this year. 
Miss Louise Robinson, the coordinator for the international team which traveled 
about the country in connection with the workshops, spoke in glowing terms of the 
contribution of Guild members. Reports from the six Guild members who attended 
the seminar on "The Christian Woman Understands Her World" held in Kansas 
City in August, 1955, show that they have taken leadership in workshops and 
seminars throughout the year. 

Several conferences and two jurisdictions have adopted the Charter of Racial 
Policies of the Woman's Division. Others are studying it preparatory to taking 
action. An increasing number of Guild mission study classes are being conducted 
according to the suggested method for jurisdiction credit classes. 

Special Interests — The "Special Interests" are certain projects chosen from 
the work of the Woman's Division of Christian Service to receive special emphasis 
in the Wesleyan Service Guild for a period of time, usually a quadrennium. The 
projects are featured on the Guild pages of The Methodist Woman, and Guild 
members look for stories and references to them as they read World Outlook, The 
Methodist Woman, and the Annual Report. In the tremendous program of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service, new Guild units and Guild members are 
often at a loss to know where to begin in their study of the work. The Special Interest 
plan helps by allowing them to concentrate on a small portion of the work at a time. 
Guilds are encouraged, however, eventually to broaden their interests to include the 
total program. 

For this quadrennium, the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild, 
in cooperation with the Departments of Work in Home and Foreign Fields of the 
Woman's Division, chose Public Health and Nursing Education and Community 
Centers in foreign fields, and Educational Institutions and Residence Halls in the 
home fields as the areas from which to pick the Special Interests. The standing com- 
mittee is grateful to the departments for steering the Guild toward some of the 



182 

most fascinating pioneer work of the Woman's Division for its special study during 
the coming quadrennium. 

Foreign Fields 

Africa — Public Health and Nursing, Nyadiri, Southern Rhodesia. 

Mexico — Social Center and Medical Clinic, Centro MacDonnell, Durango. 

Cuba — Public Health, Escuela Agricola e Industrial, Preston. 

Korea — Clinic and Public Health in Kangneung District; Tai Wha Community 
Center, Seoul. 

Japan — Social Center, Fukushima Center, Hiroshima. 

Southeast Asia — Public Health Center, Rangoon, Burma; Medical and Social 
Center, Sibu, Sarawak; Dyak Medical Work, Sarawak. 

India — Public Health and Simri Village Center, Buxar; Linn Dispensary and Health 
Center, Yellari; Health Dispensary, Belgaum District; Nursing Education, Methodist 
Hospital, Nadiad; Public Health, Vikarabad; Public Health, Madar Union Sanatorium. 

Home Fields 

Educational Institutions — Allen High School, Asheville, North Carolina; Holding 
Institute, Laredo, Texas; National College for Christian Workers, Kansas 
City, Missouri; Navajo Methodist Mission School, Farmington, New Mexico; 
Pfeiffer College, Misenheimer, North Carolina; Sager-Brown Home and God- 
man School, Baldwin, Louisiana; Sue Bennett College, London, Kentucky; 
Wood Junior College, Mathiston, Mississippi. 

Residence Halls — Friendship Home, Los Angeles, California; Gum Moon Resi- 
dence Hall, San Francisco, California; Mary Elizabeth Inn, San Francisco, 
California; Iowa National Esther Hall, Des Moines, Iowa; Business Girls' 
Inn, Shreveport, Louisiana; Alma Mathews House, New York, New York; 
Flower Esther Hall, Toledo, Ohio; McKelvey Hall, Columbus, Ohio; Esther 
Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio; Young Women's Cooperative Home, Houston, Texas; 
Esther Hall, Salt Lake City, Utah; Esther Hall, Ogden, Utah; Susannah 
Wesley Hall, Newport News, Virginia; Wilson Inn, Richmond, Virginia; 
Killingsworth Home, Columbia, South Carolina. 

Missionary Personnel — Five Guild members have been commissioned during the 
year. Miss Loraine Heath, Miss Winifred Wrisley, and Miss Kathryn Kuhler 
became deaconesses, and Dr. Jean Tarwater and Miss Murden Woods were assigned 
to India as missionaries. However, Miss Woods is taking additional work at 
Syracuse before going to India. Miss Jeanne Wintringham and Miss Patricia Clark 
have gone to Burma to serve as B-3's. Several other Guild members, including one 
conference secretary, Miss Laurinda Hampton, have taken positions in institutions 
in the United States. 

Leadership — This year marks a great change in officers in the Wesleyan Service 
Guild. Many very fine district and conference secretaries have completed their terms 
and have been replaced. There is scarcely an outgoing officer who does not say that 
she did not accomplish nearly as much as she had wished to do. Just as it takes 
stone upon stone to make a building, so it takes the efforts of one after the other 
to help bring about the Kingdom. What one has had to leave undone, the next one 
picks up as a challenge as she begins her work. We say that every member, whether 
she is an officer or not, is very important, and that each one has a responsibility in 
the work of the Guild. We also know that Guild members look to their leaders for 
guidance and a sense of security. Strong leadership has been a great contributing 
factor in the growth and outreach of the Guild. The Guild has been developing a 
program of leadership training that seems to be working effectively. Coaching 
conferences which were an experiment the first year seem to have become an 
accepted feature of the program. A set of suggestions for officer training has been 



Section of Education and Cultivation 183 

used as the basis for the coaching conferences which were attended by 9,425 officers. 
Conference secretaries studied and discussed these suggestions at the jurisdiction 
Schools of Missions and Christian Service, preparatory to holding coaching confer- 
ences with their district secretaries, who, in turn have similar conferences with their 
local officers. This plan was continued for the current year, and an additional set of 
suggestions on program planning has been prepared for the coming year. 

Relationships — Almost everyone who asks the Guild office for a speaker wants 
someone who can give information on the relationship between the Woman's Society 
of Christian Service and the Wesleyan Service Guild. Even a cursory study of the 
bylaws will show the ways in which the Woman's Society and the Guild work to- 
gether with representation on each other's committees. What is less evident, but 
equally as important, is the part the Wesleyan Service Guild takes in the planning 
of the total work of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. Members of the 
standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild serve on planning committees of 
the Woman's Division and the secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild represents 
the Guild on many others. Wherever the Guild interests need to be brought in, the 
Woman's Division is always eager to have Guild representation. One important 
committee which has functioned during the past year is the Committee on Quad- 
rennial Plans. From the very first, the Guild secretary was asked to serve on this 
committee so that the Guild would be sure to have a voice in this planning. The 
Guild secretary is also appointed to committees other than those of the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service. Membership on the Board of Managers of the Joint 
Commission on Missionary Education of the National Council of Churches, and on 
the Methodist Interboard Committee on Missionary Education not only gives the 
Guild a voice in planning the denominational and interdenominational missionary 
education materials, but also the opportunity to contribute to the work of these 
groups. 

Field Worker — Miss E. Louise Nichols came to the staff of the Woman's Division 
in September as a field worker with special emphasis on the Wesleyan Service Guild. 
After a period of orientation in the Guild office, she began an itinerary which has 
taken her to Guild Weekends, Woman's Society meetings, district and conference 
meetings of both Wesleyan Service Guild and Woman's Society, and conference and 
jurisdiction Schools of Missions and Christian Service. In addition to general pro- 
motion and education in the Woman's Society and Guild, Miss Nichols has done 
much to help the Woman's Society and the Guild to understand each other better. 
She is a deaconess and a graduate of National College for Christian Workers, Kansas 
City, Missouri. We are indeed glad to have her with us. 

Loss — Members of the standing committee were deeply shocked and saddened 
during the year by the death of two members, Mrs. Jesse W. Bunch and Mrs. 
Everett Faber. The names of these two fine leaders are mentioned often, not only 
in tribute to them, but because they had so much to offer which is remembered and 
noted by those working in the Guild. We know that the threads of their work are 
interwoven in the program pattern of the Guild, and thus their good work lives 
even though they have left us. 

It has been most interesting to hear the comments of missionaries who attend 
Guild meetings after having been out of the country for several years. They are 
amazed at the growth and the vigor of the Guild. A quote from a letter to the 
office of Field Cultivation from Miss Nina Stallings reads: 

"I do dislike to miss a Guild meeting. These women do so much with their 
little time, are so well informed, work so wisely, and have such potential power and 
leadership, that I feel I owe them all I can give." 



184 

Field Cultivation 

By Harriet Seibert, Secretary 

FAR in advance of the sessions of General Conference and the World Federation 
of Methodist Women, plans were being made for speaking engagements for 

overseas delegates. There were requests especially for the officers of the World 
Federation — Mrs. Ottilia de 0. Chaves, president, and Miss Saturnina Lara, sec- 
retary — and for Mrs. Jose Valencia. These three ladies had been in the United 
States before and had made many friends on their previous visits. The same was true 
of Mrs. Sygne Nyquist for whom friends in Mississippi and Michigan made excellent 
itineration plans. Miss Florence Chen also had a wide hearing in North Central, 
Northeastern, and Southeastern Jurisdictions. 

There has been the usual large demand for missionaries and deaconesses to 
high-light programs of the Woman's Society, the Wesleyan Service Guild, and 
student and youth groups in local churches and at district, conference, and juris- 
diction meetings. 

Our field workers have covered, as always, wide distances geographically. Out- 
standing were the visits of Mrs. W. B. Landrum and Miss Theressa Hoover to two 
of our outposts. Mrs. Landrum went to Hawaii in the summer of 1955 and Miss 
Hoover to Alaska in the spring of 1956. Both gave leadership in the Schools of 
Missions and Christian Service in those Territories. They visited our Methodist 
work in those areas and spoke in local churches as well as at annual conference 
sessions. Enthusiastic reports of the value of these visits have come not only from 
the women but also from the ministers, the district superintendents, and from Bishop 
Raymond Grant. 

In addition Mrs. Landrum taught at the Central Jurisdiction School and in six 
conference schools during the summer; itinerated in the Southeastern Jurisdiction 
in the fall of 1955 and covered all the conference Woman's Society meetings in the 
Western Jurisdiction in the spring. In February she served as a resource person 
for Religious Emphasis Week at Pfeiffer College, Misenheimer, North Carolina, and 
visited five other college campuses for addresses and conferences with students and 
faculty. 

Miss Hoover took part in the Central Jurisdiction School and taught in eight 
conference schools during the summer of 1955 and served as a dean of women at 
the National Youth Conference at Purdue University. She itinerated in two confer- 
ences of Central Jurisdiction, in North Iowa Conference in the fall, and in all 
conferences of Western Jurisdiction in the spring. Careful planning on the part of 
jurisdiction, conference, and district officers brought her into areas which heretofore 
have almost never had guest speakers. 

Miss Mary Searcy, assigned to our office by the Department of Work in For- 
eign Fields, gave leadership during the four weeks of missionary "Houseparties" for 
youth at National College, Kansas City, Missouri, in the summer of 1955. She has 
itinerated in Memphis and Northwest Texas Conferences and participated in con- 
ference and jurisdiction meetings in South Central Jurisdiction. 

Miss Louise Nichols, beginning her work in September, 1955, has been warmly 
received wherever she has spoken. Particularly noteworthy has been the fine under- 
standing she has brought about in relationships between the Wesleyan Service Guild 
and the Woman's Society of Christian Service. 



Section of Education and Cultivation 



185 



Visual Education 

By Elizabeth Marchant, Secretary 

THERE is evidence that audio-visual materials are becoming increasingly impor- 
tant in the study program of the Woman's Societies. Summer Schools of 

Missions are promoting their use more extensively. Over the past year the 
Woman's Division has been engaged in more productions than ever before. An 
immediate objective is the development of skilled audio-visual leaders in each con- 
ference so that these women can conduct workshops and act as resource persons on 
the conference level. Through a questionnaire, more than seventy names have 
been collected. In cooperation with the Television, Radio and Film Commission of 
The Methodist Church, the Woman's Division plans to develop a training program 
so that eventually a Woman's Society representative will also be available for 
membership on each annual conference Television, Radio and Film Commission. 

Productions — Considerable time went into planning for two half-hour color 
films that were completed this year and were premiered at General Conference in 
Minneapolis. The dramatic film, "Reply to Reality," was produced by the Tele- 
vision, Radio and Film Commission for the Board of Missions to help meet the 
urgent need for missionary recruitment. A dramatic-documentary, titled "Heart of 
the Neighborhood," was filmed at Marcy Center, Chicago, by Alan Shilin Films, Inc., 
to portray activities of a representative Woman's Division community center. Two 
filmstrips with reading scripts were completed. "Lily Lai Becomes a Nurse" pictures 
nurse's training at Clara Swain Hospital in Bareilly, India. "Quadrennial Goals, 
1956-1960" is a short filmstrip produced to help secretaries of Promotion present 
the new quadrennial symbol and goals to Woman's Societies and Guilds. 

The Woman's Division has contributed to the production cost and planning of 
the interdenominational films for the 1957-1958 study on Japan and "Christ, the 
Church and Race." 

Workshops — The secretary of Visual Education participated in the following: 
Furloughed Missionaries Conference at Greencastle, Indiana; Twelfth Internationa] 
Audio-Visual Workshop at Green Lake, Wisconsin; National Seminar at Kansas 
City, Missouri; Southwestern Audio-Visual Workshop at Georgetown, Texas. 




Scene from "Reply to Reality" 



Scene from "Heart of the Neigh- 
borhood" 




t 



E 




186 

Student Work 

By Dorothy Nyland, Secretary 

VERY area is a mission field — Every church is a mission 
church — Every Christian is a missionary" — is the quo- 
tation used by the World Christian Community Com- 
mittee of the National Methodist Student Commission in their 
report to the commission. To help students understand the 
significance of this statement is the task of the secretary of 
Student Work as she works with the students across the 
country. As the secretaries of Student Work catch the vision 
of the Spirit of Christ for all of life, they have much to share with those who 
will be the leaders of the church of tomorrow. 

Every Area Is a Mission Field — The carefully selected students, who partici- 
pated in the annual Christian Citizenship Seminar for Students, learned at first 
hand the meaning of the phrase, every area a mission field. They discovered that 
politics and international relations are mission fields as they studied the United 
Nations and our government in Washington. Dr. Kenneth Maxwell of the Depart- 
ment of International Affairs of the National Council of Churches was the co- 
ordinator for the week. He wrote the following statement in the Christian News- 
letter which he edits: 

Throughout the program in briefings, talks and orientation sessions, students 
representing over 30 states, participated in an unusually inspiring experience. Such 
groups and programs give hopeful evidence of student Christian responsibility 
in economic, political, social and international affairs. 

Every Church Is a Mission Church— Every church has a potential leadership 
which needs training. Every church should represent the Family of God which 
includes all people. Over 36,000 students from overseas are now studying in the 
United States. About 100 of them are Crusade Scholars who have come from the 
Methodist Church overseas to share their experience with us. The secretaries of 
Student Work have had the thrill of helping these people find a place in the homes 
and church life of America. In many instances, these friends from abroad have been 
missionaries to us in America. The mission of the church begins where we are. 
For many of the 3,500 students who attended the Student Volunteer Movement 
Quadrennial Conference at Athens, Ohio, during the Christmas holidays, the world- 
wide church became a reality. Over 1,300 students from overseas were there to 
share in "Revolution and Reconciliation." The whole gospel to the whole world took 
on new meaning as they discovered that "every church is a mission church." 

Every Christian Is a Missionary — One of the outstanding events last year was a 
pilot project called a Consultation on Mission Strategy Among College Students, 
held at Turkey Run State Park in Indiana, bringing together representative staff 
from the Board of Missions, the Board of Education, student workers, and faculty 
for three days to discuss the world mission of the church and our relationship to it- 
Student workers and faculty were challenged to return to the campus and present 
the needs of missionary personnel to the students. One of the student workers said, 
"I have come to the conclusion that my campus ministry will not be complete until 
I ask ever}' student I am personally involved with, 'What are you going to do with 
3 T our life — and where and why?' " 

Each one present searched his own life through Bible study, worship, and dis- 
cussion to find out how he could best serve God as a missionary. It was the hope of 
this group that other meetings of this type could be arranged. 



Section of Education and Cultivation 



187 




Youth Work 

By Helen L. Johnson, Secretary 

THE world mission of Christianity is a 
spiritual basis of peace. The purpose of 

Christian Outreach in the Methodist 
Youth Fellowship is to help youth and adult 
leaders understand the world mission of 
Christianity as they become concerned about: 

The world mission of the church (na- 
tional and world missions). 

The ecumenical movement. 

Overseas relief and reconstruction. 

Peace and world order. 
To this end these concerns are integrated into the total program of the MYF, 
including worship, study, and service. 

Mission Study — Missionary education is an important part of the program of 
Christian education of youth. The curriculum for Sunday morning and Sunday 
evening sessions of the MYF always includes missionary units. Illustrations from 
the mission field both at home and abroad are used also to enrich other units of 
study when the illustrations are pertinent. Mission study materials this year were 
related to the interdenominational themes: "Indian Americans," and "The Christian 
Mission in a Revolutionary World." 

The unified program provides for interested girls (seniors and older youth) to 
meet in a study group, World Friendship Group of Girls, to become better 
acquainted with the work of the Woman's Society of Christian Service. The pro- 
gram material for this year was entitled "Missions — Instrument of Peace." 

The Methodist Youth Fund— Through their contributions to the MYFund youth 
share in a program of missions, Christian education, and youth work around the 
world. The receipts for the year closing May 31, 1956, were $629,680.88. 

Work Camp — The Methodist Senior High Work Camp at Erie School, Olive 
Hill, Kentucky, was a cooperative project under the auspices of the Youth Depart- 
ment of the General Board of Education and the Woman's Division of Christian 
Service. The Christian witness of interracial brotherhood was significant. The work 
experiences included digging a foundation for a new crafts building, starting con- 
struction of a tennis court, razing an old shed, cleaning out a ravine for develop- 
ment of a recreational area, laying a brick sidewalk and painting buildings. 

Adult Leadership — There is a constant effort to recruit, train, and motivate 
mature adult Christians to work with youth. The secretary of Youth Work, who 
represents the Woman's Society of Christian Service, often serves as adult adviser 
in Christian Outreach. She is an adult member of the MYF council. Reports indi- 
cate that many local Societies have yet to accept the challenge and elect a secretary. 

Youth Emphasis— The 1955 MYF Fall Action Project on "Missions, World 
Peace, and Overseas Relief" was outstanding in many ways. These three interests 
will be greatly strengthened in many MYF groups. 

A Common Task — Missionary education of youth is a cooperative enterprise. 
Any accomplishments are because of the fine leadership of youth, adult workers, 
secretaries of Youth Work, directors of youth work, and the staff of the Youth 
Department of the General Board of Education. 



188 



Children's Work 

By Ruby Van Hooser, Secretary 

THE year has seen the teachers of children, including the secretaries of Chil- 
dren's Work, hard at work as they have carried forward the program of 
Christian education for the more than two million boys and girls in Methodist 
church schools. The plans made by the most thoughtful of these leaders have been 
concerned also with developing growing experiences in missionary education that 
have continued not only through one or two quarters, but throughout the entire 
period of the twelve months. 

Missionary Emphases — As an integral and effective part of the ongoing curricu- 
lum of the church school, therefore, units of work for primary and junior children 
were written in 1955-56 around the current missionary emphases of "Indian Ameri- 
cans" and "Spreading the Gospel Today." Boys and girls in Sunday school and 
in additional sessions of the church school like to become acquainted with new 
friends in their own country and in countries overseas and to discover some of the 
ways that The Methodist Church is at work among them. Reports reveal the zest 
and the deep interest that children found in this study, and the contribution they 
made to the missionary enterprise through their prayers and gifts. 

The Interboard Committee on Missionary Education representing the Board 
of Education and the Board of Missions, including the Woman's Division of Chris- 
tian Service, reviewing the provisions of the plan for children, found it unnecessary 
to suggest any change in its basic principles. However, changes in division and 
channeling of the Children's Service Fund were adopted. 

Children's Offerings — For the year ending May 31, 1956, the 40 per cent of the 
Children's Service Fund received by the Woman's Division of Christian Service 
amounted to $53,942.56. This reflected the same upward trend that has character- 
ized the fund during the last quadrennium. 

Training Opportunities for Secretaries — With the growth in population and in 
the large number of children in the United States for whom the church has responsi- 
bility for Christian education, the need for well-trained leaders of children on 
conference, district, and local levels has likewise increased and has been given strong 
emphasis by the standing Committee on Children's Work during the past year. 
Conference secretaries are looking forward to attending the jurisdiction Schools of 
Missions in the summer of 1957. Special training opportunities will also be planned 
for district and local secretaries, and other children's workers. 

One Work for Children — During the year secretaries of Children's Work on all 
levels have also reached out, together with other leaders, to minister to the world's 
children in as many ways as possible. They have worked for the prevention of 
juvenile delinquency, and for the protective services to children in their own and 
in other communities. They have become familiar with the needs of public educa- 
tion and supported the measures that would help to meet the needs which they had 
found. They have also stood for the strengthening of the United Nations as it has 
endeavored to meet the needs of children in every country. 

The work of the church for children is one, but loving and skilled leaders repre- 
senting many groups and agencies work together to make it possible. For fellow- 
ship with one another in this task, and for fellowship at the same time with the 
loving Father of all children, secretaries of Children's Work will always be grateful. 



Reports of Editors 189 

Programs and Other Literature 

By Juanita Brown, Editor of Literature 

THE FIELD LITERATURE assigned to this office for 1955-56 was, in some 
ways, the most interesting we have ever been asked to prepare. 

A request for pictures to illustrate A Look at Our City Neighborhood 
Houses in the U. S. A. received a generous response in scores of delightfully 
interesting photographs. This pictorial presentation of Woman's Division work 
was planned for use with the study of "Mission Field: U.S.A.," as was also the 
leaflet From Island to Mainland, which is on our work with Puerto Ricans, and 
was written by Margaret Lilly. 

Training Women Leaders in Southeast Asia, by Mabel Nowlin, a pictorial 
pamphlet for use with the study of Southeast Asia, was boundless in its interest 
to everyone in the office who helped to prepare it for publication. We gained new 
insight into the life of the people of Malaya, Burma, Sumatra in Indonesia, Philip- 
pines, Sarawak in Borneo, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. These far-off places quickened 
our enthusiasm until we found ourselves taking imaginary trips right up the Rejang 
River! We also traveled with the first Filipino deaconess-missionary to Okinawa, 
helped girls in Burma carry timber for their hostel, and for fun sailed island-dotted 
seas, occasionally stopping in picturesque inlets. Long before we had finished the 
leaflet on health work in Sarawak, we felt familiar with even the jungle path that 
leads to the remotest clinic. Mary Devolder's infectious happiness in the writing of 
the biographical sketch of Dr. Rebecca Parrish, founder of Mary Johnston Hospital 
in Manila, delighted our staff. 

In preparing the Program Book and Worship Booklet, we became enchanted 
with the theme: "The Islands Await His Word." Space was inadequate for the 
expression of all the bright ideas on islands which came to us, and the delightful 
selections we wanted to quote. The devoted services of Mrs. Alfredo Nanez and of 
her mother, Mrs. Elida Falcon, made possible for the tenth year the Program 
Book in Spanish. 

Mrs. Robert Garvin, editorial assistant, made a worthy contribution through 
this office to all the printed materials of the past year assigned to the editor of 
Literature. Lisa McGaw, who did the basic work on the 1956 Prayer Calendar, 
designed the Southeast Asia pamphlet; and Robert Schwing, the staff artist, made 
the sketches, including the one on the cover. He also did the art work for the 
Sarawak leaflet and for the Worship Booklet and Program Book. 

In October, Mrs. Theresa Brehm, who had given helpful secretarial service for 
a year, left the board; and on October 15, Miss Mary Devolder came into this office. 

"The Spirit of Christ — for All of Life" expresses the goal of the dedicated 
endeavor of all who, through the printed materials of the Woman's Division, strive 
to bring to members of Woman's Societies and Wesleyan Service Guilds some of His 
spirit. 








Missionary Education and Spiritual Life Literature 

5y Frances Eshelman, Associate Editor of Literature 

PAUL'S MESSAGE, with its emphasis on the fruits of the Spirit, the unity of 
the Church, and the universality of the Kingdom, is singularly apposite to 

both the quadrennial theme of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, and 
the church-wide emphasis on the local church. 

Our publications closely allied to these themes are: the text for the Spiritual 
Life study, Paul's Letters to Local Churches, by Bishop Francis Gerald Ensley; the 
Guide for the study, by Lelia Bagley Rumble; and The Greatest oj These, by Mary 
Clark Tipps, the dramatic worship service. Reasoning Together, a dramatic medi- 
tation on the Resurrection, also owes its impact to Paul's words, "If Christ be not 
risen, then is your faith vain." 

Two inspiring Prayer Cards are: "I Am No Longer My Own," with a prayer 
by John Wesley; and "The Bond of Peace" which pictures a woman at prayer in 
the Meditation Room of the United Nations. 

Praying Through Curtains, by Frank Laubach, calls us to prayer on behalf 
of Christians behind curtains and in other difficult circumstances. 

Ours to Give, by Mrs. J. W. Bunch, brings an earnest reminder of oppor- 
tunities and responsibilities in stewardship from our late secretary of Spiritual Life. 
The Week of Prater and Self-Denial Packet, with its poster, offering envelope, 
Worship Service, Meditation and Service for the Quiet Day, Prayer Card for use 
each day of the week, and Leader's Handbook, describing the year's recipients of 
self-denial giving, should bring inspiration to participants as well as spiritual 
strength and material support to the mission projects. 

Missionary Education literature includes Study and Action for 1956-57, which 
contains information on the Approved Study courses. It suggests action to follow 
each study, and lists the assignments to jurisdictions of projects which may receive 
gifts following study. 

The fine contribution by Mrs. Maud H. Lynch, editorial assistant, has added 
to the value of all of these publications and is sincerely appreciated. 

The Handbook on Missionary Education and Service, the Handbook on Spiritual 
Life, the leaflet Spiritual Life Cultivation, summarizing the responsibilities of secre- 
taries of Spiritual Life, and the leaflet, Questions and Answers on Missionary Edu- 
cation have been newly revised. 

190 



Reports of Editors 



191 



World Friendship Group Programs and Other Materials 

By Alyce L'Heritier, Associate Editor of Literature 



<* M 






of*' 



to 



a* 



|>A 6 



i&m£umnzi J 



" A NNUAL REPORT time" usually leads to a review of past 
J^\_ reports. A review of the reports of the past nine years 
caused this editor to realize that one significant phase of 
editing has never been mentioned. That is the contribution of 
the artist. Yet how important this is! Frequently an eye- 
catching cover makes you pick up a book or pamphlet; the 
next step, reading it, is not a great one. 

So this year this Associate Editor decided to let you have 
another look at a few of last year's exceptionally attractive 
covers and indirectly to express gratitude to the many artists 
who labored over them, listening to seemingly impossible 
specifications, accepting criticism, and making revisions until 
the cover best suited to the subject matter had been created. 
The cover of Bridges to Understanding, the program book for 
World Friendship Groups, had to bridge the gap between 
East and West, because the programs emphasized the inter- 
denominational study themes, "Southeast Asia" and "Mission 
Field: U.S.A." The cover of Commissioned to Serve required 
a rustic touch since this booklet interprets representative 
projects of Town and Country Work. The cover of Getting 
to Know You hints at the importance of getting acquainted 
with students and visitors from other lands and suggests ways 
of doing so. Going Somewhere? a leaflet designed to attract 
high school students to missionary service, introduces on the 
cover a pixie, who leads an inquiring student through the nec- 
essary phases in the direction of a missionary career. Finally 
we see an abstract drawing on the cover of A Workshop for 
World Understanding. An abstraction provides variety and is 
particularly useful when a leaflet has a long and, to the artist, 
unwieldy, title. 

It seems a pity not to show you the attractive covers of 
many other materials which have been the responsibility of 
this Associate Editor in the past year, but perhaps these 
samples will lead you to look up the others. The clue to 
finding them is that these covers are on materials on Mission- 
ary Personnel, Youth Work, field work in India, Pakistan, and 
Latin America and in the areas of Town and Country, Educa- 
tional Institutions, Social Welfare and Medical Work, and 
(with the exception of the study book and guide) Christian 
Social Relations. Do look them up in the list following the 
editorial reports, read them and I'm sure that you, too, will 
give a vote of thanks to that indispensable individual, the 
artist. 



192 

World Outlook and Joint Literature 

By Dorothy McConnell, Editor 

THE past year has been a year of special issues for World Outlook. The first 
special issue, in February, was on India. It commemorated the one hundredth 

anniversary of Methodism in India and was first presented at the annual 
meeting of the Board of Missions. Pictures of India, articles on India's present and 
future, and stories from the field were featured. It was the first time World Outlook 
had ever given a whole issue to one field. The India issue was sent to India at once, 
and the criticism came back that this or that piece of work was not mentioned. 

At the time of General Conference another special issue was prepared with 
the story of the past four years in the mission fields. This issue took the place of 
the annual report issue which has appeared in the last few years after the annual 
meeting of the board. Again the cry was raised that not enough attention or space 
was given to this or that piece of work. 

Now World Outlook is a straight missionary paper. The person who sub- 
scribes to World Outlook subscribes because he or she is interested in the mission- 
ary program of the church. Therefore, when the persistent cry is raised that not 
enough space and attention is given to some phase of work, the cry is heard. It was 
decided, after consultation with members of the Board of Missions, to meet the need 
in part by adding more pages to the magazine. This was decided at a time when 
printing costs were going up. But by certain economies within the budget the 
editors found they could bring the magazine up from forty-eight to sixty-four pages 
for at least six months of the year. 

This plan has gone forward. The first issue with the increased number of pages 
was in October, 1956. It coincided with the drive for renewals of combination 
subscriptions in the Woman's Societies of Christian Service and the drive for 
World Outlook in the Commission on Missions. Two special features were added 
in the October issue and have been continued since. 

One is the use of editorials on pages set aside for editorials. 

The other is the provision of space for late news from the field. This is accom- 
plished by holding open four pages of The Moving Finger until after the first proof 
comes in. The latest news is set up on these pages. This plan gives a monthly paper 
some of the advantages of a weekly. 

The study book this year is High Hours of Methodism in Town-Country Com- 
munities. Although the study year is not under way as we go to press, the book is 
attracting a great deal of attention. Other church papers are advertising it, and 
letters are beginning to come into the office showing interest in the book. It looks 
at this moment as if the study will be one of the most popular we have had for 
many years. 

In the field of literature, the little leaflets on Sumatra, Borneo, Formosa and 
Hong Kong, Malaya, and the Philippines have been in great demand. This is, of 
course, because of the study on Southeast Asia. The compact little leaflets on home 
and foreign work — just the size to put into an envelope — prepared often with the 
closest cooperation with administrative secretaries, have been useful in summer 
schools and institutes. This type of service will be continued. 

Television, movies, and radio are wonderful methods for carrying on the story 
of a work. But still there is nothing to equal the printed word. The work of this 
office is to print the word in journal, text, and leaflet. It is hoped that the word of 
a mission may perhaps become mission work in itself. 



Reports of Editors 193 

The Methodist Woman 

By Mrs. C. A. Meeker. Editor 

1955-1956 was a short work year for me. It began with my sabbatical leave 
of three months which I elected to spend in purposeful travel. The purpose was 
to rest, visit mission stations, become acquainted with and gain a better under- 
standing of life in other countries and, of course, do a little sightseeing on the side. 

All this was accomplished on my cruise to the Orient, Life on shipboard 
was relaxing. And I saw much of our work in that area, for I spent a little more 
than three weeks in Japan, the same amount of time in the Philippines, with 
two days each in Hong Kong and Honolulu, returning to New York City just 
in time for the September meeting of the Executive Committee of the Woman's 
Division. 

Issues of The Methodist Woman had been planned in advance. With their 
usual efficiency and real sense of responsibility, Miss Mary Blake, editorial assistant, 
and Miss Dorothy Brow, the editorial secretary, carried through the plans so 
well that no one missed me. 

In contrast to the exciting days of travel in faraway places, the rest of the 
year was prosaic. The work schedule left very few breathing spaces on my calendar. 
Editing and proofreading the Sixteenth Annual Report, in addition to The Meth- 
odist Woman, took stick-to-itiveness to the task during the fall months. 

As usual, though, a few meetings were sandwiched in between the staggered 
deadlines. I attended the Interboard Committee on Missionary Education in 
Cincinnati, Ohio; the Assembly of United Church Women and the Conference on 
the Churches and Social Welfare, both of which were held in Cleveland, Ohio. 
And I spoke at the New York District meeting. 

General Conference year always brings added chores such as editing the 
quadrennial report for the Woman's Division and planning a special issue of The 
Methodist Woman. The comments on the May issue compensated for the extra 
work. 

Looking toward the new quadrennium, we began early to revise the Record 
and Re-port Books, the district and conference blanks for all lines of work, the 
Handbook for Promotion, and A Guide. While practically finished in April, these 
pieces of material could not be completed until the proposed legislation was voted 
by General Conference, so they did not appear in this fiscal year. 

However, with that much work well in hand, I was able to fill a few speaking 
dates. Early in April I spoke at the annual meeting of the Minnesota Conference 
Woman's Society. It was a privilege later in the month to attend General Con- 
ference in Minneapolis. Following that event, I went westward for the annual 
meeting of the Oregon Conference Woman's Society and to speak at a few smaller 
gatherings. So though a short work year, 1955-1956 was fully packed with work 
and enriching experiences. 



194 



Literature Headquarters 



By Mrs. E. LeRoy Stiffler, Publication and Business Manager, and 
Mrs. C. C. Long, Circulation Manager and Secretary of Literature 

THE report of 1951-1952 carried an account of the move into the new building 
of Literature Headquarters. The statement was made at that time that this 

move was made necessary by unprecedented increases in sales of literature, 
orders for free literature, and subscriptions to The Methodist Woman, increases 
due to the consecrated efforts of members of the Woman's Society from local through 
jurisdiction, and the cooperation of Division members, as well as the entire staff. 

Even though we have experienced a 52 per cent increase in receipts from sales 
of literature during the quadrennium 1952-1956 over the previous quadrennium and 
the subscription list to The Methodist Woman has increased by approximately 
55,000 subscribers, the building has proved adequate. The original planning of the 
building provided for anticipated growth in both departments and proved both 
efficient and practical in meeting the increased volume of work except for storage 
facilities. 

In November, 1955, the final payment on the original loan of $175,000 was 
made to the treasurer of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, just four years 
and four months from the date of occupancy, July, 1951. 

At the annual meeting of the Woman's Division in January, 1956, authorization 
for approximately 3,000 square feet of additional warehouse space was granted. The 
new addition was ready for occupancy May 15, 1956, in time for the influx of new 
materials for 1956-1957. 




(A) Receipts from sale of literature on a quadrennial basis. (B) Receipts from 
subscriptions to THE METHODIST WOMAN and combination subscriptions to 
THE METHODIST WOMAN and WORLD OUTLOOK on a quadrennial basis. 



Literature Headquarters 195 

Records show that over 76,000,000 pieces of literature were handled during 
the past four years, an increase of 26,000,000 over the previous quadrennium. This 
included materials bearing the imprint of the Woman's Division of Christian 
Service, The Methodist Woman, office forms, materials published by the Joint 
Commission on Missionary Education, and other publications pertinent to the 
program of the Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

At the end of the fiscal year, May 31, 1956, receipts from sales of literature 
totaled approximately $641,600, an increase of $70,000 over the previous year. 
Excess assets over liabilities totaled $455,000, an increase of approximately $150,000 
over the previous year. 

The appreciable increase is due in no small measure to the secretaries of Litera- 
ture and Publications on all levels, who have cooperated most effectively in the use 
of materials sent out from the office of the Circulation Manager and Secretary of 
Literature of the Woman's Division. These materials included the Display Packets 
with directions for their assembling and use, Catalogue 1955-56, Sample Promotion 
Order blanks, fliers promoting the program materials, and leaflets promoting the 
sale of special materials. Attendance of the Circulation Manager and Secretary 
of Literature as a speaker at many banquets planned by the various conferences has 
been a part of the year's activities. 

Week of Prayer packets (more than 36,000) were prepared for local Woman's 
Societies and Wesleyan Service Guild units and mailed in quantity to the conference 
secretaries of Literature and Publications. 

The Record and Report Books for local, district, and conference were sent to 
the district secretaries of Promotion for distribution. 

The value of material sent on consignment to summer schools in 1955 was 
$86,720. Sales at the schools totaled $56,645. 

Materials valued at $197,000 were sent on all consignment orders including 
summer schools. Sales on these materials totaled $113,000. 

Individual invoices for materials purchased 1955-56 totaled $127,758.29. Of this 
amount, $118,464.17 has been received for credit during the year. 

An analysis of sales for 1955-56: 

This Revolutionary Faith 36,000 

Within Two Worlds 51,800 

An Introduction to Five Spiritual Classics 72,000 

To Combine Our Efforts for Lasting Peace 32,000 

Program Book— To the End of the Earth 150,000 

Worship Booklet 205,000 

My Date Book 477,000 

Prayer Calendar 28,300 

Study and Action, 1955-56 100,000 

Activities for 1955-56 80,000 

Youth Program Book — Missions — Instrument of Peace 6,300 

Sixteenth Annual Report 23,000 

Week of Prayer, 1955 

Envelopes 1,000,000 

Posters 40,000 

Leader's Handbook 70,000 

Prayer Card 600,000 

Meditations and Plans for a Quiet Day 112,000 

Worship Service for Program Meeting 325,000 



196 

Production 

During the year the production department has worked at top speed to keep 
pace with the materials prepared for publication by the editors. We handled 162 
manuscripts and reprint orders during the year. This includes The Methodist 
Woman as well as other publications bearing the imprint of the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service. The planning and production of office forms, catalogues, and 
promotion materials are also handled in the production office. Estimates from 
printers, purchases of paper, handling of engravings, estimating the number of 
each item to be printed, and setting prices on paid materials is all part of the 
work in the production office. 

The Methodist Woman 

The annual drive for new combination subscriptions to The Methodist 
Woman and World Outlook took the form of a Conducted Tour and Visitation and 
was observed by the local Societies of six jurisdictions in cooperation with a total 
church visitation by World Outlook. The plan included the use of a ticket bearing 
the names of the countries where the Woman's Division is at work — an educational 
factor as well as a real inducement to take such an extended tour for $2.30. 

Southeastern Jurisdiction retained the jurisdiction banner; also Florida Con- 
ference of the Southeastern Jurisdiction kept the conference banner. The district 
banner was regained from San Bernardino District, of the Southern California- 
Arizona Conference of the Western Jurisdiction, by Sarasota District of the Florida 
Conference. Therefore all the award banners were won by the Southeastern Juris- 
diction for the most new combination subscriptions. Two Societies of the South- 
eastern Jurisdiction, one of the South Central, and one of the North Central won 
the awards of a combination subscription to The Methodist Woman and World 
Outlook. 

As of May 31, 1956, the subscription list for The Methodist Woman was 
300,000 subscribers, an increase of approximately 15,000 over the previous years. 

The fulfillment of a task so large in scope could not be accomplished without the 
loyalty and good will of the supervisors in charge of the various sections, as well as 
the entire staff. The concern on the part of the entire staff of both The Methodist 
Woman and Literature Headquarters to render efficient service, to keep down 
unnecessary expenditures, to share the responsibilities, to correct the few mistakes 
which in human endeavor are inevitable, and to maintain the general spirit of 
unity and interest which is the observation and comment of all visitors to Literature 
Headquarters is of utmost gratification and deeply appreciated. This spirit is in 
no small measure the secret of the success of both departments. 

Literature of the Woman's Division of Christian Service 

June 1, 1955— May 31, 1956 
Christian Social Relations 

Activities jor 1956-67 

A Workshop jor World Understanding 

Getting to Know You 

I Lift My Lamp 

We, The Church (play) 

You Are There 

Youth in a Responsible Society — A Christian's Concern (Study Book) 

Guide for Youth in a Responsible Society — A Christian's Concern 



Literature Headquarters 197 

Field Cultivation 

Introducing Miss E. Louise Nichols 

Field — Foreign 

Health Work in Sarawak on Borneo 

Rebecca Parrish, A Medical Missionary in Manila 

Southeast Asia 

Training Women Leaders in Southeast Asia 

Field — Home 

A Look at Our City Neighborhood Houses in the U. S. A. 

Commissioned to Serve 

From Island to Mainland — Puerto Ricans and the Woman's Division of 

Christian Service 

Finance 

Annuity Dollars Make a Difference 
Appropriations for June 1, 1956, to May 31, 1957 
Membership Pledge Card 

Library Service 

Book List 

Missionary Education and Service 

Jurisdiction Recognition Blank and Card 
Questions and Answers on Missionary Education 1 
Report of Study Class Applying for Recognition 
Study and Action, 1956-57 

Missionary Personnel 

Best in the Business (play) 
Going Somewhere? 
Go Ye 

Organization and Promotion 

A Widening Way l 

Circles l 

Membership Card 

My Date Book 

Oh Yes You Can! 1 

Record and Report Book for the Woman's Society of Christian Service in 

the Local Church 
Record and Report Books (District and Conference) 
Report Blanks 
Transfer Card 

Programs 

Program Book, 1956-57 — The Islands Await His Word 
Worship Booklet, The Islands Await His Word 
Programas Misioneros (Spanish Program Book) 



198 

Spiritual Life 

"I Am No Longer My Own But Thine" (Prayer Card) 

Ours to Give 

Paul's Letters to Local Churches (Study Book) 

Guide to Paul's Letters to Local Churches 

Prayer Calendar 

Praying Through Curtains 1 

Pray Without Ceasing 

Reasoning Together 

Spiritual Life Cultivation 

Spiritual Life Packet, 1956-57 

The Bond of Peace (Prayer Card) 

"The Greatest of These . . ." 

Week of Prayer and Self-Denial Packet for 1956: 

Poster, gift envelope, prayer card 

Meditation and Prayers for the Quiet Day — The Eternal Questions of 
Christ 

Worship Service for the Program Meeting — Teach Me, Lord, That I 
May Teach 

Leader's Handbook 

Student Work 

Information Card * 

Our Students in Other Lands 1 

Why Bother? l 

Supply Work 

Does It Count? 1 

Wesleyan Service Guild 

Record and Report Book for the Local Secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild 
Record and Report Book for the Treasurer of the Wesleyan Service Guild 
Wesleyan Service Guild — For Employed Women 

Visual Education 

Heart of the Neighborhood, (flier) 

Youth 

Bridges to Understanding (Program Book) 

General 

Sixteenth Annual Report 

Trazando Tus Pisadas Diligentemente 

Joint Literature 

Annual Report 

Directory of Methodist Missions Overseas 
Methodism and New India 
Methodism in Latin America 

1 Revised. 



Literature Headquarters 199 

Financial Report of the Publication Manager 

MRS. E. LEROY STIFFLER 

LITERATURE HEADQUARTERS 

of the 

WOMAN'S DIVISION OF CHRISTIAN SERVICE 

HALANCE SHEET, May 31, 1956 

ASSETS 
Cash and postage stamps on hand $ 320.81 

Demand deposits: 
Cincinnati : 

Regular account $ 18,550.89 

Payroll account 500.00 

New York branch account 573.42 

San Francisco branch account 1,075.26 

20,699.57 

$ 21,020.38 

Accounts receivable, customers 18,097.51 

Inventories, at cost 212,910.40 

Total current assets $252,028.29 

Fixed assets, at cost : 

Land and land improvements $ 30,983.40 

Building $278,693.55 

Furniture and fixtures 80,317.45 

Automobile 1,800.00 

$360,811.00 
Less, allowance for depreciation 74,981.07 

285,829.93 

316,813.33 



Total assets $568,841.62 

LIABILITIES 
Accounts payable $114,069.26 

NET WORTH 

Balance, June 1, 1955 $302,617.04 

Add: Cancellation by Board of Missions and Church Extension 

of The Methodist Church of non-interest bearing note 70,000.00 

Excess of income over expenses, for the year ended May 31, 

1956, as annexed 82,155.32 

454,772.36 

$568,841.62 



200 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 

for the year ended May 31, 1956 

Sales: 

Cincinnati $584,047.66 

New York 27,035.92 

San Francisco 30,483.32 

$641,566.90 

Appropriation for free literature from National Treasurer 59,000.00 



Total operating income $700,566.90 

Cost of goods sold, as annexed $343,184.77 

Cost of free literature 35,178.07 

Mailing charges, postage, and express 58,498.92 

Salaries and wages 111,471.18 

Depreciation 14,632.56 

Expenses, as annexed : 

Office 20,966.52 

Other 34,628.19 

Total operating expense 618,560.21 



Excess of operating income over expenses $ 82,006.69 

Other income 148.63 



Excess of income over expenses $ 82,155.32 



COST OF GOODS SOLD 
for the year ended May 31, 1956 

Inventory, June 1, 1955 $162,731.55 

Purchases: 

Printing and electros $176,49856 

Art work 2,383.36 

Manuscripts 5,638.00 

Study books 141,740.71 

Other books and leaflets. 45,266.12 

Gift boxes, wrappings, and pins 21,837.17 

393,363.62 

$556,095.17 
Less, inventory May 31, 1956 212,910.40 



$343,184.77 



Literature Headquarters 

THE METHODIST WOMAN 
STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

for the year ended May 31, 1956 

Receipts : 

Subscriptions : 

The Methodist Woman, single $173,86224 

The Methodist Woman, combination re- 
ceived from World Outlook 20,756.55 

World Outlook, combination $222,203.70 

Less, payments made to World Out- 
look 137,130.40 

85,073.30 

World Outlook, single $ 15,281.00 

Less, payments made to World Out- 
look 15,567.15 

* 286.15 

Other 4,824.96 

Disbursements: 

Cost of publication: 

Printing, binding, and electros $177,661.16 

Postage and mailing 10,196.49 

Circulation department expenses : 

Postage $ 7,154.42 

Expiration cards 2,692.48 

Office expense 2,178.29 

Mail list : 

Tabulating cards 992.20 

Paper 524.86 

Service and supplies 371.93 

13,914.18 

Equipment purchased 8,681.10 

Salaries 54,341.68 

Telephone and telegraph 840.13 

Auditing 250.00 

Insurance 605.30 

Equipment rental and service 13,488.42 

Social security taxes 1,080.58 

Bank charges 649.05 

Maintenance and supplies 166.37 

Other expense 955.61 

Excess of receipts over disbursements 

Balance, June 1, 1955: 

Demand deposits $ 30,903.28 

Cash on hand and postage stamps 151.87 

Balance, May 31, 1956: 

Demand deposits $ 32,308.94 

Cash on hand and postage stamps 147.04 

Accounts Payable 

Balance, May 31, 1956 



201 



$284,230.90 



282,830.07 
$ 1,400.83 



31,055.15 



$ 32,455.98 



$ 28,155.13 



* Denotes red figure. 



202 



Missionary Personnel 

By Alpharetta Leeper and Marguerite Twinem, Secretaries 

THE theme for this quadrennium is particularly fitting for those who have a 
specific concern for missionary personnel. This fact is brought into focus when 

we recall that "The Spirit of Christ — for All of Life" is primary for any candi- 
date who seeks to give service within the mission program of the church. 

Although the secretaries of Missionary Personnel have been in contact with 
many young women throughout the past quadrennium, the results do not reveal as 
heartening a picture as would be desired. During 1952-1956, 89 regular and 103 
short-term foreign missionaries have taken up their work overseas, while 3 home 
missionaries and 41 deaconesses have been commissioned for service in the United 
States and 119 U.S.-2's have entered our program. It is our hope that the period 
now before us will yield an increase far beyond the goal which we have set for our- 
selves — 100 foreign, 100 home workers per year. 

There is much ground for the hope just expressed. The growth and under- 
standing which has developed regarding the interdependent relationship existing 
among the district and conference secretaries of Missionary Personnel and Student 
Work indicate that progress in the cultivation of interest among our young people 
should show a marked increase in the realm of missionary recruitment. The General 
Conference action providing for the strengthening of the role of the Committee on 
Christian Vocations should also lift up the importance of education in this field as 
it relates to both the local and the conference situation. Thus people throughout 
the church should be encouraged to seek guidance from Rev. Richard Belcher of 
the Interboard Committee on Christian Vocations as they undertake to counsel 
youth in the choice of a life work. 

Further hope is found when one realizes that the Missionary Personnel staff 
has been increased to provide for broader and deeper cultivation of interested youth 
and young adults throughout the total church. Two associate secretaries, Rev. Paul 
Yount and Miss Jane Stentz, joined the staff to work with undergraduates who 
have expressed an interest in missionary service. Promotional contacts with key 
people and with various publications of the church also will be part of their 
responsibility. Another person whose work is bringing a hopeful note to the office 
of Missionary Personnel is Miss Anita Harris, who joined the staff in early spring 
to present the missionary challenge to young adults. The work that she is doing 
complements in a fine way the cultivation developed on college campuses during the 
past few years through visits of field secretaries. Miss Joan Warneka and Mr. Lee 
Cooper, both former special-term missionaries, served effectively in this role during 
the past year. 

A genuine concern for an effective presentation of the opportunities for overseas 
mission service resulted in the production of the film, "Reply to Reality." It is 
hoped that youth everywhere will be caught up by its message and face anew their 
own responsibility to Christ and His Church. 

Now, a new quadrennium stretches before us with its message of hope and 
opportunity. It is only as those of us who are concerned with the strengthening of 
the Church of Christ work together in fellowship and unity that we shall bring 
into the stream of its life new workers committed to the task of making real 
the spirit of Christ for all of life. 



203 

Reports of Standing Committees 

Missionary Personnel 

By Mrs. Alan K. Laing, Chairman 

THIS is both the close of a year and the close of a quadrennium. During the 
quadrennium there have been continuing numbers of young women commis- 
sioned for missionary service at home and abroad. We give thanks for the 
dedication of each one of these lives. We know that the Lord needs many others. 

Consultation 

The year just past has witnessed three significant developments. First, on 
October 12-15 at Turkey Run, Indiana, the first consultation of the Board of 
Missions and the Board of Education was held, involving about forty persons 
directly concerned with students and their recruitment for missionary service. The 
results in terms of interpretation and understanding of the mission of the church 
and the call to missionary service were both exciting and full of promise. As a pilot 
project it has proved not only the value of such a consultation, but indeed a positive 
need for others like it. 

Young Adults 

Second, we have this year entered for the first time the heretofore scarcely 
touched area of young adults. There has been increasing evidence that young 
adults wish to give their lives in service to their Master through the channels of 
the church. Many of them lack information as to how to proceed. In January, 
1956, a step in the direction of meeting this need was taken with the employment 
of Miss Anita Harris, formerly serving in South America, to give full time to recruit- 
ment among young adults. Through the cooperation of the Board of Education, 
Miss Harris has been received enthusiastically at young adult week ends, camps, 
and conferences. We need to consider carefully the advisability and desirability 
of expanding our effort in this area. 

Film: "Reply to Reality" 

Third, a new film on recruitment entitled "Reply to Reality" has been prepared 
and is now ready. It should be used widely in student and youth groups and also 
in adult groups. It is available at The Methodist Publishing House. 

Although in the 1952-56 quadrennium we reached for dreams not yet achieved 
with respect to the number of young women deciding to enter missionary service, 
we have been able to send reinforcements to those already beyond their time of 
retirement, and to strengthen thinly manned projects. 

The standing Committee on Missionary Personnel in this final report for the 
quadrennium expresses its gratitude to Miss Marguerite Twinem and Miss Alpha- 
retta Leeper for their devoted guidance; to Mr. Richard Belcher for his cooperation, 
and to all secretaries of Missionary Personnel and others who have helped to lead 
young women into missionary service. 

Together we shall continue to strive for the spirit of Christ for all of life. 



204 



Permanent Funds and Investments 

By Mrs. F. C. Reynolds, Chairman 

DURING THE FISCAL YEAR June 1, 1955-May 31, 1956, the total funds 
of the Woman's Division of Christian Service invested in bonds and stocks 
have changed from $20,531,362.74 (book value) to $20,610,810.52 (book 
value). The Irving Trust Company of New York acts as investment adviser and 
custodian of invested funds of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. For the 
year ending May 31, 1956, the amount paid for this advisory-custodian service 
was $20,420.13. The Permanent Fund which, by vote of the Woman's Division, is 
now guaranteed 3 per cent interest yearly, has been able to meet from its own 
earnings this interest payment. 

For the seventh consecutive year the Woman's Division has this year made a 
distribution of interest on the Designated Temporary Funds to the several depart- 
ments of the Woman's Division at the rate of 3 per cent. This interest amounted 
to $372,171.73 and was allocated to the departments on a pro rata basis according 
to the amount held for each department in the fund. 

During the year interest at the rate of 3^2 per cent on the Pension Funds 
was distributed. The amount was $137,722.00. 

As of May 31, 1956, investments in mortgages were held by the Woman's Divi- 
sion as follows: Permanent Funds, $995,666.25; Pension Funds, $340,740.00; and 
Designated Temporary Funds, $2,121.80. These mortgages are serviced by Cruik- 
shank Company at a total service fee of $2,782.20. 

The last analysis of the investment portfolio as of May 31, 1956, showed that 
the securities are divided as follows: Bonds, 48.66 per cent; Preferred Stocks, 4.07 
per cent; Common Stocks, 43.78 per cent. The interest yield at purchase price 
is 3.81 per cent, compared with 3.83 per cent last year. 

The Woman's Division is indebted to all of the members of the Committee on 
Permanent Funds and Investments, both elected and coopted, for their unfailing 
interest in, and careful attention to, the work of the committee. Gratitude is also 
expressed to Mr. Edward Veitch and Mr. Morgan MacDonald of the Irving Trust 
Company for their counsel and advice in dealing with the problems of this committee. 

World Federation of Methodist Women 

By Mrs. Paul Arrington, Chairman 

THE last year has been by far the busiest of the past eight years for the 
chairman. Also, it has been the most satisfying one. Interest and interpreta- 
tion have greatly exceeded any previous year. Methodist women all over 
America are making contacts with Methodist women of thirty-four countries, and 
a greater tie of friendship is resulting. 

Woman's Societies and circles have woven the World Federation into the 
regular programs in such a manner that members are experiencing the true ecu- 
menical relationship. If one senses a unity of spirit with Methodists in other lands 
she likewise comes to appreciate the common bond of all believers. 

The creative ability of our constituency continually amazes me. The reports 
this year have indicated remarkable creativity in this area of work. Methods and 
techniques for interpretation have been very varied. Mimeographed sheets of 
various techniques used have been mailed to every conference. 



Standing Committees 205 

At the last meeting of the standing Committee of the World Federation of 
Methodist Women it was decided, through the cooperation of the editor, to in- 
corporate the quarterly news-sheet in The Methodist Woman. The first one 
appeared in the September issue. This change has met with enthusiastic response. 

Our thoughts and most of our time have been given to the plans and prepara- 
tion for the Quadrennial Assembly at Lake Junaluska, North Carolina, in August, 
1956. The Woman's Division and the jurisdictions cooperated most graciously and 
generously; the committees worked well; the local people could not have been 
excelled. Tribute must be paid to Dr. Elmer T. Clark and the World Methodist 
Council for most excellent help and cooperation. 

With the close of the quadrennium we have come to the end of one period in 
the fife of the World Federation of Methodist Women. It has truly been a growing 
and convincing period. The Federation has proven its worth; it has convinced the 
women of the church of its potentialities. The international situation, the shrinking 
world, the widening global relationships, the growth of the Christian world com- 
munity — in other words, the facts we face today all indicate a place and need for 
such an organization. This new quadrennium will see it broaden and deepen its 
influence to make the spirit of Christ more meaningful for all of life. 

Spiritual Life 

By Mrs. H. C. Leonard, Chairman 

TO ENDEAVOR to quicken the spiritual life of Methodist women is the primary 
objective of the Committee on Spiritual Life. This is a great responsibility. 

However, it is encouraging to note the increased understanding of the responsi- 
bility and the opportunities facing the secretaries and their committees as they go 
forward in this challenging endeavor. 

Gratitude and appreciation are expressed to the jurisdiction secretaries, our 
editor, Miss Frances Eshelman, and all members of the standing Committee on 
Spiritual Life who have so efficiently assisted the chairman with the responsibility 
assumed since the tragic death of Mrs. J. W. Bunch. The progress made this year 
in a number of phases of Spiritual Life cultivation is largely due to the previous 
planning by Mrs. Bunch and the able secretaries who have executed the plans. 

One of the high points was the meeting of the standing Committee on Spiritual 
Life which was held in January, 1956, at Buck Hill Falls, Pennsylvania. This was the 
first meeting of the enlarged committee. Each member considered it a valuable 
experience as together we recognized our needs and opportunities for new growth. 

Among the things accomplished were the revision of the Handbook for Secre- 
taries of Spiritual Life, also the revision and coordination of the report blanks on 
all levels, setting up a suggested Calendar of Activities for the year and working 
out plans for implementing the new quadrennial goals. 

Special emphasis, this year, was placed on the significance of worship as an 
experience rather than a mere form. As a result, secretaries report increases in care- 
fully planned worship services and the use of the Worship Booklet. 

Plans for more efficient promotion and better method for reporting the Fellow- 
ship of Intercession are under way. September is to be the month for this emphasis 
and the time for re-enrollment. Additional members are to be reported each 
October, February, and June. 

Among the new pieces of literature available for Spiritual Life cultivation are: 
Ours to Give, a meditation on stewardship by Mrs. J. W. Bunch; Praying Through 



206 

Curtains, by Frank C. Laubach; The Greatest of These, by Mary Clark Tipps — a 
playlet for use with the Spiritual Life study; Spiritual Life Bibliography, revised; 
Spiritual Life Cultivation, revised. 

The study, An Introduction to Five Spiritual Classics, has been spiritually 
enriching. One jurisdiction secretary reported, "The Classics have done more to 
reach the hearts of the women than any recent study." Another wrote, "Many 
are using the Classics for daily devotions and find them increasingly helpful." Paul's 
Letters to Local Churches, the study for 1956-57, should be equally helpful as we 
endeavor to increase our understanding of the mind of Christ and see anew His 
Church in her ministry of reconciliation. 

Perhaps the most needed and worth-while increase has been in the interest of 
prayer. On reports we read: more prayer groups, Quiet Days, spiritual retreats, 
twenty-four-hour prayer vigils in cooperation with the conference Board of Evan- 
gelism and a greater support of the Week of Prayer and Self-Den ial. Thus Meth- 
odist women are seeking to know the spirit of Christ and by His spirit, to be 
strengthened in the inner life. 



Literature and Publications 

By Mrs. Frank G. Bell, Chairman 

IN THE introduction to his book, Love or Perish, Dr. Smiley Blanton makes this 
statement: "I believe that it is possible to achieve an emotional change with the 
insight developed through books. Books can make a change in one's philosophy 
and attitude toward life." If we substitute for "books" the words "literature of the 
Woman's Division," we will have the proper relationship of our written materials 
to the spirit of Christ for all of life. 

All of the literature is planned with the needs of the women in the local 
Society in mind. For example, the monthly programs are built with the thought of 
keeping world problems and trends before the women of the church, and showing 
how the missionary enterprise is taking a responsible place in giving a Christian 
answer to problems and needs. 

It is important to remember that the relationship of the local Society to the 
literature is a two-way relationship. Not only is it planned for them, but they help 
to plan it. The letters that come from Woman's Societies, districts, conferences, and 
jurisdictions either to the committee directly, or through referrals from the Woman's 
Division, are all carefully considered. The suggestions, or requests, contained in 
them are followed if at all possible. A good illustration of the outgrowth of many 
requests for an over-all picture of the work of Methodist women around the world 
is the book, Declaring His Glory, by Eloise Woolever. 

A survey of the literature produced, a list of which may be found elsewhere in 
this report, will show the scope of the work done. There are the materials such as 
handbooks, report blanks, and the like, that aid in making a more effective Society; 
and there are those materials that can bring about the "emotional change" through 
a better knowledge of people and problems. These include study books and leaflets 
on the work at home and around the world, and on current problems, national and 
international. 

For the motivation of that "emotional change" that will bring about the spirit 



Standing Committees 207 

of Christ for all of life, we have Spiritual Life materials. Nor are these materials 
limited to adults; they include some for children, youth, and students, with an 
appeal for recruitment of missionary personnel. 

As the committee brings to a close its work for the quadrennium it is aware, 
anew, of the intellectual gifts, the consecration and work-filled hours that are the 
contribution of our editors, publication and business manager, and circulation 
manager, and secretary of Literature. For these women and the excellent literature 
they produce, we are deeply grateful. 



Library Service 

By Mrs. C. P. Hardin, Chairman 

THROUGH the Committee on Library Service of the Woman's Division of 
Christian Service, books and magazines are made available to all of the projects 

under the Department of Work in Home Fields and to all of the households 
in the Department of Work in Foreign Fields without expense to the workers. 
Workers have the privilege of selecting books from the Book List compiled by the 
committee each year. In 1955 the fist contained ISO titles. The workers may also 
request magazines or books not on the Book List. 

The year 1955 marked the highest return on requests for Library Service. 
Appropriations for 1955 allowed an average of five books to be sent to the house- 
holds in the foreign fields and an average of four books for the projects of the 
Department of Work in Home Fields. 

For the current year, 592 books and 22 magazines have been mailed to the 
projects in the home fields and 64S books and 82 magazines have been sent to the 
households in the foreign fields, making a total of 1,240 books and 104 magazines 
provided for the use of our workers. 

The books that led in popularity in 1955 were: Columbia Viking Encyclo- 
pedia, Premier World Atlas, Interpreter's BibU. The Old Testament and the Fine 
Arts, Stories to Dramatize, and Out of My Life and Thought. 

Even- woman who contributes money through the Woman's Society of Christian 
Service is helping to make this important work possible, for Library Service is 
within appropriations. Library Service not only meets a real need, but also helps 
your workers to feel that you have a personal interest in them. They express great 
appreciation for the books and magazines. 



Status of Women 

By Mrs. W. H. Ratliff, Chairman 

THE emphasis this year was on Clergy Rights for Women. The secretaries on 
all levels did excellent work in cultivation and interpretation. More than two 
thousand memorials were sent to General Conference. That was evidence of 
the concern which had been aroused across the church. General Conference granted 
full clergy rights to women in The Methodist Church. This phase of the work in 
this committee has been completed. 

Reports from the six jurisdictions show that the work is increasing in under- 
standing and appreciation as well as in the numbers of local committees. 



208 

Supply Work 

By Mrs. C. A. Barr, Chairman 

DURING the year June 1, 1955, to May 31, 1956, needed materials and cash 
amounting to $1,279,095.79 have been directed to institutions in the home 
and foreign fields under the supervision of the Woman's Division. This is an 
increase of $55,093.92 over the previous year. Giving through Cash for Supply 
Work has increased annually during the quadrennium, 1952-1956, and of the amount 
given this year, 73 per cent was in cash. An average of 17,000 Societies reported 
doing some Supply Work each quarter and the number of districts reporting 100 per 
cent is gradually increasing. Special recognition is given to North Central Juris- 
diction with five districts reporting 100 per cent each quarter of the year. 



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Standing Committees 211 

Pensions 

By Mrs. H. E. Werner, Chairman 

THE Woman's Division of Christian Service has reason to be proud of the 
goals achieved within the Pension Funds during the past quadrennium (a) to 

bring the retirement allowance for all missionaries and deaconesses for both the 
uniting organizations and the Woman's Division up to the same amount and (b) 
to bring together into one total picture all of the seven different Pension Funds. 

Payments into the Pension Funds by the Department of Work in Home Fields 
and the Department of Work in Foreign Fields have been made to date according 
to the actuarial schedule for the realization of the first goal. 

During the year there was transferred from the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church $3,895.98 for the Retirement Fund of 
the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. Also during the year the treasurer of 
the Woman's Home Missionary Society transferred to the Woman's Division of 
Christian Service $75,000.00 for the Retirement Fund for Deaconesses and Home 
Workers. 

For the year the Woman's Division paid into the Pension Funds 3 1 /2 per cent 
income from investments on the average balance held in the total fund. 

As of May 31, 1956, the Missionary and Deaconess Pension Fund of the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service amounted to $480,868.73. 



Wesleyan Service Guild 

By Mrs. George Dismukes, Chairman 

AS WE COME TO THE END of the year and the quadrennium, the quadrennial 
J^^ goals, based on the emphasis, That the Kingdom of God May Be Realized, 
have been lifted up in the planning and carrying out of all programs. 

We rejoice in the achievements of the past year, but we are also fully aware 
of our great responsibility and opportunity to enlist every employed woman in the 
Guild, where she may take her place as an actively working Christian — an evangelist 
and a witness. 

The total number of units at the close of the year are 5,373; new units 285, 
with a net gain in members of 3,159; transferred to the Woman's Society 1,214. 
Total membership 130,887. 

As a result of study, with 26,182 members attending study classes, a greater 
knowledge of the work of the church; better understanding of all people of the 
world; and a deepened concern and realization of our responsibility for these 
people have become apparent. The giving has also increased. 

Advances in Spiritual Life and Christian Social Relations are noted. 

Recruitment of missionaries and deaconesses has been emphasized, and a 
number of Guild members have answered the challenges. 

The Wesleyan Service Guild looks forward "otith hope to the new quadrennium, 
as it relates its purpose to the theme: "The Spirit of Christ — for All of Life," an 
emphasis of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 



212 



Memorials 



Edna May Abbott 

For thirty-one years Miss Edna May Abbott did educational and evangelistic 
work in India, mainly in the rural areas of North India and Lucknow Confer- 
ences. She was born in Johnson County, Iowa, June 12, 1881, and died in Morrall, 
Ohio, on February 17, 1956. A graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University where she 
was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, she studied also at Cincinnati Training School, 
Ohio University and at Boston University. Miss Abbott retired in 1949. 

Myra Pauline Anderson 

Miss Myra Pauline Anderson was born in Anderson County, South Carolina, 
on December 7, 1894, and died December 26, 1955, in Oakland, California, after a 
lingering illness. She studied at Lander College, Anderson College, and Scarritt 
Bible and Training School. In 1922 Miss Anderson was appointed to missionary 
work in Japan. She taught English at Palmora Woman's Institute at Kobe, Hiro- 
shima Girls' School, and Fraser Institute. From 1946 until her return to America 
in 1955 Miss Anderson was on the faculty of Hiroshima Jo Gakuin. 

Agnes Ashtcill 

Miss Agnes Ashwill, who served in India and also in Burma, retired in 1926. 
Born near Delaware, Ohio, January 3, 1874, she died February 7, 1956, in Alhambra, 
California. She was a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and Columbia 
University. 

Nettie Almira Bacon 

Miss Nettie Almira Bacon went to her rest on May 6, 1956, at Fairmont, 
Minnesota. She served for thirty years in India where she taught in the Science 
Department of Isabella Thoburn College. She also served at Buxar, Rasra, and 
Cawnpore. At Cawnpore she was in charge of the Hudson Memorial Girls' School. 

Johanna M. Bauer 

Miss Johanna M. Bauer died August 4, 1955, at the Bethesda Deaconess Rest 
Home, Cincinnati, Ohio. She was ninety-three years old. Miss Bauer was one of 
the seven founders of the German Methodist Deaconess Home and Bethesda Hospital 
in Cincinnati. She entered deaconess work in 1891 at the Elizabeth Gamble Deacon- 
ess Home and Christ Hospital. She was retired in 1919. 

Laura Bell Beasly 

Mrs. Laura Bell Beasly served for five years as superintendent of nurses at 
the old Mary Wilson Sanatorium at Tilaunia, Rajputana, India. She died August 
19, 1955, in Champaign, Illinois. 

Susette Blackman 

Miss Susette Blackman, a retired deaconess, passed away at Bancroft-Taylor 
Rest Home, Ocean Grove, New Jersey, on January 21, 1956. She was consecrated a 
deaconess in the New York East Conference in 1897. Her entire career was spent 
in Brooklyn as pastor's assistant in several churches. 

Hazel A. Bulifant 

Deaconess Hazel A. Bulifant died in Baltimore, Maryland, on August 20, 1955. 
At the time of her death she was on leave for study at the University of Maryland. 



Memorials 213 

Miss Bulifant was a graduate of Scarritt Bible and Training School, and of the Army 
School of Nursing, Washington, D. C. She served in Sibley Memorial Hospital in 
Washington, D. C; at Freeman Clinic and Newark Hospital, El Paso, Texas; at 
Homer Toberman Settlement, San Pedro, California; and at St. Mark's Community 
Center, New Orleans, Louisiana. Miss Bulifant was a native of Hampton, Virginia. 

Bertha E. Deen 

Miss Bertha E. Deen was eighty-seven years old when she died July 24, 1955, 

at the Bancroft-Taylor Rest Home, Ocean Grove, New Jersey. She was a graduate 

of the New York Deaconess Training School and of the Deaconess Hospital School 

of Nursing, Boston. Most of her years of service were spent in Jersey City and in 

Jacksonville, Florida, where she was superintendent of Brewster Hospital from 

1918 to 1929. 

Mary DeGroat 

Miss Mary DeGroat, a retired deaconess, passed away December 26, 1955, at 
her home in Blooming Grove, Pennsylvania. A 1910 graduate of the former Lucy 
Webb Hayes National Training School, she served in the Wyoming and Newark 
Conferences until her retirement in 1927. 

Harriet Fink 

At the age of ninety-three Miss Harriet Fink died at the home of her sister, 

Mrs. Clara L. Dobson, Boaz, Alabama, on July 27, 1955. Miss Fink served under 

the former Woman's Home Missionary Society at Rebecca McClesky Hall in Boaz, 

Alabama. 

Gertrude Gilman 

From 1896 until 1929, when she retired, Miss Gertrude Gilman taught at 
Girls' School in Peking, China. She studied at Boston University, receiving her 
Ph. D. Degree from that institution in 1892. She was born in Springfield, Vermont 
on July 15, 1868, and passed away April 25, 1956, at her home in Pasadena, 
California. 

Helen M. Graham 

Miss Helen M. Graham, a 1914 graduate of the Lucy Webb Hayes National 
Training School, served for twenty-seven years as a church deaconess in Buffalo, 
Utica, and New York City. Retired in 1941, she passed away at the Folts Home, 
Herkimer, New York, October 14, 1955. 

Mary Bell Griffith 

Miss Mary Bell Griffith was born in Tenby, Wales, September 26, 1861. She 
had passed her ninety-fourth birthday before her death in San Diego, California, 
December 10, 1955. From 1889 to her retirement in 1925 she gave rich service as 
a missionary in Japan. She worked in Yonezawa, Tokyo, Yokohama, and Hirosaki. 

Ada Bearl Hall 

Miss Ada Bearl Hall was born in Ruggles, Ohio, January 16, 1887. She 
received her education at Ohio University. Under the Woman's Foreign Mission- 
ary Society she went to Korea in 1921 to serve as field treasurer and superintendent 
of Girls' Primary Schools in Seoul. She also served as treasurer of the Korean 
Methodist Church and its oganizations and, for a number of years, as treasurer 
and business manager of Ewha College. When she was forced to leave Korea 
in 1950 she was transferred to Fuokuoka Girls' High School in Japan where she 
served until her retirement in 1954. She died in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on 
February 22, 1956. 



214 

Mabel Corinne Hartford 

Miss Mabel Corinne Hartford blazed new trails in China in the field of education 
among women. A graduate of the Chicago Training School, she went to China in 
1887. During her forty-two years of missionary service in that country she opened 
schools in Foochow, Kutien, Yuki, and Yenping. Miss Hartford was born September 
27, 1860, in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and died in the Wentworth Home for the 
Aged in Dover, New Hampshire, on January 20, 1956. 

Ella C. Hartshorn 

Mrs. Ella C. Hartshorn was born in Kossuth County, Iowa, on May 17, 1868, 
and died at Robincroft Rest Home, Pasadena, California, on October 30, 1955. She 
was a graduate of Iowa State Teachers' College and of Lucy Webb Hayes National 
Training School, Washington, D. C. She served as superintendent of the Aldrich 
Deaconess Training School, Grand Rapids, Michigan, and also established the 
Esther Hall and Community Center in that city. 

Carlotta Elizabeth Hoffman 

For twenty-eight years Miss Carlotta Elizabeth Hoffman served as a missionary 
to India — at Phalera in Rajputana, Aligarh, and Roorkee. She died May 11, 1956, 
at Clark Memorial Home, Grand Rapids, Michigan. Miss Hoffman was born in 
Filer City, Michigan, May 28, 1878. She was a graduate of Manistee Teachers' 
Training School and also attended Folt's Bible Institute in Herkimer, New York. 

Rachel McDougall Jarrett 

Miss Rachel McDougall Jarrett died January 30, 1956, at Robincroft Home, 
Pasadena, California. She received her education at Peabody College, Scarritt 
College, and the University of Chicago. She began her service in Rio de Janeiro 
and Sao Paulo under the Missionary Council of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, and served there for thirty-six years. She was born January 18, 1882, in 
Texarkana, Texas. 

David Dallas Jones 

On January 24, 1956, Dr. David Dallas Jones, president emeritus of Bennett 
College, died in Greensboro, North Carolina, following a long illness. Born in 
Greensboro in 1887, Dr. Jones was graduated as a Phi Beta Kappa from Wesleyan 
College, Middletown, Connecticut. He also studied at the University of Chicago 
and Columbia University. Both Howard and Syracuse Universities conferred upon 
him the degree of LL.D. in 1954. 

From 1914 to 1923 Dr. Jones was executive secretary of the Pine Street YMCA 
in St. Louis, Missouri. In 1926 Dr. and Mrs. Jones were called to Bennett College. 
Under their leadership, the college was converted from a run-down, impoverished 
coeducational school to a modern, well-equipped woman's college with sound financial 
backing and a curriculum carefully designed by Dr. and Mrs. Jones to fit the inter- 
racial problems of Bennett's students. He resigned from the presidency of the 
college just a few months before he died. 

Rose Lienhard 

Miss Rose Lienhard, a deaconess-nurse in charge of Nursing Service at Scarlet 
Oaks Home, Cincinnati, Ohio, died suddenly April 20, 1956. She entered her 
deaconess probationary period at the Bethesda Hospital in Cincinnati following 
her graduation from that hospital and Dorcas Institute. Miss Lienhard served 
in Bethesda Hospital for forty-two years. 



Memorials 215 

Josephine V. Lieri 

In her seventy-ninth year Miss Josephine V. Liers entered into her rest on 
July 1, 1955, at the Good Samaritan Hospital, Waukon, Iowa. She was born 
December 29, 1875, in Elkadar, Iowa. A graduate of Upper Iowa University at 
Fayette, she went to India in 1907 as a missionary under the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society. From then until her retirement in 1940 she gave thirty-two 
years of devoted service in Central Provinces Conference in India. 

May Belle Lilly 

May Belle Lilly was born October 29, 1864, at Center Point, Iowa. In her 
early childhood her family moved to Washington. She attended Willamette Uni- 
versity, Salem, Oregon. In 1897 she went to Singapore where she was headmistress 
of the Methodist Girls' School and later a teacher at the Anglo-Chinese Girls' 
School in Penang, Malaya. She retired in 1916. Miss Lilly died at Brewster, 
Washington, February 24, 1956. 

Ethel McCaughan 

Miss Ethel McCaughan was born in Des Moines, Iowa, December 13, 1886, 
but lived most of her childhood in Durango, Mexico, where she died July 22, 1955. 
She was a graduate of Scarritt Bible and Training School and was commissioned in 
1915 and appointed to Mexico. Because of the revolution she could not go immedi- 
ately to her post so she served in the United States until 1918. In Mexico she 
served at Centra Cristiano in Monterrey and in Chihuahua. In 1926 she received 
a Bachelor of Science degree from Peabody College. After her retirement in 1938 
she made her home in Durango. 

Myra Lillian McDade 

Miss Myra Lillian McDade was born in Hagerstown, Maryland, June 3, 1877, 
and died November 13, 1955. She was a graduate of Goucher College and Boston 
University. In 1919 Miss McDade went to China, serving as a contract teacher 
until her status was changed in 1924 to that of missionary. Miss McDade served 
for twenty years in China. After her retirement she lived in Westminster, Maryland. 

Anna Neiderheiser 

Miss Anna Neiderheiser was born in Washington County, Iowa, October 6, 1868. 
At the age of seventeen she began to show the initiative and ability which character- 
ized her service. Miss Neiderheiser entered Fisk Bible and Training School, Kansas 
City, Kansas (now National College for Christian Workers), in September, 1900, 
and was graduated in June, 1902. Immediately following her graduation she served 
as secretary of the school. In November of that same year she was made superin- 
tendent of the Training School. Later the school was moved to its present location 
in Kansas City, Missouri. It was under her able leadership that Fisk Hall, Schoep- 
kopff Hall, and the Kansas Building were erected. In May, 1925, the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Pedagogy was conferred upon her by Kansas Wesleyan Uni- 
versity. She was also a member of Pi Gamma Mu, the National Social Science 
Honorary Society. After her retirement she was active in the Alumnae Association 
until shortly before her death at Robincroft Rest Home, Pasadena, California, on 
September 6, 1955, following a lingering illness. 

Anna Gail Patterson 

Miss Anna Gail Patterson was born near Shadyside, Ohio, November 25, 1884. 
She died in Marionville, Missouri, April 25, 1956. A graduate of Ohio University, 



216 

she did graduate study at the University of Chicago. Miss Patterson sailed for 
India in 1920 and served at Bidar Girls' School and at Sironcha Girls' School. 
She also did evangelistic work for one year at Hyderabad. Health prevented her 
return to India after her second term. 

Nellie E. M. Rapp 

After a long illness following a stroke, Miss Nellie E. M. Rapp died on August 
7, 1955, at Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio. Miss Rapp was a graduate of 
Dorcas Institute in 1920 and of Bethesda Hospital in 1922. From then until the 
time of her illness she served as supervisor in several departments of the hospital. 
Miss Rapp was fifty-eight years old. 

Gertrude Saathoff 

Miss Gertrude Saathoff, a graduate of National Training School (now Na- 
tional College for Christian Workers) at Kansas City, Missouri, served during 
her years as a deaconess in the Genesee Conference at a settlement house in 
Buffalo, New York; at the Kent Industrial Home, Greensboro, North Carolina; 
the West Side Community House, Cleveland, Ohio; and on the staff of Boylan- 
Haven School, Jacksonville, Florida. She was retired from this latter institution 
in 1954. Her longest term of service was at the West Side Community House 
where she served for twenty years. She died at Storm Lake, Iowa, on February 

28, 1956. „,. .. 

Winifred spaulding 

Miss Winifred Spaulding was born in Spafford, New York, on February 19, 
1865, and died in Robincroft Home in Pasadena, California, on April 9, 1956, at 
the age of ninety-one. She was a graduate of Hillsdale College in Michigan and 
Oberlin College, Ohio. Several years after leaving college she entered the Cleve- 
land Deaconess Home for training. Her years of service were rich. She served 
as superintendent of National Training School in Kansas City, Missouri (now 
National College for Christian Workers) for two years. Because of her outstand- 
ing work she was chosen to go to the Philippines in 1903. There she organized the 
Bible Training School for Filipino Girls which later became Harris Memorial 
Training School in Manila. She entered Robincroft in 1941. 

Sister Meta Stelljes 

Sister Meta Stelljes was licensed and consecrated a deaconess-nurse by the 

East German Conference. She served for fifty-two years on the staff of Bethany 

Hospital, Brooklyn, New York, where she passed away on October 13, 1955. Her 

inspiring and capable leadership and devoted service will long be remembered by 

those who knew her. 

Louise Strothmann 

Miss Louise Strothmann, a retired deaconess, died at Bethesda Hospital, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, December 5, 1955, in her eighty-seventh year. Miss Strothmann 
served for twenty-eight years as a deaconess under the Bethesda Deaconess Asso- 
ciation in Cincinnati. 

Ruth Frances Thomas 

Miss Ruth Frances Thomas began her missionary service at the Hartzell Girls' 
School in Gikuki, Portuguese East Africa, in 1918. On October 21, 1955, she died 
quietly at her post in the land she had served so long and so faithfully and was 
laid to rest in a peaceful grove in Kambini. 

Miss Thomas was born in East St. Louis, Illinois, May 19, 1892. She was 
educated at McKendree College, Greenville College, Chicago Evangelistic Institute, 
Eastern Illinois State Normal, Charleston Teachers' College, and Illinois University. 



Memorials 217 

At the time of her death she was head of the Woman's School at Kambini where 
she specialized in adult literacy, using the Laubach method. 

Ruth Ann Warrington 

After forty-one years of varied and effective service, Miss Ruth Ann Warrington 
died December 7, 1955, shortly before reaching retirement age. Miss Warrington 
was born in Hot Springs, Arkansas, November 10, 1889. She was educated in 
Northwestern State Normal School, Alva, Oklahoma. On her furloughs she studied 
at Willamette University, Salem, Oregon, receiving her degree in 1931. During 
her years of service in India she taught in the Methodist Girls' School in Moradabad; 
in Bijnor, Bareilly, Hardoi, Sitapur, and Pauri. She also did evangelistic work in 
Chandauri and Bareilly Districts, was superintendent of the Warne Baby Fold, and 
business manager of Clara Swain Hospital in Bareilly. 

Catherine E. Watterson 

Miss Catherine E. Watterson, a retired deaconess living at the Bancroft-Taylor 
Rest Home, Ocean Grove, New Jersey, passed away at Fitkin Memorial Hospital, 
Neptune, New Jersey, July 6, 1955. Miss Watterson was a graduate of the New 
York Deaconess Training School, New York City. Her years of service were spent 
within the New York East and New York Conferences as a parish visitor and chil- 
dren's worker in several churches. 

M. Lotte Whittaker 

At the age of eighty-six Miss M. Lotte Whittaker died in New Westminster, 
B. C, Canada, on February 5, 1956. She was born in Flesherton, Ontario, Canada, 
on January 1, 1870. She received her education at Collinwood Collegiate Institute 
and Jarvis Street Collegiate Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Miss Whittaker 
served in Rangoon, Burma, under the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. 

Mary Eva Gregg Wilson 

Mrs. Mary Eva Gregg Wilson (Mrs. Franklin M.) was a missionary in India 
for thirty-five years. She was educated at Iowa Wesleyan College; the Chicago 
Training School; and Chicago University. Upon arrival in India in 1899 she was 
assigned to the Muttra Training School for Women. She was the principal of 
this school for many years. After her marriage to Dr. Wilson in 1912, she did 
evangelistic work in the towns and villages of the United Provinces where her 
husband was a district superintendent. She was born October 1, 1869, on a farm 
in Iowa and died at her home in Los Angeles, California, October 5, 1955. 

Lola Wood 

Miss Lola Wood was born July 29, 1881, in Louisville, Illinois, and died July 
8, 1955. She was a missionary to Korea under the former Woman's Foreign Mis- 
sionary Society and served from 1914 to 1919 as a teacher at Ewha University, 

Seoul, Korea. 

Verr H. Zeliff 

Miss Verr H. Zeliff, a deaconess in active service, died suddenly on December 
8, 1955, at the home of her sister in Cleveland, Ohio. Appointed in 1920 under 
the former Woman's Home Missionary Society, Miss Zeliff was for many years 
superintendent of Harwood School for Spanish-speaking Girls, Albuquerque, New 
Mexico. In 1944 she went to Puerto Rico as superintendent of the George 0. 
Robinson School. At the time of her death she was superintendent of the Eva 
Comer Home, Birmingham, Alabama. 



CHARTER 

WOMAN'S DIVISION OF CHRISTIAN SERVICE 

OF THE BOARD OF MISSIONS OF THE METHODIST CHURCH 

LAWS OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK— CHAPTER 112 

AN ACT to amend chapter ninety-nine of the laws of nineteen hundred forty-two, 
entitled "An act to facilitate the unification and integration of the missionary 
organizations and societies of The Methodist Church and for that purpose to 
incorporate Woman's Division of Christian Service of the Board of Missions and 
Church Extension of The Methodist Church," in relation to changing the corporate 
name of "Woman's Division of Christian Service of the Board of Missions and 
Church Extension of The Methodist Church" to "Woman's Division of Christian 
Service of the Board of Missions of The Methodist Church," and continuing such 
corporation in all of its privileges and powers. 

Became a law March 17, 1953, with the approval of the Governor. 

Section 1. Chapter ninety-nine of the laws of nineteen hundred forty-two, entitled 
"An act to facilitate the unification and integration of the missionary organizations 
and societies of The Methodist Church and for that purpose to incorporate Woman's 
Division of Christian Service of the Board of Missions and Church Extension of The 
Methodist Church," is hereby amended to read as follows: 

§ 1. All persons associated, or who may become associated, together in a body 
corporate under the name and style of "Woman's Division of Christian Service of the 
Board of Missions and Church Extension of The Methodist Church," are hereby 
continued as a body corporate by the name of "Woman's Division of Christian Service 
of the Board of Missions of The Methodist Church." Any and all powers which said 
corporation has heretofore possessed and any and all property which said cor- 
poration may have heretofore purchased or otherwise acquired and any legacy, 
devise, grant, gift, bequest, transfer or subscription, heretofore or hereafter made or 
given to said corporation in or by any of the names by which it has been known 
previous to the passage of this act shall be vested in and owned by the said corporation 
under the name provided in this section as amended by this act. 

§2. The objects of said corporation are religious, philanthropic and educational, 
designed to diffuse more generally the blessings of Christianity and education in every 
part of the world and to promote and support Christian missions, missionary schools 
and all phases of religious activity at home and abroad; to develop and maintain 
Christian work among women and children at home and abroad; to cultivate Christian 
family life; to enlist and organize the efforts of Christian women, young people, and 
children in behalf of native and foreign groups, needy childhood, and community wel- 
fare; to assist in the promotion of a missionary spirit throughout the church; to select, 
train, and maintain Christian workers; to cooperate with the local church in its 
responsibilities, and to seek fellowship with Christian women of this and other lands 
in establishing a Christian social order around the world. 

It may conduct and carry on its work directly as well as through corporate or 
other agencies of The Methodist Church now existing or hereafter established, including 
all agencies and corporations of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the Methodist 

218 



Charter 219 

Episcopal Church, South, and the Methodist Protestant Church, which are now united 
in The Methodist Church, and through such denominational, interdenominational, or 
other agencies as it may determine. 

Said corporation shall be under the direction and control of the General Confer- 
ence of The Methodist Church. 

§ 3. The management and disposition of the affairs and property of said corporation 
shall be vested in its members who shall collectively constitute its Board of Managers. 
The Board of Managers may delegate its power and authority to an executive com- 
mittee. The number of its members, qualifications for membership, method of choosing 
members, number and qualifications of members to serve on the executive committee 
and the method of choosing such committee shall be as heretofore, or as from time 
to time hereafter, prescribed by the General Conference of The Methodist Church. 
The managers and executive committee appointed as prescribed by said General 
Conference at its last previous session shall be entitled to act as such from and after 
the time this act shall take effect, until successors, chosen as prescribed by the General 
Conference, shall assume their duties. 

§ 4. Said corporation shall have perpetual succession, may adopt a common seal 
and alter the same at pleasure, may sue and be sued, may acquire property for 
corporate purposes by grant, gift, purchase, devise or bequest, and hold or dispose of 
the same subject to such limitations as may be prescribed by law, may sell, transfer, 
lease, mortgage or otherwise dispose of such property, whether held in trust or other- 
wise, without obtaining leave of any court, may borrow money and secure the same 
by mortgage or otherwise, shall be competent to act as trustee in respect to any gift, 
devise or bequest pertaining to the objects of the corporation, may accept contributions 
to its funds subject to annuity, and may make such bylaws and rules for the manage- 
ment of its affairs as may be consistent with law and with its constitution which shall 
be adopted and may be altered from time to time by or under the authority of the 
General Conference of The Methodist Church, and shall have all the general powers 
and privileges of a corporation organized under the corporation laws of the state of 
New York. 

§ 5. Said corporation is organized exclusively for charitable, religious and educa- 
tional purposes and not for profit. None of its members, executive committee or 
officers shall have any share or interest in its assets or earnings; no shares of stock shall 
be issued and no part of its net earnings shall inure to the benefit of any private 
individual and no part of its activities shall be attempting in any way to influence 
legislation. 

§6. In the judgment of the legislature the objects of this corporation cannot be 
attained under general laws, and the provisions of this act shall be liberally construed 
with a view to effecting its objects and promoting its purposes. 

§ 7. This act shall take effect immediately. 



220 



The Constitution of the Board of Missions 

All references are to the Discipline of 1956 

Extracts Relating to the Woman's Division of Christian Service 

11 1171. Abtici^ 3. — Board of Managers. The management and disposition of the 
affairs of the board, the making and administration of appropriations, and all other 
activities shall be vested in a Board of Managers. 

HH72. The Board of Managers shall be composed as follows: 

1. Eighteen effective bishops of The Methodist Church resident in the United 
States, elected by the Council of Bishops; and in addition six bishops serving overseas, 
designated by the Council of Bishops, who shall have the status of members of the 
board in meetings which they may be able to attend, subject to such travel regulations 
as are provided in the Discipline for overseas bishops. 

2. Members elected quadrennially by the Jurisdictional Conferences as follows: 
one minister and three lay members, two of whom shall be women, from each juris- 
diction for each 600,000 members, or major fraction thereof, in the jurisdiction; provided 
that no jurisdiction, in addition to the bishops, shall have fewer than two ministers 

and six lay members, four of whom shall be women and two men. In nominating and 
electing such members, the Jurisdictional Conference shall have as a basis for choice 
the following: (a) one minister and one layman designated by each annual conference 
of the jurisdiction, on nomination of its Conference Board of Missions; (b) six addi- 
tional names nominated by the College of Bishops of the jurisdiction; (c) twice the 
necessary number of laywomen, designated by the jurisdiction Woman's Society of 
Christian Service from three members nominated by each conference Woman's Society 
of the jurisdiction. Vacancies among these members shall be filled by the bishops of 
the jurisdiction in which the vacancies occur ad interim, having regard to the various 
classifications of members. 

3. Twenty-seven lay men, at least four from each jurisdiction, elected quadrennially 
by the board on nomination of the Council of Bishops, to serve as members at large 
of the board, and to be assigned as nearly equally as possible to the Divisions of World 
Missions and of National Missions. 

4. Twelve women, two from each jurisdiction, elected quadrennially by the board 
on nomination of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, to serve as members at 

large of the board and this Division. 

5. Six youth members of the board twenty-three years of age or under at the time 
of their election, representing all jurisdictions and divided between youth and student 
groups elected quadrennially by the board on nomination of the National Conference 
of Methodist Youth, which, in consultation with the appropriate staff of the board, 
shall have considered suggestions of nominations by Conference Methodist Youth Fel- 
lowships and state or regional units of the Methodist Student Movement. Vacancies 
shall be filled by the board on nomination of the National Conference of Methodist 
Youth. 

6. The chairman of the program area of Christian Outreach of the National Meth- 
odist Youth Fellowship Commission. 

If 1173. The term of office of all members whose election is provided for in I 1172 
shall begin, and the board shall organize, at a meeting to be held within ninety days 
after the adjournment of the last meeting of the several Jurisdictional Conferences 
held after the adjournment of the General Conference. 

II 1174. The board shall elect quadrennially a president, who shall be the presid- 
ing officer, four vice-presidents (the nominees being the presidents of the three divisions 
and the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation), a recording secretary, and such 
other officers as it may need. Their duties shall be those usually performed by such 
officers. The board may also elect annually such committees as may be necessary to 
carry on its business. 

1 1175. The board shall elect quadrennially, upon nomination of the respective 
divisions, a general executive committee of thirty-eight members: nine from the 



Constitution — Board of Missions 221 

Division of World Missions, two of whom shall be women; nine from the Division of 
National Missions, two of whom shall be women; nine women from the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service; five women and five men from the Joint Section 
of Education and Cultivation; and the president of the board, who shall be chairman. 
A majority of the members shall constitute a quorum. This general executive committee 
shall exercise the powers of the board ad interim. 

II 1176. Article 4. Duties. — The duties of the board shall be : 

1. To have the general oversight of the missionary and church-extension program 
of The Methodist Church, with special reference to its development and expansion. 

2. To determine the broad lines of policy and program and, through the respective 
divisions, to carry out the program. 

3. To safeguard for each division the fullest measure of autonomy consistent with 
presenting a united front and a mutually supporting program. 

4. To foster, as between the respective divisions, united fellowship, planning, and 
action. 

5. On recommendation of the divisions, to determine fields to be occupied and 
the nature of the work to be undertaken; to secure, appropriate, and expend money 
for the support of all work under its care; to build and maintain churches, hospitals, 
homes, schools, parsonages, and other institutions of Christian service; and to enlist, 
train, and support the workers. 

6. To elect, on nomination of the divisions, the executive officers of the respective 
divisions. 

7. To receive and properly administer all properties and trust funds coming into 
the possession of the board as a board for missionary or other purposes, except as 
hereinafter provided. 

8. To assist in the organization of and in the maintenance of cooperative relations 
with the boards, committees, and other agencies of the General Conference; also with 

the jurisdictional, central, and annual conference boards, committees, and agencies; 
likewise with interdenominational and other missionary agencies in the home and for- 
eign fields. 

9. To make a report of its activities during the quadrennium to the General Con- 
ference and the Jurisdictional Conferences. 

f 1177. The board shall provide for the correlation and harmonization of the 
work of its various divisions, departments, and bureaus. It shall do any and all things 
consistent with its constitution and charter to accomplish the purpose of The Methodist 
Church in establishing missionary and church-extension work in home and foreign fields. 

H 1178. Article 5. Divisions. — 1. The board shall conduct its activities through 
three administrative divisions — namely, a Division of World Missions, a Division of 
National Missions, and a Woman's Division of Christian Service — and a Joint Section 
of Education and Cultivation. 

2. In constituting the membership of its divisions the board may elect from the 
membership of the Divisions of World Missions and National Missions, respectively, 
to the Woman's Division of Christian Service a number not to exceed the number of 
members which the Woman's Division of Christian Service has on the Division of 
World Missions and the Division of National Missions. (See !ItI 1195, 1210, 1240, Sec. 3) 

U 1179. Article 6. General and Executive Secretaries. — 1. The board shall elect 
quadrennially one or more general secretaries each for the Divisions of World Missions 
and of National Missions, two general secretaries (one man and one woman) for the 
Joint Section of Education and Cultivation, and one or more executive secretaries for 
the Woman's Division of Christian Service, with such assistants as the needs of the 
work may require. Said secretaries shall be nominated by their respective divisions, and 
shall be elected by the board. 

2. The general executive secretaries shall be subject to the direction of the board 
and of their respective divisions. On recommendation of the divisions their salaries 
shall be fixed and paid as the board may determine. They shall be employed exclusively 
in the work of the board, promoting its activities as the board may approve. 

3. One general secretary from the Division of World Missions, two general secretaries 
from the Division of National Missions, three executive secretaries from the Woman's 



222 

Division of Christian Service, and two general secretaries from the Joint Section of 
Education and Cultivation shall meet with the board, but without vote. (See H 1103.) 

D 1180. 1. The board shall elect the editors, men and women, of its periodicals and 
literature in the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation on nomination of the 
joint section. They shall be subject to the direction of the board and of the joint section 

2. The board shall also elect such other secretaries, treasurers, directors of depart- 
ments, and other officers, on nomination of the respective divisions and sections con- 
cerned, as the board may require. 

H 1181. All officers, whether elected quadrennially or annually, shall retire on 
reaching the retirement age fixed by the board's pension plan. 

H 1182. Article 7. Treasurers. — The board shall elect quadrennially one of the 
divisions' treasurers as the treasurer of the board. He shall receive and handle 
general funds of the board not belonging to any one division and shall act as the 
legal financial representative of the board in matters affecting the board as a whole. 
It may also elect one or more assistant treasurers. 

U 1183. The treasurer of the board and the treasurers of the divisions shall be 
responsible for receiving the funds of the board and the respective divisions, holding 
the same in a safe depository and disbursing them according to the regulations of 
the board or the respective divisions on proper order. The board on recom- 
mendation of the divisions, shall designate depositories for their funds. The treas- 
urers shall also be charged with the responsibility of receiving and holding all trust 
funds, endowments, and securities of the board and the respective divisions and 
properly disbursing the returns therefrom according to the regulations of the board 
and the respective divisions, and shall further be responsible, under the direction of 
finance committees, for the investing of said trust funds, endowments, and other 
permanent funds, excepting such funds as shall be available for loans to churches to be 
administered by the secretary of church extension. 

H 1202. Article 3. Foreign Field Committees and Estimates. — In a fqreign mission 
field of the board each annual or provisional annual conference shall have a Field 
Committee composed of the presiding bishop and wherever possible an equal number 
of national and missionary members. The national membership, which should wher- 
ever possible be an equal number of men and women, shall be elected by the annual 
conference. The missionary membership, which should wherever possible be an equal 
number of men and women, shall be nominated by the missionaries within the bounds 
of the conference and approved by the Division of World Missions and the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service. On authorization by the Central Conference, the annual 
or provisional conference may add the district superintendents as ex officio members 
without vote. The duties of the committee shall be: 

1. To elect its chairman and secretary; to forward its minutes promptly to the 
respective divisions of the board, and the report of its recommendations to the divi- 
sions for approval. 

2. To study and coordinate the work of the Division of World Missions and the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

3. To consult with the board through the respective divisions on all matters of 
mutual concern. 

4. To receive and transmit to the board reports from all the institutions and 
agencies of the church which receive aid from the board. 

5. To prepare estimates of funds requested from the board for aid to work in the 
annual or provisional annual conference and for aid to institutions and other projects; 
except the financial requirement for missionary support, which is the direct responsibility 
of the board. 

H 1203. In a mission field where there is a Central Conference in which there is 
an executive board or council of cooperation constituted, the estimates for the main- 
tenance and development of the work, prepared by the various Field Committees, shall 
be presented to the Division of World Missions and to the Woman's Division of 
Christian Service after approval by said executive board or council of cooperation. 
The estimates shall be presented, conference by conference, and by projects within the 



Constitution — Joint Section 223 

conference. These shall be prepared and submitted separately for the two 

divisions in such form as may be requ it 

11 1204. In a Central or Provisional Central Conference where there is no execu- 
tive board or council of cooperation, the estimates shall be sent directly to the 
Division of World Missions and to the Woman's Division of Christian Service 
from the Field Committee of each annual conference and provisional annual conference. 

H 1205. Wherever desired by an affiliated autonomous Methodist church and the 
missionaries working in relation to such church, there shall be a joint council composed 
of members of the affiliated autonomous church and missionaries of the board working 
in that field, under a constitution approved by the Board of Missions. This joint 
council shall be the agency through which the board shall cooperate with such affiliated 
autonomous church. 

Extracts Relating to the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation 

% 1268. The Joint Section of Education and Cultivation shall undergird with edu- 
cation and cultivation the total program of the Board of Missions. It shall be composed 
of six bishops, one from each jurisdiction: six men and two women from the Division of 
World Missions, elected by that division: six men and two women from the Division 
of National Missions, elected by that division; eight women from the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service, one of whom shall be the president of the division, elected by 
that division. In all these selections there must be due regard to equitable repre- 
sentation from the jurisdictions. 

r 1269. The joint section shall elect quadrennially a president, one or more vice- 
-lients. and a recording secretary. It shall also nominate for election by the board 
two general secretaries (one man and one woman), and other secretaries, directors, a 
treasurer, who shall be the director of one of its departments, and such other officers 
as it may determine. The treasurer of the Woman's Division of Christian Service shall 
be the treasurer of the Woman's Section. Vacancies shall be filled by the same procedure. 
The joint section shall determine the powers and duties of its officers and staff and shall 
recommend the remuneration of its employed officers and workers. 

H 1270. There shall be an annual meeting of the joint section, and it may meet at 
such other times as the chairman may designate. 

11271. The joint section shall edit, publish, sell, and circulate books, literature, and 
periodicals for the work of the board and shall be responsible for editing and preparing 
the same. It shall cooperate with the Board of Education and all agencies of The 
Methodist Church and with interdenominational agencies in the preparation and dis- 
tribution of missionary literature. 

r 1272. The ;oin: section shall promote missionary councils, conventions, institutes. 
an Annual Week of Prayer, and other meetings throughout the church for the purpose 
of developing a missionary spirit, spreading missionary information, and acquainting 
the church with the plans and policies of the board. It shall seek the cooperation of 
jurisdictional and annual conferences, district superintendents, pastors, missionary so- 
cieties, and other agencies of the church. 

1 1273. The joint section shall have charge of all plans for cultivating missionary- 
giving, and for promoting the missionary program of the church; provided, however, 
that all such plans shall be subject to and in harmony with the general financial system 
of The Methodist Church as adopted bj- the General Conference. 

r 1274. The joint section shall cooperate with the Interboard Committee on Mis- 
sionary Education. 

r 1275. The joint section shall also cooperate with schools of theology and de- 
partments of missions in the conduct of missionary institutes in such institutions, and 
shall develop other plans for affording missionary information and inspiration to 
students. 

r 1276. 2. The i • and editors of the woman's section of the joint section 

shall carry out the plans and policies of the Woman's Division of Christian Service for 
the various age groups, including the promotion of organizations for women in local 



224 

churches, districts, conferences, and jurisdictions; in providing missionary education for 
children, youth, students, and women; in creating, editing, and publishing such periodi- 
cals, books, and leaflets as the work may necessitate. This section shall give guidance in 
those local church activities that will strengthen the total life and work of the local 
church and shall cooperate in all plans necessary for the efficiency of the Woman's 
Societies of Christian Service in the jurisdictions, conferences, districts, and local 
churches. 

U 1277. The funds for the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation shall be ap- 
propriated by the board. 

Extracts Relating to Cooperation With Other Boards and Agencies 

A. Joint Committee on Christian Education in Foreign Fields 

11 1283. For the purpose of more effectively promoting Christian education out- 
side the United States there shall be a Joint Committee on Christian Education in 
Foreign Fields, composed of twenty-eight members. Fourteen shall be from the 
Board of Education as follows: four members of the board; the general secretary 
and seven additional staff members elected by the Division of the Local Church; and 
the general secretary and one additional staff member elected by the Editorial 
Division. Fourteen shall be from the Board of Missions as follows: four members of 
the board, two elected by the Division of World Missions, and two by the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service; five secretaries elected by the Division of World Missions; 
and five secretaries of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

11 1284. There may be an executive secretary of the committee who shall be 
secretary of the Board of Missions for Christian education in countries outside the 
United States. The secretary shall be elected by the Board of Missions upon nomination 
of the Joint Committee. 

U 1285. 1. The committee shall meet annually, and at such other times it shall 
determine, and shall report its actions to the Boards of Education and of Missions at 
their annual meetings. 

2. It shall have a budget for its work provided by the two boards. The major 
responsibility for the budget rests upon the Board of Missions, supplemented by support 
from the Board of Education, in which the Methodist Youth Fund shall have a part. 

B. Interboard Committee on Missionary Education 

1 1286. For the purpose of promoting effective cooperation between the Board 
of Missions and the Board of Education in missionary education there shall be an 
Interboard Committee on Missionary Education composed of the general secretaries 
of the three divisions of the Board of Education ; and five other persons to be appointed 
by that board; and an equal number from the Board of Missions, which shall consist of 
two secretaries each from the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation and the 
administrative divisions. The committee shall provide for age-group subcommittees and 
such other subcommittees as may be needed. This committee and its subcommittees 
shall be advisory and creative in character. The promotion of plans and materials 
created by this committee shall be a responsibility of the Board of Education and of the 
Board of Missions. 

H 1287. The duties of this committee shall be : (a) To develop a unified program 
of missionary education for all age groups in the local church and in the colleges, 
universities, and theological seminaries; (b) to cooperate with the Curriculum Com- 
mittee of the Board of Education in providing missionary information for church- 
school literature and in the planning and preparation of curricular materials on missions ; 

(c) to cooperate in the publication of books for missionary education in the church; 

(d) to develop cooperative plans for the missionary education and missionary giving 
of children, youth, and adults; and (e) to report annually to the Board of Missions 
and to the Board of Education. The committee shall meet annually, and at such 
other times as it may determine. 

H 1288. There shall be an executive secretary of the committee, who shall be 
elected quadrennially by the Board of Education, on nomination of committee, and 



Constitution — Woman's Division 225 

shall be confirmed by the Board of Missions. He shall be the secretary for missionary 
education of the Board of Education with staff relationship to the Division of the Local 
Church. He shall likewise be the secretary for missionary education of the Board of 
Missions having staff relationship to the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation. 
The committee shall have a budget provided for its work by the two boards upon such 
ratio as they may decide. In missionary education the executive secretary' and the mem- 
bers of the staff shall be the representatives equally of the Board of Missions and of the 
Board of Education. During the period between the General Conference and the organ- 
ization of the new committee for the coming quadrennium, the staff and those members 
who have served on the committee during the past quadrennium shall continue to func- 
tion until the new committee is organized. 

C. Interboard Committee on Ministry to Neglected Areas 

11 1289. There shall be an Interboard Committee on Ministry to Neglected Areas, 
composed of five members from the Division of National Missions of the Board of Mis- 
sions and three members each from the Division of the Local Church of the Board of 
Education, the Board of Lay Activities, the Woman's Division of Christian Service of 
the Board of Missions, and the Board of Evangelism elected by their respective divi- 
sions and boards, and five members from the church at large elected by the Council of 
Bishops. The committee may co-opt appropriate staff members of the above-named 
agencies. This committee is authorized and directed: 

1. To stud}* neglected metropolitan and rural areas. 

2. To develop and promote plans to (a) organize new churches and schools, (b) 
organize and seek support for mission churches and missions, (c) revive and support 
dying and abandoned churches, and (d) arrange by mutual agreement for ministering 
to and serving these churches, missions, and church schools. 

3. To devise methods and procedures for enlisting local churches and lay men and 
women in support of the foregoing activities with their means and services. 

4. To take other steps which the committee may deem appropriate to provide for 
ministry to such neglected areas and peoples. 



The Constitution of the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service 

¥1240. Article 1. Organisation. — 1. Within the board there shall be a Woman's 
Division of Christian Service, hereinafter called the Division, which shall be one of 
the coordinate administrative divisions of the board. 

2. The Division shall be incorporated as hereinbefore provided. 

3. The Division shall be composed of board members as follows: all the women 
members of the board (TT 1172, Sees. 2, 4), one bishop from each jurisdiction, one half 
the bishops from overseas, and one third of the youth. Additional members may be 
elected by the board from the Divisions of World Missions and of National Missions as 
provided in If 1178, Sec. 2. The Division shall hold a regular annual meeting and such 
other meetings as shall be called by the Division or the Executive Committee. 

4. The Division shall include in its scope the interests and activities formerly pro- 
moted and administered by the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, the Woman's 
Home Missionary Society, the Wesleyan Service Guild, the Ladies' Aid Societies of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church; the types of work and interests included in the Board 
of Missions, Section of Woman's Work, the Woman's Missionary Council, and former 
boards and societies (the Woman's Missionary Society, the Woman's Board of Foreign 
Missions, and the Woman's Board of Home Missions) of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South; such activities of the Woman's Convention of the Methodist Protestant 
Church as logically fall within the organization ; and all deaconess work of the uniting 
churches within the United States. All other organizations of women of similar purpose 
operating in the charges of the uniting churches may come under the scope of this 
Division. 

II 1241. Article 2. Authority. — The Division shall have authority to make bylaws 
in harmony with the charter and constitution of the board and of its divisions; to 



226 

regulate its own proceedings in harmony with its bylaws; to elect such officers 
as are to be elected by the Division, to remove any of them for cause, and to fill 
vacancies among the officers so elected ; to nominate such officers as are to be elected by 
the board, to recommend their removal for cause, and to present nominations to the 

board to fill vacancies; to recommend fields of labor; to train and present to the 
board for appointment in its various fields of service missionaries and deaconesses 
who have been approved by the Joint Committee on Missionary Personnel and to 
maintain workers; to buy and sell property; to secure and administer funds for the 
support of all work under its charge; to solicit and accept contributions subject to 
annuity under the board's regulations; to recommend to the board appropriations for 
its work; to organize jurisdiction, conference, district, and local church Societies for 
adults, youth, and children, as auxiliary to the Division; and to recommend constitu- 
tions and bylaws for the same. 

11 1242. Article 3. Purpose. — The purpose of the Division shall be to develop 
and maintain Christian work among women and children at home and abroad; to 
cultivate Christian family life; to enlist and organize the efforts of Christian women, 
youth, and children in behalf of native and foreign groups, needy childhood, and 
community welfare; to assist in the promotion of a missionary spirit throughout the 
church; to select, train, and maintain Christian workers; to cooperate with the local 
church in its responsibilities; and to seek fellowship with Christian women of this 
and other lands in establishing a Christian social order around the world. 

11 1243. Article 4. Officers. — The Division shall elect quadrennially a president, one 
or more vice-presidents, a treasurer or treasurers, and a recording secretary. Vacancies 
occurring during the quadrennium shall be filled by the Division. The Division shall 
also nominate for election by the board one or more executive secretaries and such 

other secretaries and staff as the need may require. Such other officers as the Division 
may need it shall elect. The Division shall determine the powers and duties of its 
officers and staff and shall recommend their remuneration. 

H 1249. Committees. — 1. The Division shall be empowered to create such com- 
mittees as the work may demand. There shall be an Executive Committee, a Section 
of Education and Cultivation, a Committee on Missionary Personnel, a Committee 
on Permanent Funds and Investments, a Committee on Finance and Estimates. 

There shall also be a standing Committee on the World Federation of Methodist 
Women. 

2. The cultivation and promotion of the work of the Division and its auxiliary 
organizations shall be under the direction of the Division; the plans and policies for the 
same shall be carried out by the woman secretary or secretaries of the Joint Section of 
Education and Cultivation. 

3. The Division, working through the Interboard Committee on Missionary Educa- 
tion, is authorized to cooperate in the missionary education of young women, girls, 
and children in accordance with plans to be determined by the Board of Missions and 
the Board of Education. 

H 1250. Funds. — The funds for the maintenance of the work of the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service shall be derived from annual pledges or dues, special 
memberships, devises, bequests, annuities, special offerings, gifts, and monies raised 
by special projects or collected in meetings held in the interest of the work of the 
Division; provided that the funds thus raised shall be appropriated to the work es- 
tablished by the several uniting organizations composing the Woman's Division, or 
work hereafter to be entered upon by the Woman's Division. All funds, except those 
designated for local purposes, shall be forwarded through the regular channels of the 
Woman's Societies of Christian Service to the treasurer of the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service. All undesignated funds shall be allocated by the Division on 
recommendation of its Committee on Finance and Estimates on a definite percentage 
basis to the work of the several departments of the Division. 

Constitution of the Departments of the Woman's Division 

H 1244. 1. The Division shall be organized into three departments: 

(a) Department of Work in Foreign Fields. 

(b) Department of Work in Home Fields. 

(c) Department of Christian Social Relations. 



Constitution — Departments 22^ 

2. There shall be such committees and other organizational units as shall best 
promote its interests. The functions of these, other than hereinafter determined, shall 
be denned by the Division. 

3. The Division shall elect a chairman for the respective departments, who shall 
be vice-presidents of the Division. 

4. There shall be an executive secretary or secretaries in each department. The 

number and duties of such secretaries shall be determined and defined by the Division. 

1 1245. The Department of Work in Foreign Fields shall administer and promote 

the work of missions outside the United States of America, and the Dominican Republic. 

1. There shall be a standing committee composed of the chairman, the executive 

secretaries, and the associate and/or assistant secretaries of the department; the juris- 
diction secretaries of Missionary Service in Foreign Fields, and such members of the 
Division as may be appointed by the department. 

2. There shall be an Interdivision Committee on Foreign Work. (See Par. 1199, 
Sec. 2.) 

H 1246. The legislation included under VII 1202-7 applies also to the work 

of the Woman's Division of Christian Service: (a) Foreign Field Committees and 
Estimates (Ufl 1202-5) ; (b) administration of a Mission (II 1206) ; (c) missionaries of 
The Methodist Church serving other churches (fl 1207). 

V 1247. The Department of Work in Home Fields shall administer and promote 

the work of missions within the United States of America, and the Dominican Republic. 

1. There shall be a standing committee, composed of the chairman, the executive 
secretaries and the associate and/or assistant secretaries of the department, the juris- 
diction secretaries of Missionary Service in Home Fields, and such members of the 
Division as may be appointed by the department. 

2. There shall be an Interdivision Committee on Work in Home Fields. (See 
1 1239.) 

3. There shall be a consultive interboard staff committee with the Board of Hos- 
pitals and Homes. (H 1567) 

4. There shall be a Committee on Cooperation and Counsel with the Board of 
Education. (111360) 

5. In the Department of Work in Home Fields there shall be a Commission on Dea- 
coness Work. (See 11 1252.) 

II 1248. The Department of Christian Social Relations shall promote the work of 
the Division along the lines of community service and social relations: 

1. It shall seek to make real and effective the teachings of Jesus as applied to 
individual, group, racial, and world relationships. It shall endeavor to enlist the 
participation of church women in such questions as have a moral or religious sig- 
nificance or an important bearing on public welfare. 

2. It shall seek to cooperate with other agencies of the church having similar 
purpose, endeavoring to develop Christian fellowship and to deepen concern for the 
total responsibility of the church. 

3. There shall be a standing committee, composed of the secretaries and the chair- 
man of the department, the chairmen of the committees, the jurisdiction secretaries of 
Christian Social Relations, and such other persons as the Division may provide on 
recommendation of the department. 



Constitution of the Assembly 

1 1261. There shall be a delegated body termed the Assembly which shall meet 

at such time and place as the Division may determine. The purpose of the Assembly 
shall be to promote and deepen interest in the work of the Woman's Division. The 

Division shall determine the composition, functions, and power of the Assembly. 



228 



Constitution of the Commission on Deaconess Work 

H 1252. 1. The office of deaconess is hereby authorized in The Methodist Church . . . 
This office entitles a woman to serve The Methodist Church through any of its agencies 
in any capaoity not requiring full clergy rights. 

(a) All deaconess work in the United States and its dependencies shall be under 
the supervision of the Commission on Deacouess Work of the Woman's Division of 
Christian Service. 

(b) All deaconess work outside the United States and its dependencies shall be 
under the supervision of the Central Conferences or Provisional Central Conferences 
concerned, or the annual conferences where there is not a Central Conference. 

(c) There shall be an executive secretary who shall be nominated by the commis- 
sion in consultation with the Woman's Division of Christian Service and elected by 
the Board of Missions. 

2. All properties, trust funds, permanent funds, other special funds, and endow- 
ments now held ana administered by or for the several forms of administration of 
deaconess work under the three uniting churches shall be carefully safeguarded and 
administered by the several forms of administration in the interest of those persons 
and causes for which said funds were established. 

3. The commission shall be composed of one bishop chosen by the Council of 
Bishops; four persons from each jurisdiction chosen by the jurisdiction Deaconess 
Association, two of whom shall be deaconess members of the association, one a minister 
of the jurisdiction, and one the president of the jurisdiction Woman's Society of Chris- 
tian Service; three representatives of the Woman's Division of Christian Service chosen 
by the Division; one representative of the Board of Pensions; one representative of 
the Board of Hospitals and Homes; one representative of the Board of Education; 
the secretary of the Interboard Committee on Christian Vocations; and one staff repre- 
sentative of the Joint Committee on Missionary Personnel. The executive secretary of 
the Commission on Deaconess Work shall be a member without vote. (See 1f 1103) 

4. The duties of the commission shall be: 

(a) To recommend to the Joint Committee on Missionary Personnel standards 
and procedures for enlisting and training young women for deaconess work in The 
Methodist Churoh. 

(b) To establish minimum salary standards for deaconesses. 

(c) To receive and act upon recommendations from conference Deaconess Boards, 
jurisdiction Deaconess Associations, and other agenies. 

(d) Other duties in harmony with the constitution as may be set forth in the bylaws 
of the commission. 

5. The commission shall meet annually. Its officers shall be elected quadrennially. 

6. There shall be an executive committee. Such other committees may be con- 
stituted as are necessary for carrying out the duties of the commission. 

7. A deaconess shall receive her appointment through the regular channels of the 
Commission on Deaconess Work and the conference Deaconess Board. 

8. A sabbatical leave for a definite period of time, not exceeding a year, to be 
spent in special study, may be granted with full or part salary upon recommendation 
of the executive secretary of the Commission on Deaconess Work and the conference 
Deaooness Board. Pension credit shall be granted for such sabbatical leave. All agencies 
employing deaconesses shall be encouraged to make an annual payment into the com- 
mission fund for sabbatical leave. 

9. (a) There shall be a contributory pension plan for all deaconesses commissioned 
on or after July 24, 1940. 

(b) For deaconesses commissioned or consecrated previous to July 1940, former 
agreements are continued, and the administrations with which they were connected 
are responsible for the pensions. 

(o) A deaconess employed by an agency having its own pension plan shall partici- 
pate in that plan during her term of service with that agency. 

10. A deaconess may be granted a leave of absence, not to exceed three years, for 
health reasons, study, or necessary home duties, with the privilege of continuing her 
participation in the pension plan. If an extension of leave is granted by the Commis- 
sion on Deaconess Work, participation in the pension plan for the additional years 
on leave shall not be permitted. A deaconess on leave of absence shall be a member 



Constitution — Jurisdiction Woman's Society 229 

of the quarterly conference (II 138) and the conference Deaconess Board where she 
places her church membership while on leave. 

11. A deaconess shall surrender her credentials when she is no longer available for 
an appointment in The Methodist Church. 

12. A person may be reinstated as a deaconess on recommendation of the conference 
Deaconess Board and the Commission on Deaconess Work and approval by the Joint 
Committee on Missionary Personnel. 

Constitution of the 
Jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service 

II 1255. Article 1. Name. — There shall be in each jurisdiction a jurisdiction Wom- 
an's Society of Christian Service, auxiliary to the Woman's Division of Christian Service 
of the Board of Missions. This shall include the Wesleyan Service Guild for employed 
women. 

Article 2. Function or Authority. — Each jurisdiction Woman's Society shall have 
authority to promote its work in accordance with the program and policy of the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service of the Board of Missions. It shall also recommend to the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service such plans and policies as will make the work 
within the jurisdiction more effective. 

Article 3. Membership. — The jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service 
shall be composed of its officers and six delegates from each conference Woman's 
Society within the jurisdiction, three of whom shall be conference officers; all the 
women members of the Jurisdictional Board of Missions, and any members of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service living within the jurisdiction; a representative 
of the jurisdiction Deaconess Association; all the bishops of the jurisdiction; and such 
other persons as the Society may determine. 

Article 4. Officers. — Each jurisdiction Woman's Society shall elect a president, 
one or more vice-presidents, a recording secretary, a treasurer, a secretary of Missionary 
Service in Foreign Fields, a secretary of Missionary Service in Home Fields, a secretary 
of Christian Social Relations, a secretary of Promotion, a secretary of Missionary Edu- 
cation, a secretary of Wesleyan Service Guild, a secretary of Student Work, a secretary 
of Youth Work, a secretary of Children's Work, a secretary of Literature and Publica- 
tions, a secretary of Supply Work, a secretary of Spiritual Life, a secretary of Status of 
Women, and a secretary of Missionary Personnel. Other officers and secretaries may 
be elected and such committees appointed as the work may demand in accordance with 
the plans of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Article 5. Elections. — Officers shall be elected at the first meeting of the juris- 
diction Woman's Society following the meeting of the Jurisdictional Conference, for a 
term of four years, with the privilege of re-election for one additional term in the 
same office. This term of office applies to all officers. For an officer elected during a 
quadrennium, the period to be served shall be considered the first term, thus giving 
the privilege of re-election for one additional term in the same office. 

Article 6. Meetings. — Each jurisdiction Woman's Society shall meet annually at 
such time and place as it may determine. A majority shall constitute a quorum. 

Article 7. Amendments. — Proposed amendments to this constitution shall be sent 
to the recording secretary of the Woman's Division of Christian Service at least forty 
days before the last annual meeting of the Division in the quadrennium. 

Constitution of the Jurisdiction Deaconess Association 

U 1253. 1. In each jurisdiction there shall be a jurisdiction Deaconess Association. 

2. (ft) All active deaconesses working within the bounds of the jurisdiction shall 
be members of the association. 

(b) All deaconesses in the retired relation shall be honorary members of the 
association. 



230 

(c) Other members shall be the president of the jurisdiction Woman's Society of 
Christian Service, the jurisdiction secretary of Missionary Service in Home Fields, and 
the president of each conference Woman's Society of Christian Service within the 
jurisdiction. 

3. There shall be a meeting of the association held annually or biennially in con- 
nection with the jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

4. The association shall elect its officers. 

5. There shall be an executive committee in the association. 

6. The duties of the association shall be: 

(a) To promote deaconess work as authorized by the Commission on Deaconess 
Work. 

(b) To arrange workers' conferemces. 

(c) To provide opportunities for fellowship among the workers in the jurisdiction. 

(d) Other duties in harmony with the constitution as may be set forth in bylaws. 

Constitution of the Conference Woman's 
Society of Christian Service 

K 1256. Article 1. Name. — In each annual conference there shall be organized a 

conference Woman's Society of Christian Service auxiliary to the jurisdiction Wom- 
an's Society and to the Woman's Division of Christian Service of the Board of Missions. 
This shall include the Wesleyan Service Guild for employed women. 

Article 2. Purpose. — The purpose of the conference Woman's Society of Christian 
Service shall be to plan and direct the work of the Society within the conference in 
accordance with the constitution and bylaws of the Woman's Division of Christian 
Service. 

Article 3. Membership and Officers. — The conference Woman's Society shall be 
composed of representatives from Societies in the local church, the number to be 
determined by each conference according to its requirements; such district officers 
as the conference Society may determine, from each district; all chairmen of confer- 
ence standing committees; officers or members of the Woman's Division or of the 
jurisdiction Woman's Society residing within the bounds of the conference; and the 
following conference officers: a president, a vice-president, a recording secretary, 
a treasurer, a secretary of Promotion, a secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild, a 
secretary of Student Work, a secretary of Youth Work, a secretary of Children's Work, 
a secretary of Missionary Education, a secretary of Christian Social Relations, a sec- 
retary of Literature and Publications, a secretary of Supply Work, a secretary of 
Spiritual Life, a secretary of Status of Women, a secretary of Missionary Personnel, 
and such other secretaries of lines of work as may be required. 

Article 4. Annual Conference Relationships. — The president of the conference 
Woman's Society shall be seated in the annual conference, but without the right to vote 
unless she is otherwise a member of the conference. 

Article 5. Meetings. — There shall be an annual meeting of the conference Woman's 
Society when reports shall be received from the conference officers and from the districts. 
Officers shall be elected, the necessary business transacted, and pledges made for the 
year. There shall be a program of inspiration and information in harmony with the 

plans and projects of the jurisdiction Woman's Society and the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service. 

Article 6. Elections. — At the last annual meeting of the quadrennium the con- 
ference Woman's Society shall : (a) elect, according to the instructions in K 1255, 3, 
six women from the conference, three of whom shall be conference officers, for mem- 
bership in the jurisdiction Woman's Society; and (b) nominate three women for mem- 
bership on the General Board of Missions, the names to be sent to the jurisdiction Wom- 
an's Society, according to the instructions in 11 1172, 2 c. At the annual meeting of 
the conference Woman's Society preceding the Assembly (J 1251), delegates to the 
Assembly shall be elected in accordance with the stated membership. 



Constitution — District Woman's Society 231 

Article 7. Amendments. — Proposed amendments to this constitution shall be sent 
to the recording secretary of the Woman's Division of Christian Service at least forty 
days before the last annual meeting of the Division in the quadrennium. 

Constitution of Annual Conference Deaconess Board 

11 1254. 1. In each annual conference there shall be a Conference Deaconess Board. 

2. The purpose of the board shall be to create and maintain interest in deaconess 
work, to establish and interpret deaconess relationships to the annual conference, and 
to cooperate with the Commission on Deaconess Work in forming policies and making 
recommendations regarding deaconess work. 

3. The board shall be composed of all active deaconesses serving within the bounds 
of the conference; the members of the Cabinet; pastors of local churches employing 
deaconesses; four representatives of the conference Woman's Society of Christian 
Service; one representative from the Commission on Christian Vocations; and one 
representative, not a deaconess, from the local board of managers or committee of 
each project within the conference where deaconesses live or are employed. Retired 
deaconesses living within the bounds of the conference shall be honorary members, 
having the privilege of the floor without vote. 

4. The duties of the board shall be: 

(a) To review, evaluate, and report annually to the Commission on Deaconess 
Work the standing of all deaconesses within the conference. 

(b) To study credentials received from quarterly conferences (11 146, 2) and recom- 
mend to the Joint Committee on Missionary Personnel possible candidates for the 
office of deaconess. 

(c) To cooperate with the Commission on Deaconess Work in the annual appoint- 
ments of deaconesses. It shall submit the list of appointments to be read by the bishop 
presiding at the annual conference, and to be printed in the journal. 

(d) To arrange for the licensing and the consecration service of those deaconesses 
assigned to the conference for these purposes. 

(e) In cooperation with the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service and 
other agencies of the church, to initiate and develop plans for the promotion of dea- 
coness work, including an annual program on deaconess work. 

(f) To consider complaints and charges against deaconesses; to act as a trial court 
in case of trial; and to make recommendations to the Commission on Deaconess Work. 

5. The board shall meet annually and elect its officers. 

6. There shall be an executive committee and other committees as are necessary 
for carrying out the duties of the board. 

7. The board shall report annually to the annual conference, the jurisdiction 
Deaconess Association, and the Commission on Deaconess Work. Its report shall be 
printed in the journal of the annual conference. 



Constitution of the District Woman's Society of 
Christian Service 

11 1257. Article 1. Name. — There may be a district Woman's Society of Christian 
Service auxiliary to the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service. This shall 
include the Wesleyan Service Guild for employed women. 

Article 2. Purpose. — The purpose of the district Society shall be to unite all the So- 
cieties within the district in an earnest effort for the promotion of the work of the 
conference Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

Article 3. Membership. — All members of Woman's Societies of Christian Service 
in the local churches of a district shall be considered members of the district Society. 

Article 4. District Officers. — The officers of the district Society shall be a presi- 
dent, a secretary of Promotion, a recording secretary, and such other officers as will 
bert develop and promote the interests of the Woman's Society of Christian Service 



232 

of the district. The district president, the secretary of Promotion, and such other district 
officers as the conference Society may determine shall be members of the conference 
executive committee. 1 

Article 5. Meetings. — There shall be an annual meeting of the district Society, 
when reports shall be received from the Societies in the district, officers elected, necessary 
business transacted, pledges made by the Societies, and a program of inspiration and in- 
formation given along the lines of work of the Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

Article 6. Amendments. — Proposed amendments to this constitution shall be Bent 
to the recording secretary of the Woman's Division of Christian Service at least forty 

days before the last annual meeting of the Division in the quadrennium. 

Constitution of the Woman's Society of Christian 
Service in the Local Church 

H 281. In every local church there shall be a Woman's Society of Christian Service. 
The following is the authorized constitution for such a Society: 

II 282. Article 1. Name. — There shall be a Woman's Society of Christian Service in 
the local church, auxiliary to the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service. A 
Wesleyan Service Guild, auxiliary to the Woman's Society of Christian Service, com- 
posed of employed women, may also be organized in the local church. 

Article 2. Purpose. — The purpose of the Woman's Society of Christian Service 
shall be to unite all the women of the church in Christian living and service; to help 
develop and support Christian work among women and children around the world ; 
to develop the spiritual life; to study the needs of the world; to take part in 6uch 
service activities as will strengthen the local church, improve civic, community, and 
world conditions. To this end this organization shall seek to enlist women, young people, 
and children in this Christian fellowship, and to secure funds for the activities in the 
local church and the support of the work undertaken at home and abroad for the 
establishment of a world Christian community. 

Article 3. Membership. — A woman may become a member of this Society by 
giving prayer, service, and an annual contribution of money to the total budget through 
membership offerings, or dues, pledges, or gifts. She shall contribute to, educate for, and 
promote the total program of the women of Methodism. 

Article 4. Funds. — All funds from whatsoever source secured by this Society 
belong to this organization and shall be disbursed only in accordance with its con- 
stitution and by its order. 

*2. The total budget to be secured and administered by a Woman's Seciety of 
Christian Service in the local church shall include pledges to missions to be directed 
through regular channels of finance of the Society, and also funds for local church and 
community activities. 

3. All undesignated funds channeled to the Woman's Division shall be divided 
in the office of the treasurer of the Woman's Division on a basis to be determined 
by the Division. There shall be no division of funds by the local Society. 

4. Funds for local church and community activities shall be secured and admin- 
istered by the Woman's Society of Christian Service in the local church. 

5. Each Society in the local church shall make an annual pledge to the total 
budget adopted by the conference Society. 

6. Each Society in the local church shall include in its budget a definite amount 
for a cultivation fund. 

Article 5. Officers and Elections. — The officers of the Society shall be a presi- 
dent, one or more vice-presidents, a recording secretary, a treasurer, and secretaries of 

Promotion, of Missionary Education and Service, of Christian Social Relations, of 
Student Work, of Youth Work, of Children's Work, of Spiritual Life, of Literature 
and Publications, of Supply Work, of the Status of Women, a chairman of Local Church 
Activities, and such other officers in charge of lines of work as may be required. These 
officers shall be elected at the annual meeting of the Society. The pastor shall be a mem- 

1 At the Sixteenth Annual Meeting, the Woman's Division of Christian Service adopted a change in 
policy affecting the membership of the conference executive committee. According to this recommendation 
the president is the only district officer with vote on that committee. 



Bylaws — Woman's Division 233 

ber of the executive committee, ex officio. Where a simpler form of organization is neces- 
sary in a small church, there shall be five officers or more, as determined by the local 
Society. These officers shall share the responsibility for promoting the work of the 
full quota of officers as listed in this paragraph. 

Article 6. Meetings. — The Society shall hold one or more meetings during a month 
for the transaction of its business and for the study of the work. 

Article 7. Amendments. — Proposed amendments to this constitution may be sent 
to the recording secretary of the Woman's Division of Christian Service at least forty 
days before the last annual meeting of the Division in the quadrennium. Proposed 
amendments may also be sent directly to the General Conference. 



* See bylaws of the Wesleyan Service Guild Unit in the Local Church, Art. VII, Section 2, second 
paragraph, which reads: "The pledge of the Wesleyan Service Guild for missions shall be determined 
by the Guild and added to the pledge of the local Woman's Society of Christian Service but designated 
as Guild funds." 



Bylaws of the Woman's Division of Christian Service 
of the Board of Missions of The Methodist Church 

Article I. — Meetings of the Division 

Section 1. The annual meeting of the Division shall be held on a date to be 
designated by the Division or by the Executive Committee of the Division and in 
connection with the annual meeting of the Board of Missions. 

The program of the annual meeting shall be prepared by the president, the vice- 
president, and the recording secretary in consultation with the chairmen of the three 
departments and the chairman of the Section of Education and Cultivation. 

Section 2. Special meetings of the Division may be called by the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Division or by the president in consultation with the administrative 
committee of the Executive Committee on ten days' notice. 

Section 3. The following order of business is suggested for the annual meeting: 

1. Devotional service 

2. Calling of the roll 

3. Appointment or election of special committees 

4. Election of annual meeting committees for the board 

5. Report of the president 

6. Report of the vice-president 

7. Report of the treasurer 

8. Report of the chairmen and executive secretaries of departments 

9. Report of the chairman and secretaries of the Section of Education and 

Cultivation 
10. Report of standing committees: 
Executive Committee 
Committee on Spiritual Life 
Committee on Literature and Publications 
Committee on Finance and Estimates 
Committee on Permanent Funds and Investments 
Committee on Missionary Personnel 
Committee on Library Service 
Committee on Status of Women 
Committee on Supply Work 
Committee on Constitution and Bylaws 
Committee on Nominations 

Committee on the World Federation of Methodist Women 
Committee on Policy 
Committee on Pensions 
Committee on Salaries 
Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild 



234 

11. Report of special committees 

12. Unfinished business 

13. New business 

14. Approval of minutes 

15. Adjournment 

Section 4- The Quadrennial Organizational Meeting, using the order of business 
suggested in Section 3, shall include the nomination of officers, members-at-large of 
the board, executive committee members, and other committee members of the board, 
to be elected by the board; the election of other officers of the Division; the organiza- 
tion of the departments; the organization of the Section of Education and Cultivation; 
and the election and organization of standing committees. 

Section 5. The majority of the members of the Division or of any group of the 
Division shall constitute a quorum for the group concerned. 

Section 6. The staff of the Division shall have the privileges of the floor for discus- 
sion. 

Article II. — Officers and Their Duties 

Section 1. There shall be the following four general officers of the Division: a 
president, a vice-president, a recording secretary, and a treasurer. 

Section 2. There shall be a president of the Division who will be nominated by 
the Division to the board as one of the vice-presidents of the board. The president of 
the Division shall be the president of the Assembly. 

She shall preside at all meetings of the Division, of its Executive Committee and 
of the administrative committee of the Executive Committee, and be an ex officio 
member of all committees of the Division. She shall be a member of the Executive 
Committee of the board and of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation. 

She shall sign with the recording secretary all documents relating to the transfer 
of real estate and all other legal papers not otherwise provided for and make affidavit 
or acknowledgment that may be required or necessary thereto. With the responsible 
officer, she shall sign all official documents, including notes. 

She shall provide for the presentation of recommendations by the Division to the 
board and shall authorize the transmission of actions of the Division to the persons 
or groups concerned, unless otherwise ordered. She shall represent the Division in 
organizations or related meetings to which representation is not otherwise provided. 

Section 3. There shall be a vice-president of the Division who shall be elected 
by the Division at the quadrennial meeting. She shall actively aid in advancing the 
work of the Division. In the absence of the president, she shall preside at the meetings 
of the Division or of its Executive Committee. 

Should the office of president become vacant, the vice-president shall assume the 
duties of the office for the remainder of the year, or until the successor to the president 
shall have been elected. She shall be vice-president of the Assembly. She shall have 
responsibilities for promoting the use of the monthly program materials and the 
coordination of plans for program building. She shall be a member of the enlarged 
staff of the section. 

She shall be chairman of the standing Committee on the World Federation of Meth- 
odist Women and direct the work of presenting information on the World Federation 
of Methodist Women. 

She shall receive reports from the vice-presidents of the jurisdiction Woman's 
Societies of Christian Service, in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service. 

Section 4- There shall be three additional vice-presidents by virtue of their office 
as chairmen of the departments of the Division. In the absence of the president and 
the vice-president, one of these vice-presidents shall assume the duties of the pre- 
siding officer. 

Section 5. There shall be a recording secretary of the Woman's Division, elected 
by the Division at its quadrennial meeting. She shall give notice of all meetings 
of the Division and of its Executive Committee, keep a permanent record of all 
proceedings, see that each member of the Division receives a copy of the minutes of 
the annual meeting and of the Executive Committee meetings, present all recom- 



Bylaws — Woman's Division 235 

mendations of the Executive Committee to the Division, notify members of com- 
mittees of their appointments, and sign documents, with other responsible officer or offi- 
cers, as authorized. She shall be chairman of the Committee on Annual Report. She 
shall be secretary of the Assembly. 

Section 6. There shall be a treasurer of the Division, nominated by the Division 
and elected by the board at the quadrennial meeting. She shall hold the funds of 
the Division subject to authenticated drafts, and shall perform such other duties as 
usually pertain to the office of the treasurer. She shall also be charged with the re- 
sponsibility of receiving and holding all permanent funds, endowments, special funds, 
and securities of the Division according to the regulations of the Division and the board, 
and shall properly disburse the returns therefrom. She shall be a member of the 
Committee on Permanent Funds and Investments. In consultation with the committee 
she shall invest the funds entrusted to her care. She shall keep the funds for each de- 
partment separate. She shall be a member of the standing Committee on Financial 
Promotion of the section and a member without vote of the Committee on Policy of 
the Division. She shall have such ex officio relationships to the various parts and com- 
mittees of the Division as indicated in bylaws related to them. She shall be responsible 
for providing information for the Council on World Service and Finance as required 
by action of the General Conference. She shall make regular reports to the Division 
and its Executive Committee. 

Section 7. (1) There shall be an assistant treasurer for the funds of the Depart- 
ment of Work in Foreign Fields, nominated by the Division and elected annually by 
the board. She shall disburse the funds for this department with the supervision of 
the treasurer, according to the appropriations of the Woman's Division. 

(2) There shall be an assistant treasurer for the funds of the Department of Work 
in Home Fields, nominated by the Division and elected annually by the board. She 
shall disburse the funds for the department with the supervision of the treasurer, 
according to the appropriations of the Woman's Division. 

(3) There shall be an assistant treasurer with general duties, nominated by the 
Division and elected annually by the board. 

Section 8. There shall be a disbursing officer of the Division, nominated by the 
Division and elected annually by the board. She shall countersign all checks of the 
Woman's Division; she shall be vested with the responsibility of noting that all with- 
drawals are supported by proper documentary evidence and approvals thereon. 

Section 9. There shall be one or more executive secretaries of the Department 
of Work in Foreign Fields, nominated by the Division and elected by the board at 
the quadrennial meeting. They shall administer the work in foreign fields. Assign- 
ment of fields is by vote of the Division. 

The executive secretaries of the Department of Work in Foreign Fields shall 
supervise and administer the work in the special areas assigned to them in accordance 
with the plans and policies of the Woman's Division of Christian Service and the Board 
of Missions. They shall be the official correspondents of the Woman's Division with 
the missionary agencies, committees, and workers on these fields. They shall Btudy 
the needs of their respective fields and, through conferences with missionaries and na- 
tionals, they shall seek to secure a firsthand knowledge of the work. They shall repre- 
sent to the department the needs and opportunities in their fields. They shall receive 
askings from the field committees and shall present them annually to the standing 
Committee on Finance and Estimates of the Division. They shall cooperate with the 
bishops in charge of the fields, with the other secretaries of the department, and with 
the Division of World Missions, and shall seek to work out a unified policy of mission- 
ary administration on the fields. They shall represent the Division on committees of 
the Division of Foreign Missions of the National Council of the Churches of Christ 
in the U.S.A. 

The executive secretaries of the Department of Work in Foreign Fields shall 
make regular reports to the Division and its Executive Committee. 

There shall be associate and/or assistant secretaries as the needs of the work 
require. They shall be nominated by the Division for election by the board. 

Section 10. There shall be one or more executive secretaries of the Department 
of Work in Home Fields, nominated by the Division and elected by the board at the 
quadrennial meeting. They shall administer the work in home fields. Assignment of 
responsibilities is by vote of the Division. There shall be associate and/or assistant 



236 

secretaries as the needs of the work may require. They shall be nominated by the 
Division for election annually by the board. 

(1) The executive secretaries of the Department of Work in Home Fields shall 
supervise and administer the work in home fields as assigned to them in accordance 
with the plans and policies of the Woman's Division of Christian Service and the 
Board of Missions. They shall be the official correspondents of the Woman's Division 
with the agencies, committees, and workers in these fields. They shall study the needs 
of their respective fields and seek to have firsthand knowledge of the work. They 
shall present to the department the needs and opportunities in these fields. They shall 
receive askings from the fields and shall present them annually to the standing Com- 
mittee on Finance and Estimates of the Division. They shall conduct survey and 
research studies, promote conferences and institutes for workers and local board mem- 
bers. They shall cooperate with the staff of the Division of National Missions and 
other boards and agencies of the church carrying on similar work. They shall represent 
the Division on committees of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the 
U. S. A. to which they have been assigned. The executive secretaries of the Depart- 
ment of Work in Home Fields shall make regular reports to the Executive Committee 
and the annual meeting of the Division. 

(2) The executive secretary of the Commission on Deaconess Work shall per- 
form the duties assigned to her by the Department of Work in Home Fields and the 
Commission on Deaconess Work. She shall keep the records of the commission and 
the official records of all deaconesses. She shall act to complete the transfers of dea- 
conesses in the field and the licensing of deaconesses through the annual conference 
deaconess boards. 

She shall make recommendations to the Department of Work in Home Fields 
concerning the following matters: those eligible for the privilege of the sabbatical 
year; those requesting leave of absence; those entitled to retirement with pension, 
and the amounts necessary for study and pension. 

Section 11. There shall be an executive secretary for the Department of Christian 
Social Relations, nominated by the Division and elected by the board at the quad- 
rennial meeting. There shall be one or more associate secretaries nominated by the 
Woman's Division for election annually by the board. 

They shall promote the work of the Department of Christian Social Relations 
through jurisdiction, conference, district, and local Societies in line with the purpose as 
defined in the Constitution of the Woman's Division. They shall cooperate with the 
Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation in the promotion 
of those phases of the program of the Woman's Division for which there is joint 
responsibility. 

The executive secretary shall receive reports of work done in the jurisdictions and 
conferences and make reports to the executive committee and annual meetings of 
the Division. 

Section 12. There shall be an executive secretary of the Section of Education 
and Cultivation who shall be recommended by the Woman's Division of Christian 
Service to the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation for election by the board 
at the quadrennial meeting as one of the two general secretaries of the 
Joint Section of Education and Cultivation. She shall be responsible for the work 
of organization and promotion in the Woman's Division. She shall have general 
administrative responsibility for the work of the Woman's Section. She shall cooperate 
with the three departments of the Division in the promotion of their work. In co- 
operation with the secretaries of the Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education 
and Cultivation, she shall coordinate and further all phases of organization and pro- 
motion within the section. 

She shall be responsible for coordinating plans for officers' training and for the 
creation of plans and methods for the cultivation of the Woman's Society of Christian 
Service and for the extension of the organization throughout the church in the United 
States. 

She shall encourage the members of the Woman's Society to accept their respon- 
sibility to the total program of the local church. She shall be responsible for promoting 
fellowship activities. 

She shall recommend to the Division through the regular channels such field workers 
as the needs demand. 

She shall be a member ex officio of the Committee on Literature and Publications 
and shall cooperate with the editor or editors responsible for the creation of program 



Bylaws — Woman's Division 237 

and cultivation materials. She shall be a member of the standing Committee on 
Status of Women and a member ex officio of the standing Committee on Finance and 
Estimates of the Division, of the Committee on Organization and Promotion and the 
Committee on Financial Promotion in the section, and of the standing Committee of 
the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

She shall receive the reports of work done in jurisdictions and conferences and 
make regular reports to the annual and executive committee meetings of the Division. 

Section IS. There shall be a secretary of Missionary Education of the Section of 
Education and Cultivation who shall be recommended by the Woman's Division of 
Christian Service to the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation for election by 
the board at the quadrennial meeting as secretary of Missionary Education of the 
Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation. She shall col- 
late and publicize available missionary information and materials and present plans 
and methods for use by the constituency and develop interest in the support of the 
missionary work of the Woman's Division. She shall promote plans for missionary 
education through schools of missions, institutes, seminars, and special conferences. 
In cooperation with the three departments of the Woman's Division, the secretaries 
of the Section of Education and Cultivation, and of the Joint Section of Education 
and Cultivation, she shall direct and promote through the channels of the jurisdiction, 
conference, district, and local Societies, the study plans and study courses approved by 
the Woman's Division for the Woman's Society of Christian Service. She shall co- 
operate with other agencies of the church and interdenominational groups engaged in 
missionary education. She shall be a member ex officio of the Committee on Literature 
and Publications and shall cooperate with the editor or editors responsible for the 
creation of program and cultivation materials having to do with missionary education. 
She shall receive reports of work done in jurisdictions and conferences and make 
regular reports to the annual and executive committee meetings of the Division. 

Section 14- There shall be a secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild. She shall 
be elected by the board through the regular channel of nominations. Consideration 
will be given to recommendations from the standing Committee of the Guild. She shall 
promote the organization of the Wesleyan Service Guild, through the standing Com- 
mittee of the Guild, and through jurisdiction, conference, and district committees 
of which the Guild secretaries are chairmen. As a member ex officio of the Committee 
on Literature and Publications of the Woman's Division, she shall cooperate in such 
adaptation of materials as seem desirable. She shall represent the Woman's Division in 
organizations and movements touching the interests of employed women. She shall 
keep before the Division the needs and interests of employed women in their rela- 
tionship to the ongoing program of the Christian church. She shall be a member 
of the standing Committee on the World Federation of Methodist Women, of the 
standing Committee on Status of Women, of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild, of the standing Committee of the Department of Christian Social Rela- 
tions, and of the enlarged staff of the section, and an ex officio member of the standing 
Committees on Missionary Personnel and Finance and Estimates of the Division. She 
shall make regular reports to the annual and executive committee meetings of the 
Division. 

Section 15. There shall be the following associate secretaries in the Section of 
Education and Cultivation: a secretary of Field Cultivation, a secretary of Student 
Work, a secretary of Youth Work, a secretary of Children's Work, and a secretary of 
Audio-Visual Education; and such field workers as the needs of the work demand. 
These associate secretaries and the field workers shall be recommended by the Woman's 
Division to the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation through the Woman's 
Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation for election annually by 
the board. 

Section 16. The secretary of Field Cultivation shall consult with the executive 
secretaries of the Departments of Work in Foreign and Home Fields as to mission- 
aries and deaconesses who will itinerate. She shall establish a speakers' bureau, planning 
the itineraries of the field workers, the missionaries, deaconesses, and other speakers in 
consultation with the secretaries of the Woman's Section and the jurisdiction secretaries 
of Promotion and in cooperation with the General Section of the Joint Section of Edu- 
cation and Cultivation. She shall seek in every way to make such itineraries most effec- 
tive by conferring with speakers as to the best techniques of presenting the work and by 
helping conference officers to conserve the values of these itineraries. She shall study 



238 

the conferences and in cooperation with the executive secretary of the Woman's Section 
of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation and the jurisdiction and conference 
secretaries of Promotion plan for efficient cultivation. She shall take such speaking 
engagements as possible in the time available. 

Section 17. The secretary of Student Work shall promote the plans and programs 
for the Student Work of the Woman's Division through the Woman's Section of the 
Joint Section of Education and Cultivation. She shall work cooperatively with the 
secretary of Student Work in the General Section of the Joint Section of Education 
and Cultivation. She shall represent the work of these divisions in the Methodist 
Student Movement. 

She shall represent the Woman's Division in committees correlating student work 
and in such other committees, conferences, and meetings as concern student work in 
relation to the Board of Missions. She shall work with the staff of the Department 
of Student Work of the Board of Education in planning approaches to the campus 
and in arranging campus itineraries for missionaries and other speakers. She shall be 
a member ex officio of the standing Committee on Missionary Personnel of the Woman's 
Division. She shall cooperate with this committee in finding candidates. She shall be 
a member of the subcommittee on Missionary Education in schools, colleges, and 
theological seminaries, of the Interboard Committee on Missionary Education, and of 
the National Conference of Methodist Youth. 

She shall work also with the jurisdiction and conference secretaries of Student 
Work, and shall perform such other duties as the Woman's Division may define. 

She shall receive reports of Student Work done in jurisdictions and conferences 
and make regular reports to the annual and executive committee meetings of the 
Division. 

Section 18. The secretary of Youth Work shall be responsible for the preparation 
of plans and programs for the World Friendship groups of girls meeting regularly 
to study the work of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall promote 
the accepted plan of missionary education of youth through jurisdiction and confer- 
ence secretaries of Youth Work. She shall perform such other duties as the Division 
may define. She shall represent the Woman's Division in a subcommittee on Youth 
Work of the Interboard Committee on Missionary Education and in other meetings 
where youth interests are concerned. She shall be an ex officio member of the stand- 
ing Committee on Missionary Personnel of the Division and of the National Confer- 
ence of Methodist Youth. 

She shall receive reports of work done in jurisdictions and conferences and make 
regular reports to the annual and executive committee meetings of the Division. 

Section 19. The secretary of Children's Work shall be responsible for carrying 
out the plans for missionary education of children of preschool, primary, and junior 
age groups, as authorized by the Board of Missions. She shall promote missionary 
education of children through jurisdiction and conference secretaries of Children's 
Work according to the accepted plan. She shall perform such other duties as may be 
defined. She shall represent the Children's Work of the Board of Missions in the 
subcommittee on Children's Work of the Interboard Committee on Missionary^ Edu- 
cation, and in other committees concerned with the missionary education of children. 
She shall be a member of the standing Committee on the World Federation of Meth- 
odist Women. 

She shall receive reports of work done in jurisdictions and conferences and make 
regular reports to the annual and executive committee meetings of the Division. 

Section SO. The secretary of Audio-Visual Education shall promote the work of 
the Woman's Division of Christian Service by producing and distributing audio-visual 
materials including motion pictures, filmstrips, and other audio-visual materials to 
be used in education and cultivation and shall develop a program for the training of 
Woman's Society leaders and members in the most effective use of such materials. 
She shall cooperate with the department of visual education in the General Section 
of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation and with the Television, Radio and 
Film Commission of The Methodist Church. She shall make regular reports to the 
annual and executve committee meetings of the Division. 

Section SI. There shall be field workers of the Woman's Division of Christian 

Service, elected by the board, as the needs of the work may demand. All field 
workers shall itinerate throughout the Societies and Guilds of the conferences under the 



Bylaws — Woman's Division 239 

guidance of the secretary of Field Cultivation of the Division, the jursdiction and con- 
ference secretaries of Promotion, and the Division, jurisdiction and conference secretaries 
of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

The field worker shall seek to organize Societies and Guilds; she shall help to train 
leaders; she shall interpret the function and program of the Woman's Society of 
Christian Service and the Wesleyan Service Guild; and shall promote in all ways 
possible the work of the Division. 

Following each conference itinerary, the field worker shall report her activities 
within the conference to the Division secretary of Field Cultivation, to the jurisdiction 
and conference secretaries of Promotion and to the Division, jurisdiction, and conference 
secretaries of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

The field worker shall submit a statement of expenses involved in each confer- 
ence itinerary to the executive secretary of the Section of Education and Cultivation. 

Section tl. When a secretary or secretaries of Missionary Personnel are to be 
elected, suggestions shall be offered by the Woman's Division of Christian Service to 
the Committee on Nominations of the Joint Committee on Missionary Personnel. 

Section 23. There shall be an editor of The Methodist Woman, nominated by the 
Division and elected annually by the board. She shall be an editorial secretary of the 
Woman's Division. She shall have the entire responsibility for editing The Methodist 
Woman. As a member ex officio she shall work in cooperation with the standing Com- 
mittee on Literature and Publications. She shall take her proportionate share of re- 
sponsibility in the production of literature for the Division. She shall have full respon- 
sibility for the work allocated to her. She shall be a member of the standing Com- 
mittee on the World Federation of Methodist Women. She shall make regular reports 
to the annual and executive committee meetings of the Division. 

Section 21^. There shall be a woman editor of World Outlook, recommended by 
the Woman's Division to the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation through the 
Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation for election 
annually by the board. She shall be an editorial secretary of the Joint Section of 
Education and Cultivation and shall be responsible for editing the woman's share of 
World Outlook and the woman's share of all other joint publications. As a member 
ex officio she shall work in cooperation with the standing Committee on Literature and 
Publications. She shall take her proportionate share of responsibility in the produc- 
tion of literature for the Woman's Division. She shall have full responsibility for 
the work allocated to her. She shall be a member of the standing Committee on the 
World Federation of Methodist Women. She shall make regular reports to the annual 
and executive committee meetings of the Division. 

Section 25. There shall be an editor of Literature for the Woman's Division 
nominated by the Division and elected annually by the board. She shall be an edi- 
torial secretary of the Woman's Division. 

The editor of Literature, in cooperation with the standing Committee on Litera- 
ture and Publications, shall be responsible for creating and editing all programs, cul- 
tivation materials, and such other literature as may be required to meet the needs 
of the Division and of the jurisdiction, conference, and district Societies, and of So- 
cieties in the local church. She shall be a member of the standing Committee on the 
World Federation of Methodist Women. She shall make regular reports to the annual 
and executive committee meetings of the Division. 

Section 26. There shall be an associate editor of Literature, nominated by the 
Division and elected annually by the board. She shall be an editorial secretary of the 
Woman's Division. She shall work in cooperation with the standing Committee on 
Literature and Publications and take her proportionate share of the responsibility in 
the production of literature for the Division. She shall have full responsibility for the 
work allocated to her. She shall be a member of the standing Committee on the World 
Federation of Methodist Women. She shall make regular reports to the annual and 
executive committee meetings of the Division. 

Section 87. There shall be such additional editors and associate editors as the 
work may demand and as approved by the Woman's Division. 

Section 28. There shall be a publication and business manager, nominated by the 
Division and elected annually by the board. She shall be the business manager for 
the production, sale, and distribution of The Methodist Woman, and of the literature 



240 

of the Woman's Division. She shall be responsible for getting copy in correct form 
to the printers on schedule after due consultation with the responsible editor. She 

shall work in cooperation with the standing Committee on Literature and Publica- 
tions. She shall have the responsibility for determining the quantity of and placing 
the order for literature of other agencies to be handled by Literature Headquarters. She 
shall make regular reports to the annual and executive committee meetings of the 
Division. 

Section 29. There shall be a circulation manager and secretary of Literature nom- 
inated by the Division and elected annually by the board. She shall be responsible for 
the promotion of the sale of all literature authorized by the Woman's Division and by 
the Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation for the promo- 
tion of the work. She shall keep in touch with the jurisdiction and conference secre- 
taries of Literature and Publications, direct them in the evaluation and use of all 
literature, including the program materials of the Woman's Division, and secure from 
them reports concerning the suitability of the material to meet conference needs. She 
shall cooperate with the standing Committee on Literature and Publications. She shall 
make regular reports to the annual and executive committee meetings of the Division. 

Section SO. There shall be an Editorial Board, composed of the editors, the publi- 
cation and business manager, and the circulation manager. Immediately following the 
annual meeting of the Woman's Division, this board shall meet and organize, electing 
its own ohairman and secretary, and upon request of the responsible editor shall arrange 
among its members for any allocation of the work necessary. Details of publications 
shall be cleared through this board. The board shall make regular reports to the 
annual and executive committee meetings of the Division. 

Section 31. There shall be a meeting at regular intervals of the Woman's Division 
staff for the purpose of correlating the entire work of the Woman's Division and keep- 
ing each member informed concerning the total work of the Woman's Division. The 
staff shall elect its own chairman. The chairman shall be elected on the basis of 
rotation among the various staff groups, namely, the Department of Work in Foreign 
Fields, the Department of Work in Home Fields, the Department of Christian Social 
Relations, the Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation, the 
Editorial Board, the treasurers, and the secretaries of Missionary Personnel. The staff 
shall elect quadrennially two of its members, other than the treasurer, to serve as 
nonvoting members of the standing Committee on Policy of the Division. 

Article III. — Publications 

Section 1. The Woman's Division of Christian Service shall assume its propor- 
tionate share in editing and promoting the church-wide missionary magazine World 
Outlook and such other literature as may be needed for joint circulation. 

Section 2. There shall be a magazine entitled The Methodist Woman which shall 
be edited and published by the Woman's Division of Christian Service. This magazine 
shall represent and promote the policies, program, and work of the Woman's Division. 

Article rv. — Elections 

Section 1. The president, the vice-president, the recording secretary, and the 

chairmen of the three departments, who shall be vice-presidents of the Division, shall 
be nominated and elected by ballot at the quadrennial meeting. If the nominating 
ballot is a two-thirds ballot, it shall become the elective ballot. 

These officers shall be eligible for re-election to the same office for one additional 
term. 

Section 2. At the quadrennial meeting each member of the Division shall register 
a first and second choice for membership in a department. The president, vice-presi- 
dent, recording secretary, and chairmen of the three departments shall constitute a 
committee to arrange these choices into the membership of the departments. In each 

department there shall be at least one representative from each jurisdiction. 

Section 8. At the opening session of the quadrennial meeting there shall be 
elected by the Division, from its membership, a Special Committee on Nominations. 

This committee shall be composed of twelve women, two from each jurisdiction, 
and one bishop, appointed by the bishops of the Division. 

This committee shall present to the Division the nominations for election by the 



Bylaws — Woman's Division 241 

board of a treasurer or treasurers and assistant treasurers, a disbursing officer, the 
executive secretaries and other secretaries, the editors, the publication and business man- 
ager, the circulation manager and secretary of Literature, the field workers, the assistants 
to executive secretaries and other secretaries, nine members of the Division to serve on 
the executive committee of the board, twelve members-at-large of the board, six of 
whom shall be the presidents of the jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service. 
This committee shall nominate for election by the Division eight women for member- 
ship on the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation. 

Section 4- At the quadrennial meeting, the standing Committee on Nominations 
of the Division, composed of the vice-president and two members appointed by each 
department and by the Section of Education and Cultivation, shall present for nomi- 
nation and election by the Division, the chairmen and members of the standing com- 
mittees of the Division; and from the membership of the Section of Education and 
Cultivation, a chairman of the Section of Education and Cultivation in the Woman's 
Division; one member of the Woman's Division and one member of the staff for 
representation on the Commission on Promotion and Cultivation; six women of the 
Division for membership on the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild 
and three women for membership on the Commission on Deaconess Work. 

At the quadrennial meeting of the Division, the standing Committee on Nomina- 
tions shall recommend to the Division for nomination to the board the representatives 
of the Division on the Interboard Committee on Missionary Education. 

At the quadrennial meeting of the Division and thereafter at each annual meeting 
the standing Committee on Nominations of the Division shall recommend to the 
Division, for nomination to the board, representatives of the Division on the following 
committees of the board: 

1. Committee on Bylaws 

2. Committee on Finance 

3. Committee on Pensions 

4. Joint Committee on Missionary Personnel 

5. Committee on Salaries 

6. Committee on Minutes and Records 

At each annual meeting of the Division, except the quadrennial meeting, the 
standing Committee on Nominations shall recommend to the Division for presentation 
to the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation for election by the board, nomina- 
tions for the woman editor of World Outlook, a secretary of the Wesleyan Service 
Guild and the associate secretaries in the Woman's Section of the Joint Section of 
Education and Cultivation (viz., a secretary of Field Cultivation, a secretary of Stu- 
dent Work, a secretary of Youth Work, a secretary of Children's Work, and a secretary 
of Audio- Visual Education), the field workers, and the assistants to the executive 
secretary and the secretary of Missionary Education of the section. 

At each annual meeting of the Division, except the quadrennial meeting, the 
standing Committee on Nominations of the Division shall recommend to the Woman's 
Division nominations for election by the board of assistant treasurers, the disbursing 
officer, associate and assistant secretaries, the editors, the publication and business 
manager, and the circulation manager and secretary of Literature. 

At the quadrennial meeting and thereafter at each succeeding annual meeting 
of the Division, the standing Committee on Nominations shall present for election by 
the Division nominations for the members representing the Woman's Division on the 
Interdivision Committees on Work in Foreign Fields and Work in Home Fields. 

Section 5. At each annual meeting of the Division, the president, the vice-presi- 
dent, and the recording secretary shall appoint the members of the Division to serve 
on the following committees of the board during the period of the meeting: 

1. Committee on Appropriations for All Purposes 

2. Committee on General Reference 

3. Committee on Treasurers' Reports 

4. Committee on Resolutions, two members 

Section 6. Those officers, chairmen of committees, or members of committees 

elected at the quadrennial meeting, unless it is stated otherwise in the bylaws of the 
Division, shall hold office for the quadrennium or until their successors are elected. 
If a vacancy should occur by death, resignation, or otherwise, it may be filled at any 
regular meeting of the Division. 



242 

Section 7. Those officers, chairmen of committees, or members of committees, 
elected annually, shall hold office for one year or until their successors are elected. 
If a vacancy should occur by death, resignation, or otherwise, it may be filled at any 

regular meeting of the Executive Committee of the Division. 

Section 8. All officers and chairmen of committees shall be elected from the 

membership of the Division. 

Section 9. For an elected officer, who is on the payroll and shall have reached 
the age of retirement fixed by the pension plan of the Woman's Division, between an 
annual meeting and the following June 1, the date of retirement shall be June 1. If 
the age of retirement is reached between June 1 and the following annual meeting, 
the date of retirement shall be at the close of the annual meeting. 

Article V. — Finances 

Section 1. The work of the Woman's Division shall be supported by the monies 
derived from annual pledges or dues, special memberships, devises, bequests, annuities, 

special offerings, gifts, and monies raised for special projects or collected in meetings 
held in the interest of the work of the Division. 

Section 2. All funds from whatsoever source secured under the auspices of the 
Woman's Society of Christian Service, as auxiliary to the Woman's Division of Chris- 
tian Service, belong to the Division and shall be disbursed in accordance with its con- 
stitution and bylaws. 

Unless otherwise ordered by the Division, all monies secured by all organizations 
of the Division, except those for use in a local Society for local church and community 
activities, and the cultivation funds for jurisdiction, conference, district, and Societies 
in the local church, shall be sent to the conference treasurer and forwarded quarterly 
or monthly by her to the treasurer of the Division. The monies, which must be sent 
to the district and/or conference treasurer for forwarding to the Division, include 
bequests and devises to local Societies from decedent estates which are designated in 
whole or in part by the donor for home and /or foreign missions. 

Section S. Funds held by any of the conference or district treasurers shall be 
deposited in a banking institution in the name of the Woman's Society of Christian 
Service, as auxiliary to the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Section 4- The fiscal and appropriation year of the Woman's Division shall be 

June 1 to May 31. The fiscal year of the conference Woman's Society of Christian 
Service shall be June 1 to May 31. 

Section 5. The Division shall present its appropriations for approval by the 
board at the annual meeting. These appropriations shall not exceed the income for 
such purposes of the preceding fiscal year of the Division. 

Section 6. Appropriations for the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation shall 
be made by the Woman's Division and transmitted to the Joint Section of Education 
and Cultivation through the executive secretary of the Woman's Section of the Joint 
Section of Education and Cultivation. 

Appropriations made to the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation shall be 
adequate to cover the part of the total task that definitely belongs to the Woman's 
Division and to include an equitable proportion of the expense of all joint literature 
and other joint cultivation enterprises. 

Section 7. The Division shall appropriate annually a Contingent Fund of not 
less than two per cent nor more than four per cent of the total appropriations made 
by the Division, to be allocated proportionately to the three departments, to the 
Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation, and for General 
Administration. 

Section 8. Undirected income for appropriations shall be divided in the office of 
the treasurer of the Woman's Division on a basis to be agreed upon by the Division. 

Section 9. Provision for missionary projects shall be made within appropriations, 
the money to be sent to the treasurer of the Woman's Division by the local Society 
through the regular channels.* 

Section 10. All annuities shall be invested during the life of the annuitant. 

* Missionary projects are limited to: (a) Missionary and deaconess support, (b) Those projects desig- 
nated each year as Study Book Projects for the approved studies. 



Bylaws — Woman's Division 243 

Section 11. Undesignated gifts, bequests, and lapsed annuities given to the Division 
shall be divided equally between the Departments of Work in Home and Foreign Fields. 
These funds shall be held by the treasurer of the Division with the restricted funds as 
Home and Foreign Work credits to be voted out by the department concerned. 

Designated gifts, bequests, and lapsed annuities for any department of the Divi- 
sion, above the amount included in the basis of appropriation for the year 1941, shall 
become a part of the credits of the department designated and held with restricted 
funds subject to withdrawal upon vote of the department concerned. 

Section 12. The title to all real estate for use by institutions entirely supported 
by a conference or receiving support from a conference or its Societies in local 
churches, shall be vested either in the Woman's Division of Christian Service, or in 
the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service, provided it is incorporated. 

NOTE. — This applies to future conference incorporations. Existing conference 
corporations, holding institutions or properties which receive support from the former 
merging organizations, either locally or nationally, shall come into this relationship by 
voluntary action on a recommendation of the conference Society and approval of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

The title to all property, real and personal, specifically designated by the donor 
for the work of the Woman's Division of Christian Service within a conference, may 
be held by, and be vested in, the conference, provided it is incorporated; otherwise 
it must be held by the Woman's Division of Christian Service for the benefit of the 
conference. All property which is not specifically designated by the donor for work 
within a conference but which is transferred or paid to the conference through gift, 
bequest, or devise, shall be transferred or paid by the conference treasurer to the 
treasurer of the Woman's Division of Christian Service and credit on receipts given 
to the conference for the principal of the gift. 

Section IS. The Division shall authorize the creation of a revolving fund of 
$250,000 as a minimum. 

The procedure for use of the Revolving Fund shall be as follows: The treasurer 
shall be authorized to use the Revolving Fund for current operations as emergencies 
may arise. The Revolving Fund shall be balanced and the total amount shall be on 
hand at the end of each fiscal year. In the event of the liquidation of the Revolving 
Fund, the monies contributed at its inception shall be directed to the retirement and 
relief funds held for the payment of obligations to missionaries and deaconesses of the 
uniting boards and Societies in proportion to the amounts contributed by uniting boards 
and Societies. 

Section 14- There shall be Life Memberships, Honorary Life Memberships, and 
Honorary Life Patrons for the purpose of developing interest and increasing the 
finances of the Division. 

Life memberships for adults shall be $25; Honorary Life Memberships shall be 
$100; Honorary Life Patrons, $300. Honorary Youth Memberships shall be $15; Hon- 
orary Junior Memberships, $10; Honorary Baby Memberships, $5. 

Recognition of these special memberships shall be given by suitable pins or cer- 
tificates. 

Section 15. Memorial Memberships of $50 shall be one of the methods of de- 
veloping interest and increasing finances for the Division, the total from these Memorial 
Memberships to be used for missionary and deaconess retirement. 

Section 16. The Woman's Division of Christian Service shall observe an annual 
Week of Prayer and Self-Denial. The offering received during this period shall be 

divided equally between the Departments of Work in Home and Foreign Fields, and 
shall be used for missionary projects in addition to the funds received through the 
appropriations, as designated by the Woman's Division. 

NOTE. — Thank offerings, Christmas offerings, and Lenten offerings may be used 
as methods for securing the total budget (missionary funds and local funds) of the 
Woman's Society of Christian Service in each local church. 

Section 17. For use in the promotion of the work of the Division there may be 
cultivation funds in the Division and its auxiliary Societies, including the Wesleyan 
Service Guild, in the jurisdiction, conference, district, and the local church. 

One fourth of one cent per adult member of a conference Society shall be sent 
by the conference to the Division for the Division Cultivation Fund. This fund shall 



244 

be used to defray the expenses of board members annually to a meeting of their 
jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service and to one executive committee 
meeting of their conference Society. 

This fund shall be held as one for the Woman's Society of Christian Service and 
the Wesleyan Service Guild, the record of receipts from each group to be kept separate 
on the treasurer's books on jurisdiction, conference, and district levels. 

Section 18. There shall be a contributory pension plan in the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service. This plan shall be compulsory for all missionaries and deaconesses 
of the Woman's Division who were commissioned on or after July 25, 1940, or whose 
salary began on or after April, 1940. 

The pension plans which prevailed in the three constituencies shall apply to 
missionaries and deaconesses who were commissioned prior to July 25, 1940. 

Section 19. Cash secured for Supply Work shall be sent through the regular chan- 
nels — that is, from the treasurer of the Society in the local church to the district or 
conference treasurer and then to the treasurer of the Division. When cash is des- 
ignated for certain work, the treasurer of the Division shall forward the same direct 
to the project designated; if designated only for a department, the money shall be 
disbursed according to the recommendations of the department concerned. All such 
funds shall be over and above the pledge of any Society in the local church, district, 
or conference. 

Section SO. All monies secured by all units of the Wesleyan Service Guild except 
those for use in the local unit for local church and community activities and cultiva- 
tion funds shall be sent through the treasurer of the Woman's Society of Christian 
Service in the local church to the district or conference treasurer of the Woman's 
Society of Christian Service and then to the treasurer of the Division as Wesleyan 
Service Guild funds. 

Section SI. Fifty per cent of the receipts of the Methodist Youth Fund shall be 
contributed to the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

The annual conference treasurer shall send monthly one half of the receipts for 
that month to the treasurer of the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service 
for transmission by her to the treasurer of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 
The fifty per cent administered by the Woman's Division shall be clearly marked 
"Methodist Youth Fund" by each person handling the funds. 

The contributions from the Methodist Youth Fund shall be over and above the 
pledges of the adult Societies and shall be credited under conference income for ap- 
propriations. 

Section 22. Fifty per cent of the offerings of children received in additional ses- 
sions shall be contributed to the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

The annual conference treasurer shall send monthly one half of the receipts of 
the Children's Service Fund for that month to the treasurer of the conference Woman's 
Society of Christian Service for transmission by her to the treasurer of the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service. The fifty per cent administered by the Woman's Division 
shall be clearly designated as the "Children's Service Fund" by each person handling 
the funds. 

The offerings received from children in additional sessions shall be over and above 
the pledges of the adult Societies and shall be credited under conference income for 
appropriations. 

Article VI. — Section of Education and Cultivation 

Section 1. There shall be a Section of Education and Cultivation composed of the 
members of the Woman's Division of Christian Service who are members of the Joint 
Section of Education and Cultivation, the executive secretary, the assistant to the 
executive secretary, the secretary of Missionary Education, the assistant to the secretary 
of Missionary Education, the secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild, the associate 
secretaries of the Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation, 
two secretaries of Missionary Personnel, the editors, the publication and business man- 
ager, and the circulation manager and secretary of Literature. The president of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service, the vice-president of the Division, the treasurer 
of the Division, the chairmen of the standing committees on Spiritual Life, Literature 
and Publications, Status of Women, Supply Work, and Missionary Personnel, three 
executive secretaries of the Department of Work in Foreign Fields, three executive 



Bylaws — Woman's Division 245 

secretaries of the Department of Work in Home Fields, the executive secretary and 
two associate secretaries of the Department of Christian Social Relations shall be 
members ex officio. The presidents of jurisdiction Societies when present shall be 
coopted as members of the section. Interboard secretaries related to the Woman's 
Division, when present, shall be coopted. 

Those members of the section who are members of the Executive Committee of 
the Woman's Division shall constitute an executive committee of the section. The 
members of the staff who are members o^ the section and the ex officio members shall 
have the same relationship to the executive committee. 

Section t. The section or its executive committee, which is the section ad interim, 

shall meet in connection with the meetings of the Woman's Division. The agenda for 
the meetings shall be prepared by the chairman and the recording secretary in con- 
sultation with the executive secretary. 

Section S. It shall be the duty of the section to supervise and be responsible to 
the Woman's Division for the work assigned to it by the Division. It shall counsel 
and aid the secretaries of the section in their duties, and shall take all necessary measures 
to put into effect the actions of the Woman's Division. 

The section shall study the education, cultivation, and organization policies of the 
Woman's Division and shall formulate and present plans to the Division for the co- 
ordination and promotion of these policies through the Woman's Section of the Joint 
Section of Education and Cultivation. 

The section shall make recommendation to the Committee on Nominations of the 
Division in case of a vacancy among the elected staff of the section. 

Section 4. The section shall consider the annual budget of the Woman's Section 
of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation submitted by the executive secretary 
and make recommendations to the Committee on Finance and Estimates of the 
Woman's Division. 

Section 6. The section may provide such committees as it finds necessary. 

Section 6. The section shall receive reports from the secretaries and committees, 

and shall present reports to the Woman's Division and its Executive Committee. 

Section 7. At the quadrennial meeting the section shall appoint two members 
of the section to serve on the standing Committee on Nominations of the Division. 

Section 8. The chairman shall preside at all meetings of the section and of the 
executive committee of the section and shall perform the duties usually required 
of this officer. She shall be a member ex officio of all committees of the section. In 
the absence of the chairman, the section shall choose a chairman pro tern. 

faction 9. There shall be a recording secretary who shall record and file all minutes 
of the section and of the executive committee of the section. 

Section JO. There shall be a standing Committee on Organization and Promotion 

composed of the executive secretary, the assistant to the executive secretary, half the 
members of the section, the six jurisdiction secretaries of Promotion, the secretary of 
Field Cultivation, the field workers who have not been assigned to the standing Com- 
mittee of the Wesley an Service Guild, and the secretary of Promotion of the standing 
Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild. The editor responsible for the literature 
of this committee shall be a member ex officio. This committee shall meet annually. 

Section 11. There shall be a standing Committee on Missionary Education com- 
posed of the secretary of Missionary Education, the assistant to the secretary of Mis- 
sionary Education, half the members of the section and the six jurisdiction secretaries 
of Missionary Education, one jurisdiction secretary of Missionary Service in Foreign 
Fields, one jurisdiction secretary of Missionary Service in Home Fields, and the chair- 
man of the Committee on Missionary Education of the standing Committee of the 
Wesleyan Service Guild. The editor responsible for the literature of this committee 
shall be a member ex officio. This committee shall meet annually. 

Section It. There shall be a standing Committee on Student Work composed of 

the secretary of Student Work, three members of the section, and the six jurisdiction 
secretaries of Student Work. The editor responsible for the literature of this committee 
shall be a member ex officio. This committee shall meet annually. 



246 

Section 13. There shall be a standing Committee on Missionary Education of 

Youth composed of the secretary of Youth Work, three members of the section, the 
six jurisdiction secretaries of Youth Work, the member of the staff of the Joint Depart- 
ment of Missionary Education having responsibility for Youth Work, and the staff 
member of the Youth Department having responsibility for Methodist Youth Fund 
promotion. The editor responsible for the literature of this committee shall be a mem- 
ber ex officio. This committee shall meet annually. 

Section 14. There shall be a standing Committee on Missionary Education of 

Children composed of the secretary of Children's Work, three members of the section, 
the member of the staff of the Joint Department of Missionary Education having respon- 
sibility for Children's Work and the six jurisdiction secretaries of Children's Work. The 
editor responsible for the literature of this committee shall be a member ex officio. The 
committee shall meet annually. 

Section 15. There shall be a standing Committee on Financial Promotion. This 
committee shall develop and promote plans in line with policies approved by the 
Woman's Division for increasing the income of the Woman's Division. This com- 
mittee shall also give guidance through proper channels to the Committee on Finance of 
the local Society with reference to securing, channeling, and administering funds of the 
local Society. 

This committee shall be composed of the treasurer of the Woman's Division of 
Christian Service, the executive secretary of the Section of Education and Cultivation, 
the responsible editor, a representative of the Committee on Supply Work, members 
of the section who are members of the Committee on Finance and Estimates, and 
others desired by the section. The section shall provide that each department is rep- 
resented in the committee. 

Section 16. There shall be an Audio-Visual Advisory Committee to be composed 
of three members of the section representing each department, a member of the staff of 
the section, the treasurer of the Woman's Division, and the secretary of Audio-Visual 
Education. The chairman and executive secretary of the section shall serve as ex 
officio members. The secretary of the field or area of work concerned in a specific 
production under consideration shall be coopted for the meeting when that production 
is being discussed. 

It shall be the duty of this committee to bring recommendations on participation 
in cooperative films and filmstrip productions; to survey requests for production within 
the Woman's Division and assist in the decision on which requests can be granted; and 
to bring together in this office the production and distribution of all audio-visual ma- 
terials of the Woman's Division. 

Section 17. There shall be an enlarged staff in the Section of Education and 
Cultivation composed of the vice-president of the Division, the treasurer of the Division, 
the chairman of the standing Committee on Spiritual Life of the Division, the chairman 
of the section, the staff of the section, the editors, the publication and business manager, 
the circulation manager and secretary of Literature, the executive secretary and two 
associate secretaries of the Department of Christian Social Relations, three executive 
secretaries of the Department of Work in Home Fields, three executive secretaries of 
the Department of Work in Foreign Fields, a secretary of Missionary Personnel, and 
coopted members as needed. 

The duties of the enlarged staff shall be to receive and, when necessary, to bring 
recommendations to the section for the coordination of plans from the various depart- 
ments, committees, and individuals for general promotional methods, for leadership 
training, for jurisdiction and conference schools, institutes, workshops and seminars; 
for the programs of the Woman's Society and of the Wesleyan Service Guild. The 
responsibility for formulating and effecting these plans shall be delegated to the person 
or persons charged by the bylaws for that particular phase of the education and 
cultivation program. The enlarged staff also shall serve as a clearing house for dates 
for national seminars, workshops, institutes, conferences, and other meetings. 

The chairman of the enlarged staff shall be the executive secretary of the Section 
of Education and Cultivation. 

Article VII. — Standing Committees 

Section 1. There shall be the following standing committees of the Division ac- 
cording to the constitution: Executive Committee, Committee on Missionary Per- 



Bylaws — Woman's Division 247 

sonnel, Committee on Permanent Funds and Investments, Committee on Finance and 
Estimates, and a Committee on the World Federation of Methodist Women. 

There shall be also standing committees on Spiritual Life, Literature and Publi- 
cations, Library Service, Status of Women, Supply Work, Constitution and Bylaws, 
Nominations, Pensions, Policy, Salaries, the Wesleyan Service Guild, and an Adminis- 
trative Committee. These committees shall be elected quadrennially. 

Section 2. The Woman's Division shall provide such special committees as may 
be necessary for the conduct of the work. 

Section S. Staff members shall serve as nonvoting members of the committees 
which are concerned directly with their departments of work. 

Section 4. The Executive Committee of the Division shall be composed of the 
women members serving on the executive committee of the board, representing the 
three divisions and the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation. The membership 
of the committee shall include the president, the vice-president, the recording secretary, 
the chairmen of the three departments, the chairman of the Section of Education and 
Cultivation, the chairmen of the standing committees of the Division, and three bishops 
who are members of the Division. Other persons may be added as the needs of the 
Division may require. The executive secretaries and other secretaries, treasurers, the 
disbursing officer, editors, publication and business manager, and the circulation manager 
and secretary of Literature shall be members without vote. 

The Executive Committee, which is the Division ad interim, shall meet to review 
the work of the Division and to attend to any other necessary business. The meetings 
shall be held in connection with the meetings of the executive committee of the board 
The president, with the approval of three other members of the Executive Committee, 
may call a special session of the committee to meet an emergency. The Executive Com- 
mittee shall make a report of its action to the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 
A majority shall constitute a quorum. 

Section 5. The Division shall elect from the membership of its Executive Committee 
an administrative committee, composed of the president, the four vice-presidents, the 
recording secretary, the treasurer of the Division, the chairman of the Section of 
Education and Cultivation, one additional member from each of the departments 
and the executive secretaries. This committee shall meet at the call of the president 
and transact such business as necessitates the action of the Division in the intervals 
between the meetings of the Executive Committee of the Division. The executive 
secretaries and the treasurer shall be members without vote. 

Section 6. There shall be a standing Committee on Spiritual Life, composed of 
the chairman, one representative of the Woman's Division from each jurisdiction, the 
jurisdiction secretaries of Spiritual Life, the chairman of the Committee on Spiritual 
Life of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild, and such members 
from the Section of Education and Cultivation as the committee may determine. This 
committee shall endeavor to quicken the spiritual life of all Methodist women, to deepen 
their prayer life, and to increase their sense of responsibility for personal service and 
giving. The committee shall keep in touch with the spiritual movements of the times, 
and by prayerful research develop a clearer appreciation of the meaning of Christian 
living; it shall seek to devise definite means to permeate the local church with a 
spiritual power which will lead to deeper consecration and to more active service; to 
promote Christian stewardship, special studies, and the use of the Bible and other 
devotional materials. The committee shall give special attention to recommendation 
of books and pamphlets on the devotional life, including stewardship. The editor re- 
sponsible for the literature of this committee shall be a member ex officio. 

This committee shall assist the editors in the preparation of such Spiritual Life ma- 
terials as may be published by the Woman's Division of Christian Service. The resources 
of this committee shall be available to the leaders of all age groups within the Division 
and to institutions supported by the Division. 

Section 7. There shall be a standing Committee on Literature and Publications, 
composed of seven especially qualified women, a majority of whom shall be members 
of the Woman's Division, one the vice-president of the Woman's Division. The 
following shall be ex officio members: the editors, the circulation manager and secretary 
of Literature, the publication and business manager, the chairman and secretaries of the 



248 

Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation, the chairman of the 
Department of Work in Foreign Fields, and one executive secretary appointed by the 
department, the chairman of the Department of Work in Home Fields and one executive 
secretary appointed by the department, the chairman of the Department of Christian 
Social Relations, and the executive secretary of the department, the president of the 
Division, the treasurer of the Division, the chairman of the standing Committee on 
Spiritual Life, the vice-chairman of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service 
Guild, and a secretary of Missionary Personnel appointed by the standing Committee 
on Missionary Personnel. 

This committee shall be responsible to the Woman's Division for all printed 
materials recommended for use of the Societies and the Wesleyan Service Guilds, and 
shall survey the needs of the Woman's Division for such materials and shall formulate 
policies and plans for their publication and distribution. The committee shall meet 
semiannually. 

In connection with the Committee on Literature and Publications there shall be 
a Committee on Circulation which shall meet twice during the quadrennium. This 
committee shall be composed of the jurisdiction secretaries of Literature and Publica- 
tions, the circulation manager and secretary of Literature, the chairman of the Editorial 
Board, the chairman of the Committee on Literature and Publications, and such other 
members as may be deemed necessary. 

Section 8. There shall be a standing Committee on Finance and Estimates, com- 
posed of thirteen members of the Woman's Division as follows: the chairman and 
three members of each of the two administrative departments, the chairman and two 
members of the Department of Christian Social Relations, the chairman of the Section 
of Education and Cultivation, the president of the Woman's Division. The secretaries, 
treasurers, disbursing officer, editors, publication and business manager, circulation man- 
ager and secretary of Literature of the Woman's Division, and the secretaries and editor 
of the Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation shall be 
members without vote. 

It shall be the duty of this committee to study and recommend the financial 
policies of the Division, to keep informed with regard to its investments, and to 
recommend plans for increasing the income. It shall receive the estimates for the 
various lines of work of the Division and shall make recommendations for appropriations 
to the Woman's Division. 

There shall be elected from the membership of the Committee on Finance and 
Estimates a Committee on Treasury, to consist of three members. This committee 
shall act as an advisory committee of the treasurer's office. It shall study the audits 
and the functions of the office, and present recommendations concerning the same to 
the Committee on Finance and Estimates. 

Section 9. There shall be a standing Committee on Permanent Funds and In- 
vestments, consisting of six members, two of whom shall be the treasurer and the 
chairman of the standing Committee on Finance and Estimates. Four members 
shall be nominated by the Committee on Finance and Estimates from its membership 
and elected by the Woman's Division. In addition, the committee shall coopt from 
three to five persons who, by training, experience, and ability are qualified for service 
in investment and trust fund matters. Such coopted members shall be approved 
annually by the Woman's Division or its Executve Committee. 

This committee shall make recommendations to the treasurer for the investment 
of the money entrusted to her care. In an emergency the treasurer may act in con- 
sultation with three members of the committee designated by the committee. 

It shall be the duty of this committee to meet and review quarterly the invest- 
ments of the Division. Other meetings may be held at the call of the treasurer or of 
three members of the committee. This committee shall report regularly to the 
Executive Committee and annually to the Woman's Division. 

Section 10. There shall be a standing Committee on the World Federation of 
Methodist Women, composed of the vice-president of the Woman's Division, who 
shall serve as chairman; the vice-presidents who are chairmen of the departments of 
the Division; four secretaries of the Section of Education and Cultivation, one of 
whom shall be the secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild and one the secretary of 
Children's Work; the women editors; the chairman of the Committee on the Status 



Bylaws — Woman's Division 249 

of Women; the vice-president of each jurisdiction; any general officers of the Federation 
resident in this country; and such other members as may be needed. The jurisdiction 
representatives on the standing committee are, by virtue of their membership on this 
standing committee, members of the International Council of the World Federation of 
Methodist Women. 

The full committee shall meet twice during the quadrennium. 

This committee shall keep in touch with the officers of the World Federation and 
with the other units affiliated through the Federation; it shall keep the other units 
informed as to the work of the Woman's Division, and keep the Division in touch 
with the work of Methodist women of other lands. Under general direction of the 
Federation it shall collect and compile historical data of its own constituency as val- 
uable contributions to the expansion of the enterprise on the part of Methodist women. 
The committee shall propose to the Committee on Literature and Publications such 
literature as it may need. It shall recommend annually to the standing Committee 
on Finance and Estimates such amount as it deems its equitable and necessary share 
for the work of the Federation. All plans and projects of the committee shall be 
subject to the approval of the Division, to which the committee shall make annual 
report. 

Section 11. There shall be a standing Committee on Missionary Personnel of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service. The committee shall be composed of the 
women members from the Joint Committee on Missionary Personnel of the Board 
of Missions, the six jurisdiction secretaries of Missionary Personnel, and the women 
secretaries of the Joint Committee on Missionary Personnel. Executive secretaries 
of the Departments of Work in Home and Foreign Fields, secretaries of Youth Work, 
Student Work, Wesley an Service Guild, and the editor responsible for the literature of 
the committee shall be members ex officio. 

The duties of the committee shall be to cooperate with the secretaries of Missionary 
Personnel of the Board of Missions in interpreting standards for potential candidiates 
as required by the Joint Committee on Missionary Personnel; to interpret recruitment 
needs of the Woman's Division; to recommend to the Committee on Literature and 
Publications suggestions for literature in the interests of recruitment in conformity 
with the policies of the Joint Committee on Missionary Personnel; to recommend to 
the Joint Committee on Missionary Personnel ways in which recruitment may be 
made more effective. This committee shall meet annually. 

Section 12. There shall be a standing Committee on Library Service, composed of 
five members: a chairman elected by the Woman's Division of Christian Service, two 
other members of the Woman's Division, and a representative of the staff of the 
Department of Work in Foreign Fields and a representative of the staff of the De- 
partment of Work in Home Fields. The editor responsible for the literature of the 
committee shall be a member ex officio. It shall be the duty of this committee to study 
the need for books and periodicals in institutions and stations of the Division, abroad 
and at home, and to devise means and methods for supplying this need. This com- 
mittee shall meet annually. 

Section 18. There shall be a standing Committee on Status of Women which 
shall meet biennially, composed of the chairman, one Woman's Division member 
from each jurisdiction, the vice-president of the Woman's Division, a secretary from 
each of the three departments and the Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Educa- 
tion and Cultivation, the secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild, the chairman of the 
Committee on Status of Women of the Guild, one editor, and the six jurisdiction 
secretaries of Status of Women. 

It shall be the duty of the committee to gather and study pertinent information 
about the life and work of women in church and community in the United States and 
other lands. The committee shall make use of all studies and resources related to the 
status of women made available through the World Council of Churches and the 
United Nations. 

This committee shall also be responsible for planning and recommending to the 
Woman's Division a program for jurisdiction, conference, district, and local commit- 
tees on Status of Women. Such a program shall relate to the status of women in the 
life and work of the Church with special emphasis on The Methodist Church and to 
the opportunities open to women for service in the community or nation by election 
or appointment. 



250 

The chairman shall bring reports and recommendations to the Woman's Division 
from the standing committee. Recommendations of special concern to departments 
or other lines of work of the Woman's Division shall be referred by the Woman's 
Division to the respective department or line of work for implementation. 

The chairman shall be a member of the standing Committee on the World Fed- 
eration of Methodist Women. 

Section 14- There shall be a standing Committee on Supply Work, composed of 
the chairman of the committee, elected by the Division, one member each from the 
Department of Work in Foreign Fields and the Department of Work in Home Fields 
who are members of the Executive Committee of the Woman's Division, the chairman 
of the Committee on Supply Work of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild, and the jurisdiction secretaries of Supply Work. Others may be coopted 
as members as the need arises. Regular reports shall be made by the proper persons 
to the Division and its Executive Committee and to the Departments of Work in 
Home and Foreign Fields. 

This committee shall meet biennially at the time of an annual or executive com- 
mittee meeting of the Division. 

Section 15. There shall be a standing Committee on Constitution and Bylaws, 
whose members shall be recommended by the standing Committee on Nominations 
for election by the Division at the quadrennial meeting. Proposed amendments 
shall be cleared through the Woman's Division or its Executive Committee and 
referred to the Committee on Constitution and Bylaws not later than forty days 
before the annual meeting of the Division. This committee shall send all amend- 
ments referred to it by the Executive Committee to the members of the Division 
as least thirty days before the annual meeting of the Division. 

Section 16. There shall be a standing Committee on Nominations composed of the 
vice-president and two members appointed at the quadrennial meeting by each of 
the departments of the Division, and by the Woman's Section of the Joint Section of 
Education and Cultivation. At the quadrennial meeting for organization, this com- 
mittee shall make recommendations for nominations for the chairmen and members 
of the standing committees of the Division. 

Annually, this committee shall nominate representatives of the Division to serve 
on the standing committees of the board; annually, except at the quadrennial meeting 
for organization, this committee shall nominate those officers or secretaries and associ- 
ates or assistants who are to be elected annually by the Division or board. 

This committee shall receive all nominations of persons to be considered for 
election by the Woman's Division of Christian Service and for nomination by the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service to the Board of Missions of The Methodist 
Church, and shall make final nominations to the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

This committee shall make recommendations for nominations for vacancies which 
may occur ad interim, unless otherwise provided. 

Section 17. There shall be a standing Committee on Policy, composed of the 
president, the vice-president, the recording secretary, the chairmen of the three 
departments, one representative from each of the departments appointed by the 
departments, and the chairman of the Section of Education and Cultivation, and one 
representative from the section, appointed by the section, the chairman of the stand- 
ing Committee on Finance and Estimates, and three members of the staff without 
vote, one of whom shall be the treasurer of the Division. 

The committee shall formulate and recommend to the Division for action policies 
on subjects referred to it by the Division and committees of the Division. 

The committee may also initiate and recommend to the Division for action policies 
that concern the work of the Division as a whole, for the formulation of which no 
provision has been made. 

The committee may recommend for action by the Division changes in existing 
policies that affect the work of the Division as a whole. 

The committee may act in an advisory capacity on questions of procedure for 
the Division or its component parts, without official action or report until a policy 
on said procedure has been determined and voted. 

Section IS. There shall be a standing Committee on Salaries of four members, 
composed of the two representatives of the Woman's Division on the Committee 



Bylaws — Woman's Division 251 

on Salaries of the board and two others from the membership of the standing Com- 
mittee on Finance and Estimates of the Division. 

This committee shall be responsible for studying and recommending to the Division 
through the Committee on Finance and Estimates the standards of salaries and the 
salaries for all salaried persons of the Division elected by the board or the Division. 

Section 19. There shall be a standing Committee on Pensions composed of the 
two representatives of the Division on the Committee on Pensions of the board, the 
executive secretary of the Commission on Deaconess Work, the treasurer, the assistant 
treasurers, the disbursing officer of the Division, and a member of the staff of the 
Department of Work in Foreign Fields. 

The duty of the Committee on Pensions shall be to study problems and make 
recommendations to the Woman's Division concerning the pension plan of the 
Woman's Division for missionaries and deaconesses; to make presentations concern- 
ing pensions for home office workers to the Committee on Pensions of the board; 
and to study problems that may arise concerning payments to retired workers of the 
merging corporations, if referred by the Woman's Division. 

Section 20. There shall be a standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild, 
composed of the secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild, six members of the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service, six jurisdiction secretaries of the Wesleyan Service Guild, 
and six other Guild members who are especially qualified to work in this field. The 
treasurer of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, the executive secretary of the 
Section of Education and Cultivation and the editor responsible for the literature of 
the Wesleyan Service Guild shall be members ex officio of the standing committee. 

Section 21. Special Committees oj the Division. There shall be a Committee on 
the Annual Meeting of the Division, a Committee on the Annual Report, and a 
Committee on the Week of Prayer and Self-Denial. 

1. The Committee on the Annual Meeting of the Division shall be composed of 
the president, the vice-president, the recording secretary, in consultation with the 
chairmen of the three departments and the chairman of the Section of Education and 
Cultivation. The president shall be the chairman of the committee. 

This committee shall be responsible for setting up the schedule and program for 
the annual meeting of the Division. 

2. The Committee on the Annual Report shall be composed of the president, the 
recording secretary, the chairmen of the three departments, the chairman of the 
section, the executive secretary of the section, the editor of The Methodist Woman, 
the publication and business manager and the circulation manager and secretary of 
Literature. The recording secretary shall be the chairman of the committee. 

This committee shall recommend annually to the Division the size, content, 
format, and price of the Annual Report of the Division. 

3. The Committee on the Week of Prayer and Self-Denial shall be composed 
quadrennially of two representatives from the Department of Work in Foreign Fields, 
two representatives from the Department of Work in Home Fields and the editor of 
Literature. 

This committee shall receive from the two administrative departments recom- 
mendations of projects to be the objectives of the Week of Prayer and Self-Denial 
offering to be received in the fall following the next fiscal year. From this list the 
committee shall recommend to the Division at the annual meeting for approval the 
projects to be the objectives of such offering. 

Article VIII. — Suspension 

The preceding bylaws may be suspended at any annual meeting of the Division at 
which a quorum is present, by a two-thirds vote of the members present and voting, or in 
the interim between annual meetings by the Executive Committee at which a quorum 
is present, by a three-fourths vote of the members present and voting. 

Article IX. — Amendments 

Amendments to these bylaws may be made by majority vote at any annual meet- 
ing of the Division, provided a thirty-days' notice is given in writing to all members 
of the Division by the Executive Committee or by the standing Committee on Con- 
stitution and Bylaws of the Division. 



252 



Bylaws of the Departments of the Woman's Division 

The Departments of Work in Foreign and Home Fields 

Article I. — Membership 

The departments shall be composed of the chairmen elected by the Division, the 
members of the Woman's Division of Christian Service designated to the departments 
at the quadrennial meeting, the executive secretaries, associate and/or assistant secre- 
taries of the respective departments. The president of the Woman's Division of Christian 
Service, the treasurer, an assistant treasurer, and a secretary of the Joint Committee 
on Missionary Personnel are members. 

Article II. — Meetings 

Section 1. The annual meeting of a department shall be held in connection with 

the annual meeting of the Woman's Division. 

Section 2. In case of special need, other meetings may be called by the chairman 
and the executive secretaries of the department upon ten-days' notice. 

Section 8. The agenda for the annual meeting of the department shall be prepared 
by its chairman and recording secretary, in consultation with its executive secretaries. 

Article III. — Duties 

Section 1. Each department shall administer and be responsible to the Woman's 
Division for the work allocated to it by the Division. It shall receive for considera- 
tion and action any recommendations from the members and the committees of the 
department and the report and recommendations of the executive secretaries. 

Section 2. The department shall make recommendation to the Committee on 
Nominations of the Woman's Division in case of vacancy among the elected staff 
members. 

Section 3. Quadrennially the department shall appoint two members of the de- 
partment for membership on the standing Committee on Nominations of the Division. 

Section 4- Each department shall present an annual report to the Woman's 
Division. 

Article IV. — Officers 

Section 1. The vice-president of the Woman's Division, who is chairman of the 
department, shall preside at all meetings of the department, of its executive com- 
mittee and of its administrative committee, and shall perform the duties usually 
required of this officer. She shall familiarize herself with the work of the department 
and assist in the planning and the correlation of the work of the department. She 
shall be a member ex officio of all department committees. She shall be a member 
of the standing Committee on the World Federation of Methodist Women. In the 
absence of the chairman, the department shall choose a chairman "pro tern. 

The chairman of the department, as vice-president of the Division, in the absence 
of the president and vice-president of the Division, may assume the duties of the 
presiding officer of the Division. 

Section 2. There shall be a recording secretary of the department who shall record 
and file all minutes of the department, of the executive committee, and of the ad- 
ministrative committee. 

Article V. — Committee 

Section 1. There shall be an executive committee, composed of those membert 
of the Executive Committee of the Division who are members of the department. 
The executive committee shall hold meetings at the time of the meetings of the 

Executive Committee of the Division. It shall act ad interim for the department. 

Section 2. There shall be an administrative committee of the department, com- 
posed of the chairman, the recording secretary, and four other members from the 
executive committee, elected by the department, and the executive secretaries. This 
committee shall meet at stated intervals or at the call of the chairman, in consultation 
with the executive secretaries, and shall act ad interim for the executive committee. 



Bylaws of Departments 253 

Section S. There shall be a Committee on Finance and Estimates, composed of 
the chairman and the recording secretary and those members of the department who 
are members of the standing Committee on Finance and Estimates of the Division. 
It 6hall consider the field appropriations submitted by the executive secretaries, and 
make recommendations to the Division. It shall also make recommendations as to 
appropriations for cooperative committees and projects and for the administration of 
the department. It shall do such other work as the need may require. 

Section 4- There shall be foreign and home field committees, whose duties shall 
be to advise with the executive secretaries on all matters pertaining to their fields. 
They shall study and be familiar with all facts, problems, and conditions relating to 
their particular fields. These committees shall be elected by their respective depart- 
ments. 

Section 5. (1) There shall be a standing Committee of the Department of Work 
in Foreign Fields, composed of the chairman, the executive secretaries, associate and /or 
assistant secretaries of the department, the secretaries of Missionary Service in Foreign 
Fields in the jurisdictions, and such members of the Division as may be appointed by 
the department. 

(2) There shall be a standing Committee of the Department of Work in Home 
Fields, composed of the chairman, the executive secretaries, associate and/or assistant 
secretaries of the department, the secretaries of Missionary Service in Home Fields in 
the jurisdictions, and such members of the Division as may be appointed by the 
department. 

(3) The executive secretary and the secretary of Missionary Education of the 
Section of Education and Cultivation shall be members ex officio of these committees. 

(4) These committees shall meet annually. The chairman of the department 
shall be the chairman of the standing committee of the department. 

(5) Each standing committee shall study the work of its respective department, 
keep informed on world and national movements affecting missions, and share in the 
promotion of the entire missionary enterprise. 

Section 6. (1) There shall be an Interdivision Committee on Work in Foreign 
Fields with equal representation from the Division of World Missions and the Depart- 
ment of Work in Foreign Fields of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

(2) There shall be an Interdivision Committee on Work in Home Fields with equal 
representation from the Division of National Missions and the Department of Work 
in Home Fields of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

(3) The members representing the Woman's Division on these committees shall be 
nominated at the quadrennial meeting and at each succeeding annual meeting through 
the standing Committee on Nominations of the Division for election by the Division. 

Section 7. The policy with reference to voting by members of the staff shall be 
that adopted by the Division. 

The Department of Christian Social Relations 

Article I. — Membership 

The department shall be composed of the chairman, elected by the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service, the members of the Division designated to the depart- 
ment, and the secretaries of the department. 

The president and vice-presidents of the Division, other than the chairman of 
this department, shall be members ex officio. 

< The secretaries of the Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Culti- 
vation, the editors, the executive secretaries of the administrative departments, the 
chairman of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild, may be mem- 
bers and serve as consultants. 

Article II. — Meetings 

Section 1. The annual meeting of the department shall be held in connection with 
the annual meeting of the Woman's Division. 

Section 2. In case of special need, other meetings of the department may be called 
by the chairman of the department, in consultation with the executive secretary, upon 
ten-days' notice. 



254 

Section 3. The agenda for the annual meetings of the department shall be pre- 
pared by the chairman of the department and the secretaries. 

Article III. — Duties 

Section 1. The Department of Christian Social Relations shall promote the work 
of the Division along the lines of community service and social relations. It shall seek 
to make real and effective the teachings of Jesus as applied to individual, group, racial, 
and world relationships. It shall endeavor to enlist the participation of church women 
in such questions as have a moral or religious significance or an important bearing on 
public welfare. It shall seek to increase throughout the constituency an understanding 
of the fullest meaning of citizenship and the more effective use of the ballot by all 
citizens, in building world order, as well as in promotion of legislation for social welfare 
both national and international. The department shall be responsible for promoting 
study and action related to such concerns of Christians as the economic, social, and 
moral well-being of people in family and community, racial and cultural relations, 
alcoholic beverages and narcotic drugs, and world peace and security among all peoples. 
The department shall recommend ways of cooperating with other agencies with similar 
concern in the community, and initiate plans for recruiting and training church women 
for volunteer service in local church and community activities. It shall seek to cooperate 
with the other agencies of the church having similar purpose, endeavoring to develop 
Christian fellowship, and to deepen concern for the total responsibilities of the church. 

Section S. The department shall receive reports from the secretaries and recom- 
mend policies for the department to the Woman's Division. 

Section S. The department shall make recommendations to the Woman's Division 
for such workers in the department as may be essential for the supervision and pro- 
motion of the work of this department. 

Section 4- The department shall make recommendations to the Committee on 
Nominations of the Woman's Division when a vacancy occurs in the offices of the 
secretaries, or among the chairmen of the committees of the department elected by 
the Division. 

Section 5. Quadrennially the department shall appoint two members of the de- 
partment for membership on the standing Committee on Nominations of the Division. 

Section 6. The department shall make regular reports to the Woman's Division 

and its Executive Committee. 

Article IV. — Officers 

Section 1. The vice-president of the Woman's Division, who is chairman of the 
department, shall preside at all meetings of the department, of its executive com- 
mittee, and of the standing committee, and shall perform the duties usually required 
of this officer. She shall familiarize herself with the work of the department and 
assist in the planning and the correlation of the work of the department. She shall 
be a member ex officio of all department committees. She shall be a member of the 
standing Committee on the World Federation of Methodist Women. In the absence 
of the chairman, the department shall choose a chairman pro tern. 

The chairman of the department, as vice-president of the Division, in the absence 
of the president and the vice-president of the Division, may assume the duties of the 
presiding officer of the Division. 

Section t. There shall be a recording secretary of the department who shall 
record and file all minutes of the department, of the standing committee, and of the 

executive committee. 

Article V. — Committees 

Section 1. There shall be a standing Committee on Christian Social Relations, 
composed of the secretaries and the chairman of the department, the recording secretary 
of the department, the chairmen of the committees, the six jurisdiction secretaries of 
Christian Social Relations, and the chairman of the Committee on Christian Social 
Relations of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

The president and vice-presidents of the Division, other than the chairman of this 
department, shall be members ex officio. The secretaries of the Woman's Section of 



Bylaws — Wesleyan Service Guild 255 

the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation, the editors, the executive secretaries of 
the administrative departments, and chairman of the standing Committee of the 
Wesleyan Service Guild may be members. 

Section 2. The duties of the committee shall be to promote plans for the cultiva- 
tion of Christian Social Relations; to assist in the development of lines of research, 
study, and activities of the committees of the department; to recommend additional 
committees as need arises; to recognize the freedom of jurisdiction or conference to 
choose annually from the department program their lines of work ; to aid in harmonizing 
and organizing the results of the work for presentation to the Woman's Division of 
Christian Service. The committee shall emphasize the basic religious attitudes and 
objectives which underlie the work and which are indispensable to the realization of 
Christian social relations. 

Section S. The standing committee of the department shall meet annually at the 
time of the annual meeting of the Division, with special meetings called by the depart- 
ment chairman and the executive secretary when necessary. 

Section 4- The members of the Executive Committee of the Woman's Division 
who are members of the department, with the secretaries shall constitute an executive 
committee of the department. The executive committee shall meet at the time of 
the executive committee meetings of the Division. If need arises, special meetings 
may be called by the chairman and the executive secretary of the department. Addi- 
tional members of the standing committee specially related to the situation under 
consideration may be called in for regular or special executive committee meetings 
at the discretion of the chairman and the executive secretary. 

Section 5. There shall be a Committee on Finance and Estimates, composed of 
those members of the department who are members of the standing Committee on 
Finance and Estimates of the Woman's Division. 

In cooperation with the secretaries, the committee shall study the financial needs 
of the department and make recommendations to the department. It shall do such 
other work as the need may require. 

Section 6. The department shall recommend to the Woman's Division at the 
last meeting of each quadrennium those committees that may be needed to guide the 
department in the promotion of special emphases of the ensuing quadrennial program. 
All members of the department shall be assigned each quadrennium to these com- 
mittees, with the chairmen nominated at the organizational meeting by the department 
to the Division for election. Special consultants may be selected each quadrennium to 
serve as resource members of the committees. These committees shall meet annually. 

Article VI. — Suspension 

The preceding bylaws may be suspended at any annual meeting of the Division at 
which a quorum is present, by a two-thirds vote of the members present and voting, or 
in the interim between annual meetings, by the Executive Committee of the Division 
at which a quorum is present, by a three-fourths vote of the members present and voting. 

Article VII. — Amendments 

Amendments to the bylaws of the departments may be made at any annual 
meeting of the Division, provided a thirty days' notice is given in writing to all 
members of the Division by the Executive Committee or by the standing Committee 
on Constitution and Bylaws of the Division. 



Bylaws of the Wesleyan Service Guild 

Article I. — Name and Purpose 

Within the Woman's Division of Christian Service there shall be a Wesleyan 
Service Guild whose purpose shall be to provide a channel through which employed 
women may participate in the program of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, 
a program offering spiritual enrichment, Christian fellowship, and the opportunity to 
take an active part in developing a world Christian community. 



256 

Article II. — Authority 

General supervision of the work of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall be vested 
in a standing committee of the Woman's Division of Christian Service composed of 
the secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild, six members of the Woman's Division of 
Christian Service, six jurisdiction secretaries of the Wesleyan Service Guild, and six 
other Guild members who are especially qualified to work in this field. The treasurer 
of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, the executive secretary of the Section 
of Education and Cultivation and the editor responsible for the literature of the 
Wesleyan Service Guild shall be members ex officio of the standing committee. 

Article III. — Meetings 

Section 1. There shall be an annual meeting of the standing Committee of the 
Wesleyan Service Guild held in connection with the annual meeting of the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service. 

Section 2. Other meetings of the standing committee shall be held at the call 
of the chairman or of five members of the standing committee at such times as are 
necessary or desirable to carry on the work of the Guild. 

Article IV. — Officers and Their Duties 

Section 1. There shall be the following officers of the standing Committee of the 
Wesleyan Service Guild : a chairman, a vice-chairman, a recording secretary, a secre- 
tary of Promotion, and such other officers as the development of the organization 
may require. 

The officers of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall bear 
such responsibilities and perform such duties as usually appertain to such officers. 
The vice-chairman shall be chairman of the Committee on Program 

Section 2. There shall be a secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service and such additional staff members as may be required. 

Section S. The secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild and her staff shall pro- 
mote the organization and work of the Wesleyan Service Guild through the standing 
Committee of the Guild and through jurisdiction, conference, and district committees 
and secretaries. She shall cooperate in such adaptations of materials of the Committee 
on Literature and Publications of the Division as seem desirable. 

She shall be a member of the standing Committees on Status of Women and on 
World Federation of Methodist Women of the Division, of the standing committee of the 
Department of Christian Social Relations, and of the enlarged staff of the section. She 
shall be a member ex officio of the standing Committees on Finance and Estimates, on 
Literature and Publications, and on Missionary Personnel of the Division. 

She, or someone designated by her, shall represent the Woman's Division in organi- 
zations and movements touching the interests of employed women. She shall keep 
before the Division the needs and interests of employed women in their relationship 
to the ongoing program of the Christian church. She shall make regular reports to the 
executive committee and annual meetings of the Division. 

Article V. — Committees 

Section 1. There shall be the following committees in the standing Committee 
of the Wesleyan Service Guild: a Committee on Spiritual Life, a Committee on Mis- 
sionary Education and Service, a Committee on Christian Social Relations, a Committee 
on Status of Women, a Committee on Supply Work, and a Committee on Program. 

Section 2. There shall be an executive committee of the standing committee com- 
posed of the following members: the chairman of the standing committee, the vice- 
chairman, the recording secretary, and the secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 
Other members may be coopted as the need arises. 

The executive committee shall meet on call of the chairman in consultation with 
the secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the Woman's Division. 

Section S. The Committee on Program shall be composed of the vice-chairman 
and chairmen of committees of the standing Committee of the Guild. 

Section 4- There also shall be a Committee on Nominations whose duty it shall 
be to present nominations of members at large of the standing Committee of the Wes- 
leyan Service Guild. 

Section 5. Other committees may be added as the work demands. 



Bylaws — Commission on Deaconess Work 257 

Article VI. — Elections 

Section 1. The members of the standing committee shall be elected quadrennially 
as follows: 

(1) Six members of the Woman's Division elected by the Division at the organiza- 
tional meeting with due representation from the departments of the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service. 

(2) Six jurisdiction Guild secretaries elected at the jurisdiction Guild meetings. 

(3) Six representatives at large who are members of the Wesleyan Service Guild 
especially qualified to work in this field, elected by the members of the Woman's Divi- 
sion on the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild and the six jurisdiction 
Guild secretaries. 

(4) There shall be members ex officio as indicated in Article 2. 

Section 2. The secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the Woman's Division 
shall be elected annually by the Board of Missions. The standing Committee of the 
Guild may recommend the nominee. 

Section S. The officers of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild 
with the exception of the chairman shall be nominated and elected by ballot at the 
quadrennial meeting of the Guild. These officers shall be eligible for re-election to the 
same office for one additional term. 

Article VII. — Funds 

Section 1. The fiscal year of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall correspond to the 
fiscal year of the Woman's Division and the Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

Section 2. The funds of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall be administered by the 
treasurer of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, according to the constitution 
and bylaws of the Division. 

Article VIII. — Amendments 

Proposed amendments to all bylaws may be made at any annual meeting of the 
Woman's Division, provided a thirty days' notice is given in writing to all members of 
the Division by the Executive Committee of the Division or by the standing Committee 
on Constitution and Bylaws of the Division. Proposed amendments to the bylaws 
of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall be sent to the standing Committee of the Wes- 
leyan Service Guild in time for presentation to the September meeting of the Executive 
Committee of the Division. 



Bylaws of the Commission on Deaconess Work 

Article I. — Members 

Section 1. The membership of the commission shall follow the pattern described 
in the 1956 Discipline, Par. 1252, Sec. 3. 

Section 2. Voting members of the commission shall serve for a term of four 
years and may serve not more than two terms in succession. 

Section 3. The Missionary Personnel secretary of the Board of Missions shall be 
that secretary who has the major responsibility for the recruitment of deaconesses. 

Section 4- The executive secretaries of the Department of Work in Home Fields 
of the Woman's Division of Christian Service shall be coopted to serve on the com- 
mission with the privileges of the floor without vote. 

Section 5. When a regular member of the commission is unable to attend the 
annual meeting of the commission, an alternate for that member may be named by 
the organization to be represented at the meeting. 

Section 6. The secretaries of Missionary Service in Home Fields of the jurisdiction 
Woman's Societies of Christian Service shall be invited to attend meetings of the com- 
mission and in the absence of a president of a jurisdiction Society the secretary of 
Missionary Service in Home Fields of that jurisdiction shall serve as alternate, 



258 

Article II. — Officers 

Section 1. The officers shall be a chairman, a vice-chairman, and a recording 
secretary. 

Section 2. The bishop appointed by the Council of Bishops shall serve as chair- 
man of the commission. 

Section S. A vice-chairman shall be elected by the commission who shall act in 
the absence of the chairman. 

Section 4- The recording secretary shall keep the records of the meetings of the 
commission and of the executive committee and perform such other duties as may be 
assigned by the commission. 

Section 6. The executive secretary shall administer the work of the commission 
and such other functions as may be assigned to her by the Department of Work in 
Home Fields of the Woman's Division; shall prepare the agenda for the annual meet- 
ing and see that its recommendations are fulfilled; shall recommend plans of work; 
shall conduct the business of the commission; and shall make an annual report to the 
commission. 

Article III. — Meetings 

Section 1. The commission shall meet annually and may meet on call of the chair- 
man and the executive secretary. 

Section 2. A majority of the members shall constitute a quorum. 

Article IV. — Functions 

Section 1. The commission shall make plans for the enrichment of life of deacon- 
esses, recommending techniques for attaining spiritual and mental maturity, physical 
and professional fitness, emotional stability, and social adjustment. 

Section 2. It shall promote and interpret the program of deaconess work through- 
out the church to enable the office of deaconess to grow into the fullness of its stature. 

Section S. It shall seek to discover new fields of service and new approaches to 
meet the needs of the present day. 

Section 4- It shall seek to activate and strengthen the work of the annual con- 
ference Deaconess Boards. 

Section 5. It shall recommend to the Woman's Division of Christian Service poli- 
cies and procedures regarding the deaconesses, their work and relationships. 

Section 6. It shall approve all material which is to be published for the promo- 
tion of deaconess work. 

Article V. — Committees 

Section 1. The commission may create such committees as the work may demand. 

Section 2. There shall be an executive committee composed of the officers of the 
commission, the three representatives from the Woman's Division, and the presidents of 
the jurisdiction Deaconess Associations to act for the commission ad interim, a com- 
mittee on nominations and a committee on bylaws. 

Section S. There shall be a committee, appointed by the Department of Work in 

Home Fields, which shall serve in an advisory relation to the executive secretary of the 
commission. 

Article VI. — Rules of Order 

Section 1. The rules contained in Roberts' Rules of Order shall govern the com- 
mission in all cases to which they are applicable and in which they are not inconsistent 
with the constitution and bylaws of the commission. 

Section 2. Proposed amendments to these bylaws may be made, on the recom- 
mendation of the Commission on Deaconess Work to the Woman's Division, by a ma- 
jority vote, at any annual meeting of the Division, provided a thirty-days' notice is 
given in writing to all members of the Division by the Executive Committee of the 
Division or by the standing Committee on Constitution and Bylaws of the Division. 
Such changes must be in the hands of the Executive Committee of the Woman's Division 
by the September meeting. 



259 
Bylaws of the Assembly 

Article I. — Name 

The national meeting of the Woman's Society of Christian Service of The Meth- 
odist Church shall be called the Assembly. 

Article II. — Purpose 

The purpose shall be to provide a means whereby groups of Methodist women 
from all areas of the church may achieve essential unity in worship and in the sharing 
of information, plans, and methods of work. 

Article III. — Membership 

Section 1. Voting members. The officers and members of the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service, six officers of each jurisdiction Woman's Society, the president and 
one other officer of each conference Woman's Society, one Wesleyan Service Guild 
representative from each conference, one delegate from each district, and such other 
persons as the Division niay determine shall constitute the voting membership. 

Stction 2. Distinguished guests, missionaries, officers, and secretaries of the other 
divisions of the Board of Missions, representatives of other Methodist boards and of 
interdenominational or cooperating agencies may be seated and granted the privileges 
of the floor without vote. 

Article IV. — Meetings 

The Assembly shall meet quadrennially at such time and place as the Division may 
designate. Adequate appropriation for the Assembly meeting shall be made by the 
Division. 

There shall be a quadrennial meeting of the Wesleyan Service Guild held in con- 
nection with the Assembly of the Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

Article V. — Officers 

The president, vice-president, recording secretary, and treasurer of the Division 
shall serve the Assembly as its general officers. 

Article VI. — Duties of Officers 

The officers of the Assembly shall bear such responsibilities and perform such 
duties as usually appertain to such officers. The recording secretary shall be a member 
of the Program Committee and shall see that printed copies are sent to speakers and 
officers of the Division and jurisdictions two weeks before the meeting. She shall 
keep a record of all proceedings of the Assembly and shall have such record included 
in the Annual Report of the Division as the Division may determine. Assistant secre- 
taries ma}' be elected by the Assembly to serve during the session. 

The treasurer shall receive and disburse funds for expenses of the Assembly in 
accord with appropriations and the direction of the Division. 

Article VII. — Committees 

There shall be the following committees and such others as the Assembly may 
require : 

Section 1. Committees appointed by the Division. 

(1) Committee on Arrangements, to provide a suitable place for the Assembly 
meeting and to be responsible through subcommittees for credentials, transportation, 
and local arrangements. 

(2) Program Committee, to prepare an informing and inspiring program which 
shall include reports of the work of the departments of the Division, of its standing 
committees, of its research commissions, and the activities of the jurisdictions. 

(3) Budget Committee, composed of the chairmen of the Committees on Arrange- 
ments and on Program, and three members of the standing Committee on Finance 
and Estimates of the Division. 

(4) Committee on Publicity, consisting of the women editors and appointed re- 
porters. This committee shall provide preliminary announcements to the church and 
secular press, report the proceedings of the Assembly, and be responsible for an 
Assembly bulletin. 

(5) Committee of Reference, to which may be referred memorials, resolutions, re- 
ports, or any controversial matters before final action by the Assembly. 



260 

Article VIII. — Commissions 

Research and study commissions, in harmony with the purpose of the Assembly 
as set forth in the constitution, may be appointed to serve for four years, full reports 
to be made to the Assembly. 

Article IX. — Amendments 

Amendments to these bylaws may be made by majority vote at any annual 
meeting of the Division, provided a thirty days' notice has been given in writing to 
all members of the Division by the Executive Committee or by the standing Committee 
on Constitution and Bylaws of the Division. 

Bylaws of the 
Jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service 

Article I. — Officers 

Section 1. The president shall preside at all meetings of the jurisdiction Woman's 
Society and of the executive committee. She shall actively promote all phases of 
the work. She shall be a member ex officio of all committees. She shall sign orders 
for the disbursement of jurisdiction funds. She shall be one of the members-at-large 
of the Woman's Division of Christian Service and of the Board of Missions. She shall 
be a member of such cooperative boards and committees as the Discipline provides. 

Section 2. The vice-president shall assist actively in promoting the interests of 
the work and, in the absence of the president, shall assume the duties of that office. 

She shall be responsible for assisting in promoting plans and methods for the 
use and development of the monthly program materials as related to the duties of 
the Committee on Program in the local Society. She shall be a member of the standing 
Committee on the World Federation of Methodist Women. She shall cooperate as 
directed by the vice-president of the Division in presenting information on _ the 
World Federation of Methodist Women. She shall be a member of the Committee 
on Schools of Missions and Christian Service in the jurisdiction. 

She shall receive reports from the vice-presidents of the conference Woman's 
Societies of Christian Service and report to the vice-president of the Division in 
accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Section 3. The recording secretary shall keep a permanent record of all meetings 
of the Society and of the executive committee. She shall send minutes of executive 
committee meetings to each officer. She shall send to the members notices of all 
regular and special meetings of the jurisdiction Society and of the executive com- 
mittee. She shall present the recommendations of the executive committee to the 
Society and notify all committees of their appointments. She shall perform such other 
duties as may be assigned to this office. 

Section 4- The treasurer shall receive the funds which conferences have desig- 
nated for jurisdiction cultivation and expenses, and such other funds given for that 
purpose, including offerings taken at jurisdiction meetings. She shall disburse these 
funds upon the written order of the president and the secretary of Promotion of the 
jurisdiction Woman's Society. She shall send itemized statements of all funds to 
these officers and make an annual report to the jurisdiction Woman's Society. Her 
books shall be audited annually. She shall be a member of the standing Committee 
of the Wesleyan Service Guild in the jurisdiction. She shall be responsible for pro- 
moting larger gifts, annuities, and bequests in her jurisdiction. 

Section 5. There shall be a secretary of Missionary Service in Home Fields and 
a secretary of Missionary Service in Foreign Fields. These secretaries shall be the 
jurisdiction representatives on the corresponding standing committees of the Depart- 
ments of Work in Home and Foreign Fields of the Woman's Division. 

They shall study the work and interpret the reports of these departments, keep 
informed on world and national movements affecting missions, and within the juris- 
diction shall share in the promotion of the entire missionary enterprise. They shall 
be members of the Committee on Schools of Missions and Christian Service in the 
jurisdiction. 



Bylaws — Jurisdiction Woman's Society 261 

They shall be responsible as resource persons for assisting the secretary of Mis- 
sionary Education of the jurisdiction in bringing to the entire jurisdiction information 
concerning the work of the Departments of Work in Home and Foreign Fields. 

They shall keep the Departments of Work in Home and Foreign Fields of the 
Woman's Division informed as to ways in which the departments can assist in making 
the interest in their work more vital to the women of the jurisdiction. 

They shall be responsible for maintaining such contacts with the missionaries and 
with work sponsored by the conferences within the jurisdiction as the Departments 
of Work in Home and Foreign Fields may deem advisable in order to increase the 
interest of the conferences in the work they are sponsoring. They shall receive annual 
reports from the conference secretaries of Missionary Education and Service. 

They shall report annually to the jurisdiction Woman's Society. 

Section 6. The secretary of Christian Social Relations shall promote the work of 
the department within the jurisdiction. She shall be chairman of the standing Committee 
on Christian Social Relations within the jurisdiction, and plan with the committee the 
special lines of work to be emphasized. She shall cooperate with other organizations of 
the church and with other agencies working toward similar ends. She shall cooperate 
with the secretary of Missionary Education and the secretary of Spiritual Life in the 
planning and promotion of the total study program and the action following therefrom. 
She shall be a member of the Committee on Schools of Missions and Christian Service 
and the Committee on Finance in the jurisdiction. She shall receive reports from the 
conference secretaries of Christian Social Relations in accordance with the pattern of 
the Woman's Division of Christian Service and transmit them to the executive secretary 
of the department of the Woman's Division. She shall report annually to the jurisdiction 
Woman's Society. She shall be a member of the standing committee of the Department 
of Christian Social Relations within the Division. 

Section 7. The secretary of Promotion shall promote, in cooperation with the con- 
ference secretaries of Promotion, the total program of the Woman's Society of Chris- 
tian Service. She shall supply them with plans and methods for the cultivation of 
the Woman's Societies and for the extension of the organization throughout the 
jurisdiction. In cooperation with the executive secretary of the Section of Educa- 
tion and Cultivation she shall conduct workshops on organization and promotion 
to the end that a trained leadership may be developed in the conferences. In co- 
operation with the secretary of Field Cultivation of the Section of Education and 
Cultivation and with the conference secretaries of Promotion, she shall plan itineraries 
of field workers, missionaries, deaconesses, and other speakers. She shall be responsible 
for giving information concerning the organization and its work. She shall, with the 
president, sign orders for the disbursement of jurisdiction funds. She shall receive 
reports of the conference secretaries of Promotion in accordance with the pattern of 
the Woman's Division of Christian Service and send an analysis to the executive 
secretary of the Section of Education and Cultivation. She shall report annually to 
the jurisdiction Woman's Society. She shall be a member of the standing Committee 
on Finance, of the Committee on Schools of Missions and Christian Service, and of 
the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild in the jurisdiction. 

Section 8. The secretary of Missionary Education, in cooperation with the 
secretary of Missionary Education of the Section of Education and Cultivation, 
and with the secretaries of Missionary Education and Service in the conferences, 
shall direct study plans and promote study courses approved by the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service. She shall provide missionary information, develop 
interest in the support of missionary work, and make recommendations con- 
cerning the projects* submitted to the jurisdiction by the secretaries of Missionary 
Service in Home and Foreign Fields of the jurisdiction. She shall assist the secretary 
of Missionary Education of the Section of Education and Cultivation in planning such 
conferences, schools, and other meetings as will help develop missionary intelligence and 
a trained leadership in the jurisdiction. She shall be a member of the Committee on 
Schools of Missions and Christian Service in the jurisdiction, and of the Committee on 
Spiritual Life. She shall work in close cooperation with the secretary of Christian Social 
Relations and with the secretary of Spiritual Life in promotion of study plans. She 
shall keep in touch with denominational and interdenominational agencies engaged in 
missionary education. She shall receive reports of the secretaries of Missionary Educa- 
tion and Service in the conferences and transmit them to the secretary of Missionary 

* See footnote page 242. 



262 

Education and Service of the Section of Education and Cultivation in accordance with 
the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall report annually 
to the jurisdiction Woman's Society. 

Section 9. The secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall serve as chairman of 
the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild in the jurisdiction and shall 
preside at the meetings of the jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild. She shall promote 
the work of the Wesleyan Service Guild within the jurisdiction. She shall receive 
reports from conference secretaries of the Wesleyan Service Guild; she shall report 
annually to the Woman's Society of Christian Service of the jurisdiction and, in accord- 
ance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, to the secretary 
of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She 
shall be responsible for planning of meetings of the jurisdiction Wesleyan Service 
Guild. She shall represent the Wesleyan Service Guild and present its interests at the 
meetings of the jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service, of which she shall 
be an officer. She shall attend as far as possible conference meetings of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild. She shall be a member of the executive committee of the jurisdiction 
Woman's Society, of the Committee on Schools of Missions and Christian Service, of 
the Committee on Finance, and of the Committee on Spiritual Life. She shall present 
a budget to the Committee on Finance. 

Section 10. There shall be a secretary of Student Work. She shall promote the 
work according to the plans and program approved by the Woman's Division. She shall 
report, in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, 
to the Division secretary of Studf nt Work, and annually to the jurisdiction Woman's 
Society. 

She shall cooperate wherever possible with the regional program of the Meth- 
odist Student Movement, with the regional counselor and regional chairman of the 
World Christian Community and on Christian Social Action. 

Section 11. The secretary of Youth Work shall promote the work according to 
the plans and program approved by the Woman's Division. She shall report annually 
to the jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service. She shall receive reports from 
the conference secretaries of Youth Work, and report, in accordance with the pattern 
of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, to the secretary of Youth Work in the 
Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation. 

Section 12. The secretary of Children's Work shall promote the work according 
to the plans and program approved by the Woman's Division. She shall receive reports 
of secretaries of Children's Work in the conferences and transmit them, in accordance 
with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, to the Division secretary 
of Children's Work. She shall report annually to the jurisdiction Woman's Society. 

Section 13. The secretary of Spiritual Life shall serve as chairman of the standing 
Committee on Spiritual Life, and, working through this committee, she shall promote 
the plans and program approved by the standing Committee on Spiritual Life of the 
Woman's Division. She shall be a member of the standing Committee on Spiritual Life 
of the Division, and of the standing Committee on Schools of Missions and Christian 
Service of the jurisdiction. She shall receive reports of the secretaries of Spiritual Life 
in the conferences, and report, in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service, to the chairman of the standing Committee on Spiritual Life of 
the Woman's Division. She shall report annually to the jurisdiction Woman's Society. 

Section 14- The secretary of Literature and Publications shall make a careful study 
of all literature of the Woman's Division, including the program materials, and report 
concerning its suitability to meet the needs of Woman's Societies. She shall promote 
the circulation of The Methodist Woman and World Outlook in cooperation with the 
other responsible agencies of the church. She shall receive reports of secretaries of 
Literature and Publications in the conferences and transmit them, in accordance with 
the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, to the circulation manager 
and secretary of Literature of the Woman's Division. She shall be a member of the 
Committee on Schools of Missions and Christian Service in the jurisdiction. She shall 
report annually to the jurisdiction Woman's Society. 

Section 15. The secretary of Supply Work shall be responsible for promoting 
interest in the sending of needed supplies to institutions and agencies in the home 
and foreign fields, under the supervision of the Woman's Division. She shall be a mem- 



Bylaws — Jurisdiction Woman's Society 263 

ber of the standing Committee on Supply Work of the Division. She shall send the 
plans and policies approved by the Woman's Division Committee on Supply Work 
to the conference secretaries of Supply Work, and report to the chairman of the stand- 
ing Committee on Supply Work of the Woman's Division in accordance with the pattern 
of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall report annually to the juris- 
diction Woman's Society. 

Section 16. The secretary of Status of Women shall promote the program on 
Status of Women as recommended by the Woman's Division. Such a program shall 
relate to the status of women in the life and work of the Church with special emphasis 
on The Methodist Church and to the opportunities open to women for service in 
community and nation either by election or appointment. 

She shall be a member of the standing Committee on Status of Women of the 
Woman's Division, and promote the use of any special materials on Status of Women 
that may be recommended by the Woman's Division. 

She shall serve as chairman of the jurisdiction standing Committee on Status of 
Women, receive reports from the conference secretaries of Status of Women, and report, 
in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, to the 
chairman of the standing Committee on Status of Women of the Woman's Division. 
She shall report annually to the jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

Section 17. The secretary of Missionary Personnel shall promote the work of 
recruiting and counseling prospective candidates for missionary and deaconess service. 
She shall be responsible for giving information to the conference secretaries of Mis- 
sionary Personnel concerning the need for workers, requirements for missionary and 
deaconess service, available scholarship aids, literature on missionary personnel, and 
educational institutions preferred for study. She shall receive reports from the con- 
ference secretaries of Missionary Personnel and report, in accordance with the pattern 
of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, to the secretaries of Missionary Personnel 
of the Board of Missions. 

Article II. — Standing Committees 

Section 1. The jurisdiction Woman's Society may provide such standing com- 
mittees as the work may require. 

Section 2. There shall be an executive committee, composed of the officers of the 
jurisdiction Woman's Society, two or more members of the Woman's Division resident 
in the jurisdiction, the chairmen of standing committees of the jurisdiction, and such 
additional persons as the jurisdiction Woman's Society may provide. This committee 
shall be the coordinating group for the total educational and promotional program in 
the jurisdiction, and shall appoint an officer to be responsible for publicity in the press. 

Section 3. There shall be a standing Committee on Spiritual Life, composed of 
the jurisdiction secretary of Spiritual Life, the jurisdiction secretary of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild, the jurisdiction representative on the standing Committee on Spiritual 
Life of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, and the jurisdiction secretary of 
Missionary Education. This committee shall promote the plans and programs ap- 
proved by the standing Committee on Spiritual Life of the Woman's Division. It 
shall study the spiritual needs of the jurisdiction and make recommendations to the 
standing Committee on Spiritual Life of the Division. The members of this com- 
mittee shall serve as resource persons in the jurisdiction. 

Section 4- There shall be a standing Committee on Christian Social Relations, 
to be elected by the jurisdiction Woman's Society, composed of the jurisdiction secre- 
tary, three to five conference secretaries of Christian Social Relations, and one or more 
representatives of the Wesleyan Service Guild nominated by the jurisdiction standing 
Committee on Wesleyan Service Guild. Such members may or may not be members 
of the jurisdiction Woman's Society. The members of the department's resource com- 
mittees living within the jurisdiction shall serve as members ex officio of the jurisdiction 
standing committee. This committee shall meet annually and make recommendations 
concerning the work of the department within the jurisdiction in accord with the lines 
of work outlined by the Division. 

Section 5. There shall be a Committee on Schools of Missions and Christian 
Service, with a chairman elected annually by the committee. 

This Committee on Schools of Missions and Christian Service shall be composed 



264 

of the secretaries of Missionary Education, Christian Social Relations, Spiritual Life, 
Promotion, Wesleyan Service Guild, Literature and Publications, Missionary Service in 
Home and Foreign Fields, the vice-president, and such other members as may be 
authorized by the executive committee. 

The responsibility for formulating and effecting the plans of the committee shall 
be delegated to the person or persons charged by the bylaws for that particular phase 
of the education and cultivation program. 

This committee shall plan and promote a jurisdiction School of Missions and 
Christian Service which shall give emphasis to the world mission of the Christian 
Church, through an integrated program of missionary education, Christian social rela- 
tions, spiritual life cultivation, and program building; and which shall train leadership 
for the promotion of the total program of the Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

The committee shall meet at least once annually to determine the general plans 
for the jurisdiction school and to make recommendations concerning the school to the 
executive committee of the jurisdiction. 

Plans and recommendations developed in the school shall be sent by the com- 
mittee to the conferences in the jurisdiction for the use of the conference Committee 
on Schools of Missions and Christian Service. 

The chairman of the jurisdiction Committee on Schools of Missions and Christian 
Service shall see that a complete report of the work of the jurisdiction school is sent 
to the secretary of Missionary Education of the Section of Education and Cultivation. 

Section 6. There shall be a standing Committee on Status of Women, composed 
of the jurisdiction secretary and two other members, who shall promote the plans and 
program approved by the standing Committee on Status of Women of the Woman's 
Division. This committee shall study the status of women in the local church, community, 
state, nation, and in other lands, and shall make recommendations to the standing 
committee of the Division. 

Section 7. There shall be a Committee on Annual Meeting Program, composed 
of the president, the vice-president, the recording secretary, and such other members 
as may be needed. The committee shall elect its chairman annually. 

Section 8. There shall be a standing Committee on Finance, composed of the 
president, the secretary of Promotion, the secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild, 
and the treasurer of the jurisdiction Society, as chairman, and such other members as 
the jurisdiction Society may determine. This committee shall plan the budget for 
jurisdiction expenses and estimate the amount needed from each conference Society 
for this purpose. This amount shall be submitted to each conference Society for 
approval. 

Section 9. There shall be one cultivation fund for the Woman's Society of Chris- 
tian Service and the Wesleyan Service Guild, the records of receipts from each group 
to be kept separate on the treasurer's books. 

Section 10. There shall be a Committee on Committees of the jurisdiction Woman's 
Society. This committee shall be composed of the vice-president of the Society and 
six other members. It shall be the duty of this committee to nominate the members 
of the standing committees, and to make nominations to fill vacancies which occur 
ad interim in standing committees. 

Section 11. There shall be a Committee on Nominations whose duty it shall be 
to find specially qualified women in the jurisdiction who may serve as officers and as 
chairmen of standing committees. 

Article III. — Elections 

Section 1. Each jurisdiction Woman's Society shall choose its own method of 
election. Jurisdiction officers shall take office at the close of the meeting in which they 
are elected. 

Section 2. At the last meeting of the quadrennium of the jurisdiction Woman's 
Society of Chrisitan Service preceding the meeting of the jurisdictional conference of 
the church, the jurisdiction Woman's Society shall nominate twice the number of 
women required from that jurisdiction (see 1956 Discipline), for membership on the 
Board of Missions. These nominations shall be made from a list of names — three from 
each conference Woman's Society of the jurisdiction — and shall be forwarded to the 
jurisdictional conference of the church for the election of the required number. 



Bylaws — Jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild 265 

Section S. The jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service at the last 
meeting preceding the Assembly shall elect delegates to the Assembly according to 
the stated membership of the Assembly. (See bylaws of the Assembly, Art. Ill, Sec- 
tion 1.) 

Article IV. — Bylaws 

Section 1. Each jurisdiction Woman's Society may make such bylaws as the 
needs of the jurisdiction require, provided they are in harmony with the constitution 
and bylaws of the Woman's Division. 

Article V. — Amendments 

Amendments to these bylaws may be made by majority vote at any annual 
meeting of the Division, providing a thirty-days' notice is given in writing to all members 
of the Division by the Executive Committee of the Division or by the standing Com- 
mittee on Constitution and Bylaws of the Division. 

Proposed bylaws must be in the hands of the recording secretary of the Division in 
time for presentation to the September meeting of the Executive Committee of the 
Division. 

Bylaws of the Jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild 

Article I. — Name 

Within the jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service there shall be for 
employed women a jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Article II. — Purpose 

The purpose of the jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild shall be to plan and direct 
the work of the Wesleyan Service Guild within the jurisdiction in accordance with the 
constitution and bylaws of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Article III. — Membership 

Representatives from the Wesleyan Service Guilds in the conferences, the number 
to be determined by the jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild according to its require- 
ments, such conference officers of the Wesleyan Service Guild as the jurisdiction Wes- 
leyan Service Guild may determine, members of the jurisdiction Wesleyan Service 
Guild standing committee, and members of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild of the Woman's Division of Christian Service residing within the juris- 
diction shall be members of the jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Article IV. — Officers and Their Duties 

Section 1. There shall be a secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild who shall be 
the presiding officer of the jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild. There also shall be a 
recording secretary. 

Section 2. These officers shall be elected from the membership of the Wesleyan 
Service Guilds within the jurisdiction. 

Section S. (1) The secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall preside at the 
meetings of the jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild and serve as chairman of the 
standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the jurisdiction. She shall 
promote the work of the Wesleyan Service Guild within the jurisdiction; she shall 
receive reports from conference secretaries of the Wesleyan Service Guild in accordance 
with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service ; she shall report annually 
to the Woman's Society of Christian Service of the jurisdiction and to the secretary 
of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She 
shall be responsible for planning of meetings of the jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild; 
she shall represent the Wesleyan Service Guild and present its interests at the meetings 
of the jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service, of which she shall be an officer. 
She shall attend, as far as possible, conference meetings of the Wesleyan Service Guild 
and shall be a member of the executive committee of the jurisdiction Woman's Society 
of Christian Service. She shall present a budget to the Committee on Finance of the 
jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service. 



266 

(2) The recording secretary shall keep the minutes of the jurisdiction meetings 
and perform such other duties as may be authorized by the jurisdiction Wesleyan 
Service Guild. 

Article V.— Meetings 

There shall be an annual meeting of the jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild where 
reports shall be received and necessary business transacted. This meeting may be 
combined with a Guild Weekend at which time there may be a program of inspiration. 

Article VI. — Committees and Their Duties 

Section 1. There shall be a standing committee of the jurisdiction Wesleyan 
Service Guild composed of the secretary of the jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild, 
the recording secretary, the conference secretaries of the Wesleyan Service Guild, the 
secretary of Promotion of the jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service, the 
treasurer of the jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service, two other repre- 
sentatives of the Woman's Society of Christian Service to be elected by the jurisdiction 
Wesleyan Service Guild, any member of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild residing within the jurisdiction. Such additional members as the work 
demands may be coopted. 

Section 2. The standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the juris- 
diction shall assist in the planning of the work of the Wesleyan Service Guild within 
the jurisdiction. The committee may set up subcommittees to carry on the work of 
Spiritual Life. Missionary Education and Service. Christian Social Relations, Status of 
Women. Supply Work, and Literature and Publications, the chairmen of which shall 
be members of the standing committee. 

Section 3. There shall be a Committee on Nominations composed of three to 
seven members, whose duty shall be to present nominations of all officers. 

Article VII. — Elections 

Section 1. The officers of the jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild, the two repre- 
sentatives of the jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service to serve on the 
standing Committee of the Guild, and the Committee on Nominations shall be elected 
quadrennially at a meeting of the jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild. The term of 
office and the time of assuming office shall conform to that prevailing in the jurisdiction 
Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

Section 2. Vacancies occurring ad interim shall be filled for the remainder of the 
term involved by the standing committee of the jurisdiction Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Section 3. The election of the jurisdiction secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild 
shall be confirmed by the jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

Article VIII. — Amendments 

Proposed amendments to these bylaws may be made, on the recommendation of 
the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the Woman's Division to the 
Division by a majority vote, at any annual meeting of the Division, provided a thirty 
days' notice is given in writing to all members of the Division by the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Division or by the standing Committee on Constitution and Bylaws of 
the Division. 

Proposed amendments to bylaws of the Wesle\-an Service Guild shall be sent to 
the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the Woman's Division in 
time for recommendation to the September meeting of the Executive Committee of the 
Division. 

Bylaws of the Jurisdiction Deaconess Association 

Article I. — Members 

Section 1. The membership of the association shall follow the pattern described 
in the 1956 Discipline, Par. 1253, Sec. 2-a, b, c. 

Section 2. A deaconess on leave of absence shall be a member of the Deaconess 
Association of the jurisdiction in which she holds her church membership while on 
leave. 



Bylaws — Jurisdiction Deaconess Association 267 

Section S. A deaconess serving in a connectional office of the church shall be a 
member of the association in the jurisdiction in which she holds her church membership. 

Section 4- The ministerial representative to the commission from a jurisdiction 
shall be an associate member of the Deaconess Association of that jurisdiction. The 
name of the ministerial representative of a jurisdiction Deaconess Association shall 
be reported to the jurisdictional conference for record. 

Article II. — Officers 

Section 1. The officers of the jurisdiction Deaconess Association shall be a presi- 
dent, a vice-president, a secretary, and a treasurer. 

Section 2. The officers and the deaconess and ministerial representatives on the 
commission shall be nominated by a nominating committee with the privilege of 
nominations from the floor and elected by ballot. 

Section S. The president and treasurer shall be elected at the beginning of the 
quadrennium and the secretary and vice-president, two years later. 

Section 4- Officers shall serve a term of four years and may serve only two terms 
in succession. 

Article III. — Duties of Officers 

Section 1. The president shall preside at all meetings of the association and of 
the executive committee and shall perform all duties that ordinarily pertain to the 
office. 

Section 2. The vice-president shall serve in the absence of the president and shall 
be chairman of the program committee. 

Section S. The secretary shall carry out the duties that ordinarily devolve upon 
a secretary as prescribed in Roberts' Rules of Order. 

Section 4- The treasurer shall collect dues; disburse funds subject to the order 
of the president; and make an annual report to the association of all receipts and 
disbursements. 

Article IV. — Election of Members to the Commission 

Section 1. The president of the Deaconess Association, if a deaconess, shall be one 
of the four representatives from the association to the Commission on Deaconess Work. 

Section 2. The method of choosing the ministerial representative shall be decided 
by the association. The election shall take place before the quadrennial meeting of 
the jurisdictional conference. 

Section 3. When a representative of the jurisdiction Deaconess Association can- 
not attend the annual meeting of the commission, the executive committee of the 
association may appoint an alternate unless alternates are otherwise provided for. 

Article V. — Meetings 

Section 1. Special sessions may be called by the president in consultation with the 
executive committee. 

Section 2. Notification of any meeting shall be given at least thirty days prior 
to the date of the meeting, and a majority of the members present shall constitute a 
quorum for any session. 

Article VI. — Committees 

Section 1. There shall be the following committees of the association: an executive 
committee, a committee on program, a committee on bylaws, a committee on nomina- 
tions, and such other committees as the work may require. 

Section 2. The executive committee shall consist of the officers of the association, 
the deaconess representative on the commission, and a representative of the Woman's 
Society of Christian Service who is a member of the jurisdiction Deaconess Association 
named by the association. This committee shall meet annually and may meet on the 
call of the president in consultation with the members. A majority of the members 
shall constitute a quorum. This committee shall act ad interim for the association. 



268 

Section 8. The committee on program shall arrange the program of the association. 

Section 4- The committee on bylaws shall make a careful study of the legislation 
of General Conference and of the actions of the Commission on Deaconess Work which 
affect the deaconess. It shall recommend to the association such changes as are needed 
in the bylaws and standing rules of the association. 

Section 5. The committee on nominations shall submit names of persons for 
election to all offices in the association upon the consent of such persons. 

Section 6. The committee on program, bylaws and nominations shall be stand- 
ing committees and appointed by the executive committee. 

Article VII. — Finances 

Section 1. The association shall assess dues and determine the amount of the 
dues at any regular meeting. 

Section 2. Any authorized expense incurred by the officers in carrying out their 

duties shall be paid from the treasury of the association. 

Article VIII. — Bylaws and Amendments 

Section 1. Other bylaws may be made by the association in harmony with the 
constitution and bylaws of the jurisdiction Deaconess Association prescribed by the 
commission. 

Section 2. Proposed amendments to these bylaws shall be submitted by a ma- 
jority vote of the commission to the Woman's Division at any annual meeting of the 
Division, provided a thirty- days' notice is given in writing to all members of the Division 
by the Executive Committee of the Division or by the standing Committee on Constitu- 
tion and Bylaws of the Division. Such changes must be in the hands of the Executive 
Committee of the Woman's Division by the September meeting. 



Bylaws of the 
Conference Woman's Society of Christian Service 

Article I. — Officers 

Section 1. The president shall preside at all meetings of the conference Woman's 
Society of Christian Service and of the executive committee. She shall actively 
advance all the interests of the work. She shall sign all orders on the treasury. She 
shall be a member ex officio of all committees. She shall be a member of the juris- 
dictional Board of Missions and of the conference board and of such other cooperative 
boards and committees as the Discipline may provide. 

Section 2. The vice-president shall perform the duties of the president in her 
absence, and actively assist in promoting the interests of the Society. She shall be 
responsible for assisting in promoting plans and methods for the use and development 
of the monthly program materials as related to the duties of the Committee on Program 
in the local Society. She shall cooperate as directed by the vice-president of the 
jurisdiction in presenting information on the World Federation of Methodist Women. 
She shall perform such other duties as the conference Society may require. 

She shall receive reports from the vice-presidents of the district Woman's Societies 
of Christian Service and report to the vice-president of the jurisdiction Woman's Society 
in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Section 3. The recording secretary shall give notice of all meetings of the con- 
ference Society and of the executive committee. She shall keep a permanent record 
of all proceedings and send a copy of the minutes of the executive committee to 
each officer. She shall present all recommendations of the executive committee to 
the conference Society and notify all committees of their appointment. She shall 
prepare and issue the annual report of the conference Society. 

Section 4- The treasurer shall receive the Woman's Division funds of the Woman's 
Society of Christian Service in the local church quarterly or monthly from the 
treasurer of the local Society, or from district treasurers, as the conference Society 
may direct. She shall remit such funds without division to the treasurer of the 



Bylaws — Conference Woman's Society 269 

Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall make an annual report to the 
conference Society. She shall disburse funds upon the written order of the conference 
president and the secretary of Promotion, and shall send an itemized statement of all 
finances to these officers. Her books shall be audited annually by a certified public 
accountant and the auditor's report presented to the conference Society. She shall 
be bonded in such sum and upon such conditions as the Woman's Division may 
determine. She shall be a member of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service 
Guild in the conference. 

Section 5. The secretary of Promotion shall promote the total program of the 
Woman's Society of Christian Service. In cooperation with the district secretaries of 
Promotion she shall provide for leadership training; she shall supply the Societies with 
information concerning the work; she shall seek to organize a Society in every church in 
the conference. In cooperation with the jurisdiction secretary of Promotion, and with 
the district secretaries of Promotion, she shall plan the itineraries of field workers, 
missionaries, deaconesses, and other speakers. She shall sign all orders on the treasury. 
Immediately after the election of conference Society officers, she shall send a list of the 
officers to the secretary of Promotion of the jurisdiction and to the executive secretary 
of the Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation. She shall 
report annually to the conference Society and to the secretary of Promotion of the 
jurisdiction Society and to the executive secretary of the Woman's Section of the 
Joint Section of Education and Cultivation in accordance with the pattern of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall be a member of the standing Com- 
mittee on Finance, of the Committee on Schools of Missions and Christian Service, and 
of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild in the conference. 

Section 6. The secretary of Missionary Education and Service shall be responsible 
for missionary education in the conference and for the promotion of study courses in 
the Societies. She shall provide missionary information, recommend missionary projects* 
and develop interest in their support. She shall recommend to the conference Society 
the study courses approved by the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall 
assist in planning and promoting missionary conferences and schools of missions, 
and educational conferences and seminars sponsored by the Woman's Division. She 
shall cooperate with the secretaries of Spiritual Life and of Christian Social Relations 
through the Committee on Study and Action for the coordination of the study. She 
shall cooperate also with the conference Board of Missions in its program of missionary 
education and with interdenominational agencies engaged in missionary education. She 
shall report annually to the conference Society and to the jurisdiction secretaries of 
Missionary Service in Home and Foreign Fields, and to the jurisdiction secretary of 
Missionary Education, and to the secretary of Missionary Education of the Woman's 
Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation in accordance with the pat- 
tern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. Where advisable, this work may be 
promoted by two secretaries, one in charge of Missionary Education and one in charge 
of Missionary Service. Where there are two secretaries, both shall be members of the 
standing Committee on Study and Action. 

Section 7. The secretary of Christian Social Relations shall develop and direct the 
work of the conference through district and local secretaries of Christian Social Relations. 
She shall serve as chairman of the conference standing Committee on Christian Social 
Relations. She shall be a member of the conference Committee on Schools of Missions 
and Christian Service, a member of the conference Committee on Finance, a member 
of the standing Committee on Study and Action. She shall guide the women in the 
studies and action growing out of the program emphasis of the Department of Christian 
Social Relations. She shall cooperate with other organizations of the church and with 
other agencies working toward similar ends. She shall report annually to the conference 
Society and to the jurisdiction secretary of Christian Social Relations and the execu- 
tive secretary of the department in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service. 

Section 8. The secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall preside at the meet- 
ings of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild and serve as chairman of the conference 
standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild. She shall promote the work 
of the Wesleyan Service Guild within the conference; she shall receive reports from 
district secretaries of the Wesleyan Service Guild; she shall report to the Woman's 
Society of Christian Service of the conference and to the secretary of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild of the Woman's Division of Christian Service in accordance with the 



See footnote page 242, 



270 

pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall be responsible for 
planning of meetings of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild; she shall represent 
the Wesleyan Service Guild and present its interests at the meetings of the conference 
Woman's Society of Christian Service of which she shall be an officer. She shall attend 
as far as possible district meetings of the Wesleyan Service Guild and shall be a member 
of the executive committee of the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service. 
She shall be a member of the conference Committees on Schools of Missions and Chris- 
tian Service, and on Finance. She shall present a budget to the Committee on Finance. 

Section 9. The secretary of Student Work shall promote the plans and program 
approved by the Woman's Division. She shall report annually to the conference 
Woman's Society and to the jurisdiction secretary of Student Work and the secretary 
of Student Work of the Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Culti- 
vation in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

She shall work also in cooperation with the state, or similar region, Student 
Council of the Methodist Student Movement, with the state director and student 
chairmen of the World Christian Community and Christian Social Action Committees, 
and wherever possible with the Inter-Conference Commission on Student Work. 

Section 10. The secretary of Youth Work shall promote the work according 
to the plans and program approved by the Woman's Division. She shall be a 
member of the Committee on Schools of Missions and Christian Service in any 
conference where there is a summer school for girls. She shall report annually to 
the conference Society. She shall receive reports from the district secretaries of Youth 
Work and report to the jurisdiction secretary of Youth Work and to the secretary of 
Youth Work in the Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education and Cultivation 
in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall 
be elected by the Woman's Society of Christian Service after consultation by the 
Committee on Nominations with the conference Council of the Methodist Youth Fel- 
lowship relative to a nominee for the office. 

Section 11. The secretary of Children's Work shall promote the work aecording 
to the plans and program approved by the Woman's Division. She shall receive reports 
from the district secretaries of Children's Work. She shall report annually to the 
conference Society and to the jurisdiction secretary of Children's Work and the 
secretary of Children's Work in the Woman's Section of the Joint Section of Education 
and Cultivation in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Society of Christian 
Service. 

Section 12. The secretary of Spiritual Life shall endeavor to quicken the spiritual 
life of Methodist women. Working through the standing committee, she shall seek 
to permeate the church with spiritual power which should lead to deeper consecration 
and more effective Christian service. She shall be a member of the standing Com- 
mittee on Study and Action. She shall report annually to the conference Society and to 
the jurisdiction secretary of Spiritual Life in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service. She shall be a member of the conference Committee on 
Schools of Missions and Christian Service. 

Section IS. The secretary of Literature and Publications shall be responsible for 
the distribution of literature throughout the conference. She shall make a careful 
study of all the literature of the Woman's Division, including the program materials, 
and report concerning its suitability to meet conference needs. She shall promote 
the circulation of The Methodist Woman throughout the conference, and in cooper- 
ation with other responsible agencies of the church she shall promote the circu- 
lation of World Outlook throughout the conference. She shall report annually to the 
conference Society and to the jurisdiction secretary of Literature and Publications in 
accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall 
be a member of the conference Committee on Schools of Missions and Christian Service. 

Section 14- The secretary of Supply Work shall promote interest in the sending 
of needed supplies to institutions under the supervision of the Woman's Division in 
the home and foreign fields. She shall report annually to the conference Societv and to 
the jurisdiction secretary of Supply Work in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service. 

Section 15. The secretary of Status of Women shall promote the program and 
the use of any special materials on Status of Women as recommended by the Woman'9 



Bylaws — Conference Woman's Society 271 

Division. Such a program shall relate to the status of women in the life and work 
of the Church with special emphasis on The Methodist Church, and to the oppor- 
tunities open to women for service in community and nation either by election or 
appointment. 

She shall serve as chairman of the conference Committee on Status of Women, 
receive reports from the district secretaries of Status of Women, and report to the 
jurisdiction secretary of Status of Women, in accordance with the pattern of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall report annually to the conference 
Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

Section 16. The secretary of Missionary Personnel shall promote within the con- 
ference the work of recruiting and counseling prospective candidates for missionary 
and deaconess service in consultation with the secretaries of Missionary Personnel of 
the Board of Missions. She shall be responsible for giving information to district and 
local groups concerning the need for workers, requirements for missionary and dea- 
coness service, available scholarship aids, literature on missionary personnel and educa- 
tional institutions preferred for study. She shall be a member of the annual conference 
Commission on Christian Vocations. She shall report annually to the conference 
Woman's Society of Christian Service and to the secretary of Missionary Personnel of 
the jurisdiction Woman's Society of Christian Service in accordance with the pattern 
of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

In conferences where the secretaries of Youth Work, of Student Work, or of the 
Wesleyan Service Guild of the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service are 
not coopted on the annual conference Commission on Christian Vocations, the secre- 
tary of Missionary Personnel of the conference Woman's Society shall, in addition to 
transmitting information through the regular channels, transmit information from the 
annual conference Commission on Christian Vocations to the secretaries of Youth 
Work, of Student Work, and of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the conference Woman's 
Society of Christian Service, and vice versa. 

Article II. — Elections 

Section 1. Only women residing within the bounds of the conference, or who are 
actively participating members of churches within the bounds of the conference, shall 
be elected as conference officers. Conference officers shall be elected at an annual 
meeting of the Society, the method to be determined by the conference Society. The 
elections shall take place annually, biennially, or quadrennially, as the conference 
may determine. The treasurer of the conference shall hold office not to exceed eight 
years. 

Section 2. Conference officers shall take office at the close of the meeting in which 
they are elected, unless elected within two months of the close of the fiscal year, when, 
if desired, they may take office June 1. 

Section 3. At the annual meeting of the conference Society preceding the last 
annual meeting of the jurisdiction Woman's Society of the quadrennium, the con- 
ference Society shall elect six delegates to the jurisdiction Society, three of whom 
shall be conference officers. 

At this same meeting, the conference Society shall nominate three women for 
membership on the Board of Missions and forward the names at once to the juris- 
diction Woman's Society. 

Section 4- At the annual meeting of the conference Society preceding the Assem- 
bly, delegates to the Assembly shall be elected in accordance with the stated member- 
ship of the Assembly. (See bylaws for the Assembly, Article III, Section 1.) 

Article III. — Funds 

Section 1. The conference Society shall make an annual pledge to the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service. 

Section 2. All undirected missionary gifts shall be divided in the office of the 
treasurer of the Woman's Division on a basis agreed upon by the Division. There 
shall be no division of missionary funds by the conference treasurer. 

Sections. Gifts for missionary projects.* clearly specified, shall be sent to the 
conference treasurer, who shall transmit them to the treasurer of the Woman's 
Division through the regular channels. 

* See footnote page 242. 



272 

Section 4- Funds contributed for Special Membership and Memorials are a part 
of regular pledges on appropriations and may not be directed by the conference Society. 

Section 5. Each conference Society shall set up a fund for conference cultivation 
and expenses and for such jurisdiction cultivation and expenses as are not provided 
for by the Woman's Division. 

Section 6. The Week of Prayer and Self-Denial Offering shall be sent to the 
treasurer of the Woman's Division to be applied to the objects designated each year 
by the Woman's Division. 

Article IV. — Executive Committee 

Section 1. The executive committee of the conference Society shall be composed 
of its officers, all members of the Woman's Division of Christian Service and the officers 
of the jurisdiction Society residing within the conference, and such other persons spe- 
cifically related to the work of the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service as 
the conference Society may determine. A majority shall constitute a quorum. The 
Division shall provide the expense for the attendance of Division members for one 
executive meeting annually of their conference Society. 

The executive committee of the conference shall be the coordinating group for 
the total educational and promotional program in the conference, and shall determine 
the officer for publicity in the press. 

Section 2. The executive committee shall constitute from its membership an 
administrative committee of seven who shall transact necessary business in the interim 
between meetings of the executive committee. 

Article V. — Standing Committees 

Section 1. The conference Society shall provide such standing committees as the 
needs may require. 

Section 2. There shall be a standing Committee on Spiritual Life whose endeavor 
shall be to quicken the spiritual life of all Methodist women by helping them to deepen 
their prayer life and to increase their sense of responsibility for personal service and 
giving. The committee shall keep in touch with the spiritual movements of the times 
and by prayerful research develop a clearer appreciation of the meaning of Christian 
living; it shall promote Christian stewardship, special studies, and the use of the 
Bible and other devotional materials. The committee shall devise definite means for 
permeating the local church with a spiritual power that should lead to deeper con- 
secration and to more active service. 

Section 3. There shall be a Committee on Christian Social Relations which shall 
include district secretaries of Christian Social Relations, one or more representatives of 
the Wesleyan Service Guild, nominated by the standing Committee of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild in the conference, department members living in the conference, and 
special resource people coopted as needed. This committee shall make recommendations 
to the conference Society concerning the work of Christian Social Relations in accord 
with the lines of work outlined by the Division and jurisdiction. 

Section 4- There shall be a Committee on Schools of Missions and Christian 
Service with a chairman elected annually by the committee. 

This Committee on Schools of Missions and Christian Service shall be composed 
of the secretaries of Missionary Education, Christian Social Relations, Spiritual Life, 
Promotion, Wesleyan Service Guild, Literature and Publications, the vice-president and 
such other members as may be authorized by the executive committee. In any confer- 
ence where there is a summer school for girls, the secretary of Youth Work shall be 
a member of this committee. 

The responsibility for formulating and effecting the plans of the committee shall 
be delegated to the person or persons charged by the bylaws with that particular phase 
of the education and cultivation program. 

This committee shall plan and promote a conference School of Missions and Chris- 
tian Service which shall give emphasis to the world mission of the Christian Church 
through an integrated program of missionary education, Christian social relations, 
spiritual life cultivation and program building, and which shall train leadership for the 
promotion of the total program of the Woman's Society of Christian Service. 



Bylaws — Conference Wesleyan Service Guild 273 

Section 5. There shall be a standing Committee on Study and Action, composed 
of the secretaries of Missionary Education and Service, of Christian Social Relations, 
and of Spiritual Life and a representative of the Wesleyan Service Guild. This com- 
mittee may coopt such other members as may be needed. The chairman of this 
committee shall be elected annually by the committee. 

It shall be the duty of this committee to make recommendations concerning the 
use of approved study courses, joint study courses, and cooperative courses. It may 
recommend also other studies in line with major needs. This committee shall develop 
a correlated program of education and action for the year which shall include sem- 
inars, workshops, retreats, and any other educational activities, and shall make recom- 
mendations concerning the same to the conference Society. 

Section 6. There shall be a standing Committee on Finance. This committee 
shall be composed of the treasurer of the conference, as chairman, the president, the 
secretary of Promotion, the secretary or secretaries of Missionary Education and Service, 
the secretary of Christian Social Relations, the secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild, 
the treasurers of the districts and a limited number of other women appointed at the 
annual meeting of the conference Society. 

This committee shall meet at least semiannually, and on call of the chairman. 

It shall study the strength of the Societies in the local churches and the pledges 
made; become informed of conference income and disbursements, local financial pos- 
sibilities and problems; and assist by counsel in the forming of the conference pledge 
and budget. 

Section 7. There shall be a standing Committee on Status of Women. It shall 
be the duty of this committee to study the status of women in the local church, the 
community, the state, the nation, and in other lands. This study shall include the 
bases of woman's place and the questions that affect her place in society and in the 
church. The committee shall make recommendations to the conference Society for 
the promotion of such lines of activities as will improve the status of woman and enable 
her to serve effectively. 

Section 8. There shall be a Committee on Annual Meeting Program, composed 
of the president, the vice-president, the recording secretary, and such other members 
as may be needed. The committee shall elect its chairman annually. 

Article VI. — Bylaws 

The conference Society may make such bylaws as the needs of the conference 
require, provided they are in harmony with the constitution and bylaws of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Article VII. — Amendments 

Amendments to these bylaws may be made by majority vote at any annual 
meeting of the Woman's Division, provided a thirty days' notice is given in writing 
to all members of the Division by the Executive Committee of the Division or by the 
standing Committee on Constitution and Bylaws of the Division. 

Bylaws of the Conference Wesleyan Service Guild 

Article I. — Name 

Within the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service there shall be for 
employed women a conference Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Article II. — Purpose 

The purpose of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild shall be to plan and direct 
the work of the Wesleyan Service Guild within the conference in accordance with the 
constitution and bylaws of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Article III. — Membership 

Representatives from the Wesleyan Service Guilds in the districts, the number 
to be determined by the conference Wesleyan Service Guild according to its require- 
ments, such district officers of the Wesleyan Service Guild as the conference Wesleyan 
Service Guild may determine, members of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild 
standing committee, and members of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service 



274 

Guild of the Woman's Division of Christian Service residing within the conference 
shall be members of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Article IV. — Officers and Their Duties 

Section 1. There shall be a secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild who shall be 
the presiding officer of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild. There also shall be a 
recording secretary. 

Section 2. These officers shall be elected from the membership of the Wesleyan 
Service Guilds within the conference. 

Section S. (1) The secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall preside at the 
meetings of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild and serve as chairman of the standing 
committee of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild. She shall promote the work 
of the Wesleyan Service Guild within the conference; she will receive reports from 
district secretaries of the Wesleyan Service Guild; she shall report annually to the 
Woman's Society of Christian Service of the conference and to the jurisdiction secretary 
of the Wesleyan Service Guild, and the secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild 
of the Woman's Division of Christian Service in accordance with the pattern of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall be responsible for planning of meetings 
of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild; she shall represent the Wesleyan Service 
Guild and present its interests at the meetings of the conference Woman's Society of 
Christian Service of which she shall be an officer. She shall attend, as far as possible, 
district meetings of the Wesleyan Service Guild and shall be a member of the executive 
committee of the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service. She shall present 
a budget to the Committee on Finance of the conference Woman's Society of Christian 
Service. 

(2) The recording secretary shall keep the minutes of the conference meetings 
and perform such other duties as may be authorized by the conference Wesleyan 
Service Guild. 

Article V. — Meetings 

There shall be an annual meeting of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild where 
reports shall be received and necessary business transacted. This meeting may be 
combined with a Guild Weekend at which time there may be a program of inspiration. 

Article VI. — Committees and Their Duties 

Section 1. There shall be a standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild 
of the conference composed of the secretary of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild, 
the recording secretary, the district secretaries of the Wesleyan Service Guild, the 
secretary of Promotion of the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service, the 
treasurer of the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service, and two other 
representatives of the Woman's Society of Christian Service to be elected by the con- 
ference Wesleyan Service Guild, these two members to be optional in conferences 
where there are less than six districts. Such additional members as the work demands 
may be coopted. 

Section 2. The standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the con- 
ference shall assist in the planning of the work of the Wesleyan Service Guild within the 
conference. The committee may set up subcommittees to carry on the work of Spiritual 
Life, Missionary Education and Service, Christian Social Relations, Status of Women, 
Supply Work, and Literature and Publications, the chairmen of which shall be members 
of the standing committee. 

Section S. There shall be a Committee on Nominations composed of three to 
seven members, whose duty shall be to present nominations of all officers. 

Article VII. — Elections 

Section. 1. The officers of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild, the two repre- 
sentatives of the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service to serve on the 
standing Committee of the Guild, and the Committee on Nominations shall be elected 
at a meeting of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild. The term of office and the 
time of assuming office shall conform to that prevailing in the conference Woman's 
Society of Christian Service. 



Bylaws — Conference Deaconess Board 275 

Section 2. Vacancies occurring ad interim shall be filled for the remainder of the 
term involved by the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the 
conference. 

Section 8. The election of the conference secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild 
shall be confirmed by the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

Article VIII. — Amendments 

Proposed amendments to these bylaws may be made on the recommendation of 
the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the Woman's Division to 
the Division by a majority vote, at any annual meeting of the Division, provided a 
thirty days' notice is given in writing to all members of the Division by the Executive 
Committee of the Division or by the standing Committee on Constitution and Bylaws 
of the Division. 

Proposed amendments to bylaws of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall be sent to the 
standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the Woman's Division in time for 
recommendation to the September meeting of the Executive Committee of the Division. 

Bylaws of the Annual Conference Deaconess Board 

Article I. — Members 

Section 1. The membership of the annual conference Deaconess Board shall 
follow the pattern described in the 1956 Discipline, Par. 1254, Sec. 3. 

Section 2. A deaconess on leave of absence for a year or more shall transfer her 
church membership to the conference where she resides while on leave. 

Section 3. A deaconess serving in a connectional office of the church shall be a 
member of the annual conference Deaconess Board of the conference where she 
holds her church membership. 

Article II. — Officers 

Section 1. The officers of the annual conference Deaconess Board shall be a 
president, a vice-president, a recording secretary, and a treasurer, nominated by the 
committee on nominations with the privilege of nominations from the floor and elected 
annually by ballot. They may serve for not more than four successive years. 

Article III. — Duties of Officers 

Section 1. The president shall preside at all meetings of the board and of the 
executive committee and perform all duties that ordinarily pertain to the office of 
president. 

Section 2. The vice-president shall serve in the absence of the president and shall 
serve as chairman of the program committee. 

Section 3. The recording secretary shall perform the customary duties of the 
office, and shall prepare the annual report and approved list of appointments to be 
printed in the journal of the annual conference. This secretary shall provide the 
secretary of the annual conference with a list of deaconesses eligible for seating at 
the sessions of the annual conference and written excuses for the absence of those 
who are unable to attend, and shall make annual narrative and statistical reports to the 
Commission on Deaconess Work and to the jurisdiction Deaconess Association. 

Section 4- The treasurer shall keep all funds of the board, disburse them on the 
order of the president, and shall give an annual report of all receipts and disburse- 
ments to the annual conference Deaconess Board. 

Article IV. — Meetings 

Section 1. Special meetings may be called by the president in consultation with 
the executive committee. 

Section 2. Notification of any meeting shall be given at least two weeks prior 
to the date of the meeting, and a majority of the members present shall constitute 
a quorum. 



276 

Article V. — Committees 

Section 1. There shall be the following committees of the board: an executive 
committee, a committee on program, a committee on nominations, and such other 
committees as are necessary. 

Section 2. The executive committee shall consist of the officers and at least three 
other members with due respect to representation from the various groups involved. 
This committee shall act for the board ad interim and shall meet on call of the president. 

Section S. The committee on program shall arrange the programs of the board. 

Section 4- The committee on nominations shall submit nominations for all officers, 
additional members of the executive committee, and members of standing committees. 

Article VI. — Finance 

Section 1. The annual conference Deaconess Board shall make provision for 
financing the work of the board. 

Article VII. — Bylaws and Amendments 

Section 1. Amendments to these bylaws shall be submitted by a majority vote 
of the commission to the Woman's Division of Christian Service at any annual meet- 
ing of the Division, provided thirty days' notice is given in writing to all members of the 
Division by the Executive Committee of the Division or by the standing Committee on 
Constitution and Bylaws of the Division. Such changes must be in the hands of the 
Executive Committee of the Woman's Division by the September meeting. 

Section 2. Additional bylaws as are needed may be made by the annual con- 
ference Deaconess Board, provided they are in harmony with the constitution and 
bylaws of the annual conference Deaconess Board prescribed by the Commission on 
Deaconess Work. 

Section 8. Such bylaws may be amended by a two-thirds vote at any annual 
meeting of the board, provided copies of the amendment have been circulated among 
the members not later than thirty days before the meeting. 

Bylaws of the 
District Woman's Society of Christian Service 

Article I. — Officers 

Section 1. The president shall preside at all meetings of the district Woman's 
Society of Christian Service and actively advance all the interests of the work. She 
shall sign all orders on the treasury. She shall be a member ex officio of all com- 
mittees. She shall perform such other duties as are usual to a presiding officer. She 
shall be a member of the conference executive committee. She shall present the work 
at district conferences and institutes as called for by the district superintendent. 

Section 2. The vice-president shall perform the duties of the president in her 
absence and actively assist in promoting the interests of the Society. She shall be 
responsible for assisting in promoting the plans and methods for use and development 
of the monthly program materials as related to the duties of the Committee on Program 
in the local Society. She shall cooperate as directed by the vice-president of the 
conference in presenting information on the World Federation of Methodist Women. 
She shall perform such other duties as the district Society may require. 

She shall receive reports from the vice-presidents of the Woman's Societies of 
Christian Service in the local chuch and shall report to the vice-president of the 
conference Woman's Society in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service. 

Section S. The recording secretary shall give notice of all meetings of the district 
Society and of the executive committee. She shall keep a record of all the district 
meetings in permanent form and send a copy of the minutes of the executive com- 
mittee meetings to each officer. She shall present all recommendations of the execu- 
tive committee to the district Society and notify all committees of their appointment. 



Bylaws — District Woman's Society 277 

Section 4- The treasurer shall receive the Division funds of the Woman's Society 
of Christian Service in the local church monthly or quarterly, from the treasurer of 
the local Society, provided the conference Society so orders. She shall remit such 
funds to the treasurer of the conference Society. She shall report annually to the 
district Society. She shall disburse district funds upon the written order of the 
district president and the secretary of Promotion, and shall send an itemized statement 
of all finances to these officers. Her books shall be audited annually by a certified 
public accountant and the auditor's report presented to the district Society. She shall 
be a member of the district standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Section 5. The secretary of Promotion shall conduct correspondence with the So- 
cieties of the district and keep in close touch with the conference secretary of Promo- 
tion. She shall furnish such information to the Societies as is needed for the promotion 
of their work. She shall organize and cultivate new Societies. She shall have special 
responsibility for district members. She shall make reports to the district Society and 
to the conference Society, as required. She shall send reports to the conference secretary 
of Promotion in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian 
Service. She shall send a list of district officers to the conference secretary of Promotion. 
She shall sign, with the president, all orders on the treasury. She shall be a member of 
the district standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Section 6. The secretary of Missionary Education and Service shall be responsible 
for missionary education in the district and for the promotion of study courses in 
the Societies, under the leadership of the conference secretary of Missionary Education 
and Service. She shall secure the cooperation of the secretaries of Spiritual Life and 
of Christian Social Relations in coordinating the study and action plans for the district. 
She shall report annually to the district Society, and to the conference secretary of 
Missionary Education and Service in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service. 

Section 7. The secretaiy of Christian Social Relations shall develop and direct the 
work of the district, under the leadership of the conference secretary of Christian Social 
Relations. She shall guide the women in the studies and action growing out of the 
program emphases of the Department of Christian Social Relations. She shall co- 
operate with the secretary of Spiritual Life and with the secretary of Missionary 
Education and Service in the study and action plans of the district. She shall co- 
operate with other organizations of the church and with other agencies working toward 
similar ends. She shall report annually to the district Society, and to the conference 
secretary of Christian Social Relations in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service. 

Section 8. The secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall preside at the meet- 
ings of the district Wesleyan Service Guild and serve as chairman of the standing 
committee of the district Wesleyan Service Guild. She shall promote the work of 
the Wesleyan Service Guild within the district; she shall receive reports from the 
secretaries of Promotion of the units of the Wesleyan Service Guild in the local church ; 
she shall report annually to the Woman's Society of Christian Service of the district 
and to the secretary of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild in accordance with the 
pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall have responsi- 
bility for district members of the Wesleyan Service Guild. She shall be respon- 
sible for planning of meetings of the district Wesleyan Service Guild; she shall represent 
the Wesleyan Service Guild and present its interests at the meetings of the district 
Woman's Society of Christian Service, of which she shall be an officer. She shall 
attend as far as possible unit meetings of the Wesleyan Service Guild and shall be a 
member of the executive committee of the district Woman's Society of Christian 
Service. She shall present a budget to the committee of the district Woman's Society 
of Christian Service caring for the finances of the district. 

Section 9. The secretary of Student Work shall promote the plans and programs 
approved by the Woman's Division, under the leadership of the conference secretary 
of Student Work. She shall report to the district Society, and to the conference secre- 
tary of Student Work in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of 
Christian Service. 

Section 10. The secretary of Youth Work shall promote the work according to 
the plans and program approved by the Woman's Division, under the leadership of the 
conference secretary of Youth Work. She shall work in cooperation with the secretary 



278 

of Missionary Personnel in channeling information and material to the local church. 
She shall report annually to the district Society. She shall receive reports from the 
local secretaries of Youth Work and report to the conference secretary of Youth Work 
in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She 
shall be elected by the Woman's Society of Christian Service after consultation by the 
Committee on Nominations with the district council of the Methodist Youth Fellow- 
ship relative to a nominee for the office. 

Section 11. The secretary of Children's Work shall promote the work according 
to the plans and program approved by the Woman's Division, under the leadership of 
the conference secretary of Children's Work. She shall report annually to the district 
Society, and to the conference secretary of Children's Work in accordance with the 
pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Section 12. The secretary of Spiritual Life shall endeavor to quicken the spiritual 
life of Methodist women and shall seek to permeate the church with spiritual power 
which should lead to deeper consecration and more effective Christian service. She 
shall cooperate with the secretaries of Missionary Education and Service and of Chris- 
tian Social Relations in coordinating the study and action plans of the district. She 
shall report annually to the district Societj - , and to the conference secretary of Spiritual 
Life in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Section 13. The secretary of Literature and Publications shall be responsible for 
the distribution of literature throughout the district. She shall make a careful study 
of all literature and program materials of the Woman's Division and report concerning 
its suitability to meet the needs of the Societies in the district. She shall promote the 
circulation and use of The Methodist Woman and World Outlook throughout the dis- 
trict. She shall report annually to the district Society and to the conference secretary of 
Literature and Publications in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division 
of Christian Service. 

Section 14- The secretary of Supply Work shall be responsible for promoting 
interest in the sending of needed supplies to institutions under the supervision of the 
Woman's Division in home and foreign fields. She shall report annually to the district 
Society and to the conference secretary of Supply Work in accordance with the pattern 
of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Section 15. The secretary of Status of Women shall promote the program and 
plans on Status of Women as recommended by the conference Society. Such a pro- 
gram shall relate to the status of women in the life and work of the Church with 
special emphasis on The Methodist Church and to the opportunities open to women 
for service in community and nation either by election or appointment. 

She shall receive reports from the secretaries of Status of Women of the local 
Woman's Socities and report, in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of 
Christian Service, to the secretary of Status of Women of the conference Society and 
annually to the district Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

Section 16. The secretary of Missionary Personnel shall create an awareness of 
personnel needs, counsel youth, channel names of prospective candidates to the con- 
ference secretary. She shall work in cooperation with the secretary of Youth Work 
in channeling information and material to the local church. She shall report to the 
conference secretary of Missionary Personnel in accordance with the pattern of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Article II. — Elections 

Section 1. Only women residing within the bounds of the district, or who are 
actively participating members of churches within the bounds of the district, shall be 
elected as district officers. The district Woman's Society of Christian Service shall de- 
termine the method of election of its officers. The treasurer of the district shall hold 
office not to exceed eight years. 

Section 2. District officers shall take office at the close of the meeting in which 
they are elected, unless elected within two months of the close of the fiscal year, when, if 
desired, they may take office June 1. 

Section 3. At the annual meeting preceding the Assembly, a delegate shall be 
elected to the Assembly. 



Bylaws — District Wesleyan Service Guild 279 

Article III. — Cultivation Fund 

Each district shall set up a fund for district cultivation and expenses, according 
to its needs. 

Article IV. — Standing Committees 

Section 1. The district Society shall provide such standing committees as the needs 
may require, under the guidance of the conference Society. 

Section 2. The executive committee of the district shall be composed of the 
officers of the district and chairmen of such standing committees as may be set up. The 
executive committee shall meet prior to the meeting of the district Society, shall con- 
sider the advance plans projected by the conference Society, and make recommenda- 
tions to the district Society for carrying forward these plans. Vacancies occurring 
ad interim in offices of the Society or chairmen of committees shall be filled by the 
executive committee. 

The executive committee shall determine the officer to be responsible for publicity 
in the press. 

Section 8. There shall be a Committee on Annual Meeting Program, composed 
of the president, the vice-president, the recording secretary, and such other members 
as may be needed. The committee shall elect its chairman annually. 

Article V. — Bylaws 

The district Society may make such bylaws as the needs of the district require, 
provided they are in harmony with the constitution and bylaws of the conference 
Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

Article VI. — Amendments 

Amendments to these bylaws may be made by majority vote at any annual 
meeting of the Woman's Division, provided a thirty days' notice is given in writing 
to all members of the Division by the Executive Committee of the Division or by the 
standing Committee on Constitution and Bjdaws of the Division. 

Bylaws of the District Wesleyan Service Guild 

Article I. — Name 

Within the district Woman's Society of Christian Service there shall be for em- 
ployed women a district Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Article II. —Purpose 

The purpose of the district Wesleyan Service Guild shall be to plan and direct 
the work of the Wesleyan Service Guild within the district in accordance with the 
constitution and bylaws of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Article III. — Membership 

Representatives from the Wesleyan Service Guild units in the local church, the 
number to be determined by the district Wesleyan Service Guild according to its 
requirements, such unit officers of the Wesleyan Service Guild as the district Wesleyan 
Service Guild may determine, members of the district Wesleyan Service Guild standing 
committee, and members of the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild 
of the Woman's Division of Christian Service residing within the district shall be 
members of the district Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Article IV. — Officers and Their Duties 

Section 1. There shall be a secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild who shall 
be the presiding officer of the district Wesleyan Service Guild. There also shall be a 
recording secretary. 

Section 2. These officers shall be elected from the membership of the Wesleyan 
Service Guilds within the district. 

Section 3. (1) The secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall preside at the 
meetings of the district Wesleyan Service Guild and serve as chairman of the standing 
committee of the district Wesleyan Service Guild. She shall promote the work of 
the Wesleyan Service Guild within the district; she shall receive reports from the 



280 

secretaries of Promotion of the units of the Wesleyan Service Guild in the local church ; 
she shall report annually to the Woman's Society of Christian Service of the district 
and the secretary of the conference Wesleyan Service Guild in accordance with 
the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall have respon- 
sibility for district members of the Wesleyan Service Guild. She shall be responsible 
for planning of meetings of the district Wesleyan Service Guild; she shall represent 
the Wesleyan Service Guild and present its interests at the meetings of the district 
Woman's Society of Christian Service, of which she shall be an officer. She shall attend, 
as far as possible, unit meetings of the Wesleyan Service Guild and shall be a member 
of the executive committee of the district Woman's Society of Christian Service. 
She shall present a budget to the Committee on Finance of the district Woman's Society 
of Christian Service. 

(2) The recording secretary shall keep the minutes of the district meetings and 
perform such other duties as may be authorized by the district Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Article V. — Meetings 

There shall be an annual meeting of the district Wesleyan Service Guild where 
reports shall be received and necessary business transacted. This meeting may be 
combined with a Guild Weekend at which time there may be a program of inspiration. 

Article VI. — Committees and Their Duties 

Section 1. There shall be a standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild 
of the district composed of the secretary of the district Wesleyan Service Guild, the 
recording secretary, the unit presidents of the Wesleyan Service Guild, the secretary of 
Promotion of the district Woman's Society of Christian Service, the treasurer of the 
district Woman's Society of Christian Service, and two other representatives of the 
Woman's Society of Christian Service to be elected by the district Wesleyan Service 
Guild, these two members to be optional in districts where there are less than six units 
of the Wesleyan Service Guild. Such additional members as the work demands may 
be coopted. 

Section 2. The standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the dis- 
trict shall assist in the planning of the work of the Wesleyan Service Guild within the 
district. The committee may set up subcommittees to carry on the work of Spiritual 
Life, Missionary Education and Service, Christian Social Relations, Status of Women, 
Supply Work, and Literature and Publications, the chairmen of which shall be members 
of the standing committee. 

Section S. There shall be a Committee on Nominations composed of three to 
seven members, whose duty shall be to present nominations of all officers. 

Article VII. — Elections 

Section 1. The officers of the district Wesleyan Service Guild, the two representa- 
tives of the district Woman's Society of Christian Service to serve on the standing 
Committee of the Guild, and the Committee on Nominations shall be elected at a 
meeting of the district Wesleyan Service Guild. The term of office and the time of 
assuming office shall conform to that prevailing in the district Woman's Society of 
Christian Service. 

Section 2. Vacancies occurring ad interim shall be filled for the remainder of the 
term involved by the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the district. 

Section 8. The election of the district secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall 
be confirmed by the district Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

Article VIII. — Amendments 

Proposed amendments to these bylaws may be made, on the recommendation of 
the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the Woman's Division to 
the Division by a majority vote, at any annual meeting of the Division, provided a 
thirty days' notice is given in writing to all members of the Division by the Executive 
Committee of the Division or by the standing Committee on Constitution and Bylaws 
of the Division. 

Proposed amendments to bylaws of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall be sent to 
the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the Woman's Division in 
time for recommendation to the September meeting of the Executive Committee of 
the Division. 



281 



Bylaws of the 

Woman's Society of Christian Service 

in the Local Church 

Article I. — Meetings 

Section 1. There shall be one or more regular meetings of the Woman's Society 
of Christian Service during a month. There shall be an annual meeting for the re- 
ceiving of annual reports and the election and installation of officers. It shall be held 
prior to the close of the fiscal year. Adequate time shall be given in the meeting for 
education in and successful promotion of the vast interests committed to Methodist 
women. The first regular meeting of the year shall be devoted to consecration and 
the consideration of the plans, programs, and financial pledges for the year. Where 
expedient, the Society may organize circles, representing the entire program of the 
Society. Circles, if organized, shall meet once a month as the whole Society for an 
inclusive presentation of the plans and program of the Society. Membership in circles 
shall be revolving, subject to entire change of personnel (annually or biennially) at the 
time of the annual meeting. 

Section 2. The order of business shall include worship ; reports of general officers, 
of officers in charge of the various lines of work, and of chairmen of standing commit- 
tees; and a program presenting the total work of the Society as provided by the edu- 
cation and cultivation agencies of the Division. 

Section 3. A special meeting of the Society may be called by the president with 
the approval of the executive committee. At such special meetings no business shall 
be transacted except that for which the meeting is called. 

Section 4- The president may call a special meeting of the executive committee 
to consider business of importance. 

Article II. — Nominations and Elections 

Section 1. The Society shall elect, at the time all officers are elected, from three to 
seven members who shall serve as a Committee on Nominations to present nominations 
of all officers and chairmen of standing committees for the ensuing term. 

The Committee on Nominations shall consult with the council of the Methodist 
Youth Fellowship and the council of children's workers in the church school before 
making nominations for the secretaries of Youth Work and of Children's Work. 

In nominating a representative on the Committee on Christian Vocations of the 
church, the Society shall take into consideration the secretary of Youth Work or the 
secretary of Student Work. 

Section 2. Nominations and elections may be by acclamation or by ballot. The 
consent of nominees shall be secured before presenting names. 

Section 3. A majority vote is sufficient for election. Those elected shall assume 
their duties at the beginning of the fiscal year. 

Section 4- No officers shall hold the same office for more than four consecutive 
years with the possible exception of the treasurer, who may serve eight years. 

Article III. — Duties of Officers 

Section 1. The president shall preside at all meetings of the Society and of the 
executive committee. She shall actively advance all phases of the work of the Society. 
She shall promote close cooperation between the Society and the Commission on Missions 
in the local church. She shall officially represent the Society at all meetings except 
where delegates are elected by the Society. She shall be a member ex officio of all 
committees except the Committee on Nominations and shall sign all orders on the 
treasury. She shall be a member of The Methodist Church, and thus qualify as an 
ex officio steward for membership on the official board and of the quarterly con- 
ference. She shall be a member of the adult division council of the local church school. 

Section 2. The vice-president shall assist in promoting the interests of the Society 
and in the absence of the president shall assume the duties of that office. She shail 
be the chairman of the Committee on Program and have special responsibility for pro- 
moting the use of the monthly program materials. She shall be responsible for 



282 

presenting information on the World Federation of Methodist Women as directed 
by the vice-president of the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service. She 
shall report to the vice-president of the district Woman's Society, in accordance with 
the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Section 3. The recording secretary shall keep the minutes of all meetings of the 
Society and of the executive committee and shall sign, with the president, all official 
papers. She shall report the recommendations of the executive committee to the 
Society, and in cooperation with the Committee on Publicity see that all meetings are 
properly announced. She shall be custodian of all official papers and records. She 
shall conduct the correspondence of the Society not otherwise cared for. 

Section 4- The treasurer of the Woman's Society of Christian Service shall send 
all funds, except those designated for local church and community activities, to the 
conference Society treasurer, unless the conference authorizes district treasurers to 
receive such funds. She shall make itemized monthly and annual reports to the 
Society. She shall accept funds turned over to her by the local unit of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild and send them to the district or conference treasurer, clearly marked as 
Wesleyan Service Guild funds. She shall remit monthly or quarterly to the district or 
conference treasurer. She shall send to the conference treasurer an annual, itemized 
statement of all missionary and local funds passed by the auditing committee of the 
local church. 

Section 5. The secretary of Promotion shall assist the president in advancing all 
phases of the work of the Society. She shall interpret to the Society the goals set by 
the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall distribute the report blanks to 
the secretaries of lines of work in the local Society, and file duplicate copies for perma- 
nent record. She shall send reports to the district secretary of Promotion, in accordance 
with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall send a list 
of newly elected officers of the Society to the district secretary of Promotion immedi- 
ately following the election at the annual meeting of the Society. She shall encourage 
cooperation in and support of the total program of the local church. She shall be a 
member of the Committees on Local Church Activities, Membership, and Finance. 

Section 6. The secretary of Missionary Education and Service shall promote 
study groups, provide missionary information, keep in touch with connectional agen- 
cies and missionaries and deaconesses, make recommendations for missionary projects* 
and seek to develop the interest of the membership in their support. As a member 
of the Committee on Program she shall work with the committee in formulating the 
study plans of the Society. She shall make reports of the work to the Society and shall 
send reports to the corresponding district or conference officer in accordance with the 
pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall be a member of the 
Committee on Finance. 

Section 7. The secretary of Christian Social Relations shall promote the work of 
the Society in community service, guide special studies on community and world con- 
ditions, recommend to the local Society studies and action relating to social issues, and 
plan and supervise service activities approved by the Society in accord with the policy 
of the Woman's Division. She shall cooperate with other agencies of the local church 
having similar purpose, seeking to increase the total effectiveness of the local church in 
its social outreach. The secretary shall be chairman of the Committee on Christian 
Social Relations and a member of the Committee on Program of the Society. She shall 
be a member of the Committee on Finance. She shall make reports of the work to the 
Society and shall send reports to the corresponding district or conference officer in 
accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Section 8. The secretary of Student Work shall promote the plans and program 
approved by the Woman's Division of Christian Service. Her responsibility shall be 
for all college students of her church whether at home or away from home. 

The secretary of Student Work in the church nearest the campus shall assist in 
the program of student religious life. She shall work in cooperation with the pastor- 
director of Student Work or with the director of religious life on the campus. She 
shall be a member of the Campus Church Relations Committee of the local church. 
She shall cooperate especially with the local student council commission on the World 
Christian Community. She shall interest the Woman's Society in offering Christian 
hospitality to students from other lands. She shall make reports of the Student Work 
to the Woman's Society and shall send reports to the district or conference secretary 

* See footnote page 242. 



Bylaws of the Woman's Society 283 

of Student Work in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian 
Service. 

Section 9. The secretary of Youth Work shall cooperate in the total program 
of missionary education in the local church in harmony with the plans and program 
of the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service and of the Woman's Division. 
She shall make reports of the Youth Work to the Society and shall send reports to 
the corresponding district or conference officer in accordance with the pattern of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall be a member of the youth division 
council of the local church school. She shall be elected by the Woman's Society of 
Christian Service after consultation by the Committee on Nominations with the council 
of the Methodist Youth Fellowship in the church relative to a nominee for the office. 

Section 10. The secretary of Children's Work shall cooperate in the total program 
of missionary education in the local church in harmony with the plans and program 
of the conference Woman's Society of Christian Service and of the Woman's Division. 
She shall make reports of the Children's Work to the Society and shall send reports 
to the corresponding district or conference officer in accordance with the pattern of 
the Woman's Division of Christian Service. She shall be a member of the children's 
division council of the local church school. She shall be elected by the Woman's Society 
of Christian Service after consultation by the Committee on Nominations with the 
council of children's workers in the church school relative to a nominee for the office. 

Section 11. The secretary of Spiritual Life shall seek to quicken the spiritual 
life of all the women of the church and to increase their sense of responsibility for 
personal service and giving. She shall serve as chairman of the Committee on Spiritual 
Life and shall be a member of the Committee on Program of the Society. She shall 
be a member ex officio of the Commission on Membership and Evangelism in the 
local church. She shall make reports of the work to the Society and shall send reports 
to the corresponding district or conference officer in accordance with the pattern of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Section 12. The secretary of Literature and Publications shall be a member of 
the Committee on Program and shall make a careful study of all literature, including the 
program materials of the Woman's Division and shall report to the conference secre- 
tary of Literature and Publications concerning their use by the local Society and their 
suitability to its needs. She shall also be responsible for the circulation of World 
Outlook and The Methodist Woman through the local church. She shall, in coopera- 
tion with some person appointed by the Commission on Missions in the local church, 
and with the assistance of a joint committee, make a canvass of the entire member- 
ship, securing subscriptions and renewals. A particular responsibility shall be to 
present both of these magazines to the members of the Woman's Society of Chris- 
tian Service. She shall make reports of this work to the Society and shall send 
reports to the corresponding district or conference officer in accordance with the pattern 
of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Section 13. The secretary of Supply Work shall direct the sending of needed sup- 
plies to institutions under the supervision of the Woman's Division in the home and 
foreign fields. She shall make reports to the Society and shall send reports to the 
corresponding district or conference officer in accordance with the pattern of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Section 14- The secretary of Status of Women shall work with the local Com- 
mittee on Status of Women to implement the program in this area as recommended 
by Division, jurisdiction, and conference. She shall be a member of the Committee on 
Program. She shall report to the district or conference secretary of Status of Women 
in accordance with the pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

Section 15. The chairman of Local Church Activities shall bring recommendations 
to the Woman's Society concerning activities and needs in line with the responsibilities 
of the Woman's Society in the local church. She shall be responsible for directing 
fellowship activities authorized by the Woman's Society. As the need arises, she shall 
work with the minister and local church committees in making plans for fellowship 
activities in the local church. She shall report local church activities through the secre- 
tary of Promotion. She shall be a member of the Committees on Finance and Local 
Church Activities. 



284 

Article IV. — Standing Committees 

Section 1. The executive committee shall consist of the officers and the chairmen 
of standing committees and circles and the president and treasurer of the unit of the 
Wesleyan Service Guild in the local church. The committee shall meet once a month 
prior to the business meeting of the Society. It shall consider all plans and projects 
and submit its recommendations to the Society for action. Ad interim vacancies in 
officers or in chairmen shall be filled by the executive committee. 

Section 2. There shall be a Committee on Spiritual Life of which the secretary 
of Spiritual Life of the Woman's Society in the local church shall be the chairman. 
The committee shall be responsible for the promotion of special studies recommended 
by the standing Committee on Spiritual Life of the conference Society and of the 
Woman's Division. 

Section 3. There shall be a Committee on Christian Social Relations in the local 
Society. This committee shall meet regularly and study community, national, and 
world issues and needs of concern to the church. The committee shall bring reports 
and recommendations to the monthly meeting of the Woman's Society. Special sub- 
committees may be appointed as need arises. 

Section 4- The Committee on Program shall consist of the vice-president of the 
Society, who shall be chairman, the secretaries of Missionary Education and Service, 
of Christian Social Relations, of Literature and Publications, of Spiritual Life, and of 
Status of Women. Additional members may be elected or appointed by the executive 
committee if the Society so desires. 

This committee shall plan and supervise the programs for regular monthly and 
other meetings of the Woman's Society of Christian Service and shall consider all 
plans and make recommendations for the study and action program of the Woman's 
Society. 

Section 5. The Committee on Finance shall consist of the president, the treasurer 
who shall be chairman, the secretary of Promotion, the secretary of Missionary Educa- 
tion and Service, the secretary of Christian Social Relations, the chairman of Local 
Church Activities, and such other persons as may be desired. 

It shall be the duty of this committee to consider the total budget of the Society. 
This budget shall include the amounts to be sent to the district or conference treasurer, 
and the amounts to be expended locally. Officers and committees of the Society shall 
present all anticipated needs for funds to the Committee on Finance of the Woman's So- 
ciety of Christian Service for consideration in making the budget to be recommended to 
the Society for adoption. 

The committee shall recommend the total budget to the Society for its approval 
and adoption. 

Requests for funds not included in the budget adopted shall be referred by the 
Society to the Committee on Finance for study in relation to the total financial respon- 
sibility of the Society. Such requests shall be acted upon by the Society. 

The Committee on Finance shall bring to the Society recommendations and plans 
for securing all funds to be spent locally or channeled to the district or conference 
treasurer. 

Note: Funds for missionary projects shall be sent by the treasurer of the Woman's 
Society of Christian Service in the local church to the district or conference treasurer. 
Thank offerings, Christmas offerings, and Lenten offerings may be used as methods of 
securing the total budget of the Society in the local church. The monies, which must 
be sent to the district and /or conference treasurer for forwarding to the Division, include 
bequests and devises to local Societies from decedent estates which are designated in 
whole or in part by the donor for home and/or foreign missions. 

Section 6. The Committee on Membership shall plan frequent surveys of the 
women of the community in an endeavor to secure members for the church and for the 
Society. The committee shall strive to establish such relationship with new members as 
will enlist their eager and active participation in the total program of the church and of 
the Society. The committee shall make use of opportunities to further the interests 
of woman's work in neighboring churches where no organizations have heretofore existed. 

Section 7. The Committee on Status of Women shall make a church-wide survey 
of the leadership resources of women in the church and keep an up-to-date file of 
same for use by the Woman's Society, the Guild, or the pastor. 



Bylaws — Wesleyan Service Guild 285 

The committee shall seek to interpret the place and responsibility of women in 
the local church and work to secure a more adequate representation of women in all 
official bodies of the local church, and in the representation of the local church at the 
annual conference. 

The committee shall work to enlist well-qualified women for elective and appointive 
jobs in the community and nation. 

The committee shall study and promote the use of special materials that relate 
to the program of the Status of Women as recommended by the Woman's Division. 

Section 8. The Committee on Publicity and Printing shall send to the church bul- 
letin and newspapers all notices and reports of meetings of the Society and shall collect 
clippings and letters of interest relating to Society meetings, programs, and social 
functions. It shall have charge of printing and stationery. 

Section 9. The Committee on Local Church Activities shall be responsible for 
recommending and coordinating fellowship activities of the Woman's Society. It shall 
recommend activities and needs in line with the responsibilities of the Woman's Society 
in the local church. As the need arises, it shall work with the minister and local church 
committees in making plans for fellowship activities in the local church. It shall refer 
items related to finance to the Committee on Finance for consideration and recom- 
mendation to the Woman's Society. Membership of the Committee on Local Church 
Activities shall include the chairman of Local Church Activities, the secretary of Pro- 
motion, the treasurer, and such other members as the Woman's Society shall designate. 

Section 10. The Society shall set up such additional standing committees as the 
needs of the work from time to time shall require. 

Article V. — Amendments 

Amendments to these bylaws may be made by majority vote at any annual meeting 
of the Woman's Division, providing a thirty days' notice is given in writing to all 
members of the Division by the Executive Committee of the Division or by the standing 
Committee on Constitution and Bylaws of the Division. 



Bylaws of the Wesleyan Service Guild Unit 
in the Local Church 

Article I. — Name 

Within the local church there may be for employed women a Wesleyan Service 
Guild with one or more units auxiliary to the Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

Article II. — Purpose 

The purpose of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall be to provide a channel within 
the local church through which employed women may participate in the program of 
the Woman's Division of Christian Service, a program offering spiritual enrichment, 
Christian fellowship, and the opportunty to take an active part in developing a world 
Christian community. 

Article III. — Meetings 

Section 1. There shall be at least one regular meeting of the Wesleyan Service 
Guild in the month with at least nine monthly meetings during the year. 

Section 2. There shall be an annual meeting of the Wesleyan Service Guild prior 
to the close of the fiscal year, at which time reports shall be read and officers elected. 

Article IV. — Membership 

The Wesleyan Service Guild welcomes to its membership any employed woman 
who is in sympathy with the purpose of the Wesleyan Service Guild and who will co- 
operate in carrying out its program of education and activities. She shall become a 
member of the Wesleyan Service Guild by giving prayer, service, and a contribution to 
the annual budget. 



286 

Article V. — Officers and Their Duties 

Section 1. The officers of the unit shall be a president, a vice-president, a record- 
ing secretary, a secretary of Promotion, a treasurer and a coordinator. They shall be 
elected at the annual meeting of the unit. 

Section 2. (1) The president shall have general supervision of the work of the 
unit and shall preside at the meetings of the unit and its executive committee. She 
shall be a member of the executive committee of the Woman's Society of Christian 
Service. She shall report regularly in person to the executive committee meetings of 
the Woman's Society of Christian Service. 

(2) The vice-president shall share the responsibilities of the president and in her 
absence assume her duties. She shall be chairman of the Committee on Program. 

(3) The recording secretary shall keep a record of the proceedings of each meet- 
ing. She shall keep an accurate list of the members of the unit, including their home 
and business addresses and telephone numbers. 

(4) The secretary of Promotion shall assist the president in actively advancing 
all phases of the work of the unit. She shall assist in the organization of new units in 
nearby churches. She shall conduct such correspondence as the unit directs. She shall 
report to the unit at least quarterly and shall send reports, in accordance with the 
pattern of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, to the district or conference 
secretary of the Guild with such added information as will keep that officer informed 
regarding the unit. She shall send a list of newly elected officers and committee chair- 
men to the district and the conference secretaries of the Guild immediately following 
the annual election. 

(5) The treasurer shall have charge of all the pledges and all the monies of the 
unit. She shall collect all funds and keep a book account of all the money received and 
disbursed. She shall disburse quarterly through the treasurer of the Woman's Society 
of Christian Service in the local church (accompanying the disbursement with a re- 
mittance blank) the contribution of the unit to the work of the Woman's Division of 
Christian Service. For record in the office of the Division she shall include in quarterly 
and annual reports a record of the funds raised and disbursed by the unit for com- 
munity service and local church activities. She shall be a member of the executive 
committee of the Woman's Society of Christian Service and when unable to attend 
its meeting shall send her report. 

(6) The coordinator, who is a member of the Woman's Society of Christian 
Service, shall attend as far as possible meetings of the Wesleyan Service Guild and the 
Woman's Society of Christian Service, interpreting the one to the other. She shall 
promote the interests of the Wesleyan Service Guild in every phase of its work. 

Article VI. — Committees 

Section 1. There shall be an executive committee composed of all officers and 
committee chairmen. It shall plan the work of the local unit, and promote the interests 
of the unit in harmony with the bylaws of the Wesleyan Service Guild and the Woman's 
Division of Christian Service. 

Section 2. There shall be a Committee on Program composed of the vice-president, 
who shall be program chairman, and the chairmen of the Committees on Spiritual 
Life, Missionary Education and Service, Christian Social Relations, Status of Women, 
Supply Work, and Literature and Publications. The members of the Committee on 
Program shall work with the members of the corresponding committees in district, 
conference, and jurisdiction organizations of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Section 3. There shall be a Committee on Spiritual Life which shall endeavor by 
every means possible to promote the spiritual growth of the members and shall pro- 
vide for the devotional service of the meetings of the unit. The cultivation of Christian 
stewardship shall be one of the special functions of this committee. 

Section 4- There shall be a Committee on Missionary Education and Service, 
which shall provide for the educational program of the unit in harmony with the 
program of the Woman's Division of Christian Service as channeled through the 
standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Section 5. There shall be a Committee on Christian Social Relations, which shall 
direct the study of community relationships and social action, and promote the partici- 



Bylaws — Wesleyan Service Guild 287 

pation of Guild members in local, state, national, and world civic and welfare move- 
ments looking toward a Christian social order. 

Section 6. There shall be a Committee on Supply Work which shall direct the 
Supply Work of the unit. The chairman of the committee shall report to the treasurer 
and the secretary of Promotion of the Guild and to the secretary of Supply Work of the 
Woman's Society of Christian Service in the local church. 

Section 7. There shall be a Committee on Membership, which shall seek to retain 
the interest of the present membership, invite to unit meetings potential members 
among the employed women in the church family and in the community, and endeavor 
to enlist for the services of the church the newly employed young women. 

Section 8. There shall be a Committee on Publicity, which shall provide notices 
for the members, the church bulletin, and the church and secular press. 

Section 9. There shall be a Committee on Literature and Publications, which 
shall be responsible for securing for each committee of the Guild the program mate- 
rials, study books, handbooks, leaflets, and periodicals for carrying out the Guild pro- 
gram. It shall procure subscriptions to The Methodist Woman, World Outlook, and 
other publications, and devise ways to stimulate individual reading of these materials. 

Section 10. There shall be a Committee on Status of Women, which will study 
the status of women in local church, community, state, nation, and other lands, and 
shall promote the plans and program of the Committees on Status of Women of dis- 
trict, conference, and jurisdiction. 

Section 11. There shall be a Committee on Finance, which shall have as its 
members the president, the treasurer who shall be chairman, the secretary of Promotion, 
the chairman of Missionary Education and Service, the chairman of Christian Social 
Relations, the chairman of Local Church Activities, and such other persons as the work 
of the committee may demand. It shall be the duty of this committee to consider the 
total budget of the unit. This budget shall include the amounts to be sent to the 
treasurer of the Woman's Society of Christian Service and the amounts to be spent 
locally. The committee shall recommend the total budget to the unit for approval 
and adoption. 

Section 12. There may be a Committee on Nominations composed of from three 
to seven persons elected by the unit to present nominations of officers and chairmen 
of committees for an ensuing year. 

Section IS. Other committees may be added when needed. 

Article VII. — Funds 

Section 1. All funds from whatsoever source secured by the Wesleyan Service 
Guild unit in the local church belong to this organization and shall be disbursed only 
in accordance with its bylaws and by its order. 

Section 2. The total budget to be secured annually by the Wesleyan Service 
Guild shall include a pledge for work of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, 
funds for local church and community activities, and a cultivation fund. 

The pledge of the Wesleyan Service Guild for missions shall be determined by 
the Guild, and added to the pledge of the local Woman's Society of Christian Service 
but designated as Guild funds. 

Section 3. Funds secured for the Woman's Division of Christian Service shall be 
remitted at least quarterly, as designated on the Guild remittance blank, by the 
treasurer of the local unit of the Wesleyan Service Guild through the treasurer of the 
Woman's Society of Christian Service in the local church who remits to the district 
or conference treasurer of the Woman's Society of Christian Service. The con- 
ference treasurer remits, as designated by the Wesleyan Service Guild local unit, 
to the treasurer of the Woman's Division of Christian Service, and sends the receipt 
on the local unit remittance blank to the unit treasurer. 

Section 4- Funds for local church and community activities shall be expended 
by vote of the local unit of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Section 5. Cultivation funds shall be secured and expended in accordance with 
mutual agreement between the conference Woman's Society and the Wesleyan Service 
Guild. 



288 

Article VIII. — Elections 

Section 1. Officers and chairmen of committees shall be elected at the annual 
meeting of the unit. 

Section 2. Elections may be by acclamation or by ballot. The consent of the 
nominee shall be secured before presenting names. 

Section 3. A majority vote of those present and voting is sufficient for election. 
Those elected shall assume their duties at the beginning of the fiscal year. 

Section 4- No officer shall hold the same office for more than four consecutive 
years with the possible exception of the treasurer who may serve eight years. 

Article IX. — Amendments 

Proposed amendments to these bylaws may be made, on the recommendation of 
the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the Woman's Division to 
the Division by a majority vote, at any annual meeting of the Division, provided a 
thirty days' notice is given in writing to all members of the Division by the Executive 
Committee of the Division or by the standing Committee on Constitution and Bylaws 
of the Division. 

Proposed amendments to bylaws of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall be sent 
to the standing Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild of the Woman's Division 
in time for recommendation to the September meeting of the Executive Committee of 
the Division. 



STANDING COMMITTEE OF THE 
WESLEYAN SERVICE GUILD 

Six Members of the Woman's Division of Christian Service 

Mrs. Harold M. Baker, chairman, 3433 Secor Rd., Toledo 6, Ohio 
Mrs. Glenn La-skey, 710 N. Vienna St., Ruston, La. 
Mrs. L. F. Hemenway, 703 Grandview Ave., New Castle, Pa. 
Mrs. E. J. Badgett, 631 Baronne St., New Orleans 12, La. 
Mrs. John Hoyle Jr., 1505 Glenwood Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 
Mrs. B. F. Russell, 410 S. Thurmond St., Sheridan, Wyo. 

Six Jurisdiction Secretaries 

South Central: Mrs. Alice Pletz, P. 0. Box 8192, San Antonio, Tex. 
Northeastern: Miss Margaret A. Peacock, 101 Garner Ave., Buffalo 13, N. Y. 
Southeastern: Mrs. E. V. Ennis, 1536 Holland Ave., Norfolk 9, Va. 
Central: Miss Lillie Florence Arnold, 112 Brown Ave., S. E., Atlanta, Ga. 
North Central: Miss Frieda Blum, 508 First Ave., Hampton, Iowa 
Western: Mrs. Clarence K. Jones, 1775 Circle Dr., Reno, Nev. 

Six Guild Members at Large 

Missionary Education: Dr. Louise Branscomb, 1225 Greensboro St. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

Organization and Promotion: Miss Ruby Mae Hope, 2020 Parrott Ave., 
Waco, Tex. 

Spiritual Life : Mrs. Martha M. Harvey, 4738 S. Kenwood Ave., Chicago 15, 111. 

Status of Women: Mrs. Juanita Hill, 2426 Madison Ave., Baltimore 17, Md. 

Supply Work: Mrs. Paul Kitzmiller, 409 Shelton St., Dallas, Ore. 

Christian Social Relations: Miss Ruth Foy, 18 Clifton, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



ANNUITY AGREEMENT 





WOMAN'S DIVISION OF CHRISTI/IN SERVICE 

8F THE 

BD/Wn DF MISSIONS OF THE METHODIST EHUHCH 



Cite 3ncome (Sift Certificate 



Sifts (SerttfttB Djal of — 

(hereinafter referred to as rhc Doner J, has donated and paid to the \Fon_o . Ihvaaoa of Christian Scrvtst of trie Board oi Missions of The Method: 
Chorch thereinafter referred to at the Woman's Dtviuoni for its gtneral _K1 and purpose*, the sum gf _ - 




The 'St'oman'? Division hereby bind 
Upon the death of , 



_T>oil__ per year, in half \ 



Jimem. _g the fas dav of January and luly in Batch year. 

_. t.f _ _ . ___ 'aid anoaity shall ce_se; but the le£.ai representatives 

_ shaO he entitled to act unpaid annuity accruing prtor to said annuitant's death. 

The acceptance of ebb agreement makes all it: recitals and stipulations bindma upon ibe annuitant i i | and . _ — legal representatives. 

Ill SttltrOS BllfTMaf. the Woman's Di-lsKjn of Christian Service of the Board of M_tions of The Meihodin Church 

has caused its corporate s*a! to he hereunto .-shred and these present ;o be sijrnej bv its .resident *nd Treasurer at New York Ors. 

New York, this _ _ day os _ _ VD.l? 

Wm-s's DM_toa _f ESrlrlisti Servta of tbe Hoar, af WirakiiK af file Mrtfc__i_l Omrch 





For further information on the Annuity Plan write to the Treasurer of the 
Woman's Division of Christian Service, 150 Fifth Avenue, New York 11, 

New York. 



"Give of thy sons to bear the message glorious; 
Give of thy wealth to speed them on their way." 
— The Methodist Hymnal, No. 475 



FORM OF BEQUEST 
I give and bequeath to the Woman's Division of Christian 
Service of the Board of Missions of The Methodist Church, in- 
corporated by a special act of the Legislature of the state of 
New York, with headquarters at 150 Fifth Avenue, New York 

City, New York, the sum of $ , and the receipt of the 

Treasurer thereof shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors 
for the same. 

For further information write to 

MARGUERITE HARRIS, Treasurer 

Woman's Division of Christian Service 

150 Fifth Avenue, Room 626 

New York 11, New York 



289 



290 



Jurisdiction Officers and Secretaries 

Northeastern Jurisdiction 

President Mrs. Wallace N. Streeter. .516 Van Buren St., N. \V., Washington 12, D. C. 

Vice-President Mrs. Carl B. Searing 7216 Wayne Ave., Philadelphia 19, Pa. 

Recording Secretary Mrs. G. Albin Dahlquist 481 Fair St., Providence 5, R. I. 

Treasurer Mrs. Arthur H. MacCorkle 126 Beecher Ave., Cheltenham, Pa. 

SECRETARIES 

Missionary Service for 

Foreign Work Mrs. Clyde LeMessurier 164 Terrace Park, Rochester 11, N. Y. 

Missionary Service for 

Home Work Mrs. Forrest A. Goodrich 620 Maple St., Coraopolis, Pa. 

Christian Social Relations Mrs. Emil M. Hartl 27 Wheeler St., Boston 16, Mass. 

Promotion Mrs. L. F. Hemenway 703 Grandview Ave., New Castle, Pa. 

Missionary Education Mrs. Paul G. Masters 1483 Welsh Rd., Huntingdon Valley, Pa. 

Wesleyan Service Guild Miss Margaret A. Peacock 101 Garner Ave., Buffalo 13, N. Y. 

Student Work Mrs. John A. Fetzer 32 Fawn Ave., Salamanca, N. Y. 

Youth Work Mrs. Adam D. Minnigh 1117 Chestnut St., Franklin, Pa. 

Children's Work Mrs. Granville Hooper 123 Vue de L'Eau St., Cambridge, Md. 

Literature and Publications Mrs. Arthur Wright 81 W. Main St., Webster, N. Y. 

Supply Work Mrs. L. Gerald King 79 Pine St., Deposit, N. Y. 

Spiritual Life Mrs. Austin Bagshaw 506 Church St., Spencer, W. Va. 

Status of Women Mrs. J. D. Nickey 901 Quincy Ave., Scranton 10, Pa. 

Missionary Personnel Mrs. Ewart E. Turner 1712 W. Genesee St., Syracuse 4, N. Y. 

Southeastern Jurisdiction 

President Mrs. E. U. Robinson P. O. Box 516, Gallatin, Tenn. 

Vice-President Mrs. David J. Cathcart 127 E. Maxwell St., Lakeland, Fla. 

Recording Secretary Mrs. John Hoyle, Jr 1505 Glenwood Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 

Treasurer Mrs. B. R. Stout 1811 Riverside Dr., Knoxville 15, Tenn. 

SECRETARIES 

Missionary Service for 

Foreign Work Mrs. E. V. Perry Rolling Fork, Miss. 

Missionary Service lor 

Home Work Mrs. Charles M. Henderson. .4041 N. Walnut Grove Circle, Memphis, Tenn. 

Christian Social Relations Mrs. Ralph T. Wilson, Sr Route 3, Laurens, S. C. 

Promotion Mrs. J. Fletcher McLeod 1540 College Ct., Montgomery 6, Ala. 

Missionary Education Mrs. E.L. Glossbrenner 3814 Hawthorne Ave., Richmond 22, Va. 

Wesleyan Service Guild Mrs. E. V. Ennis 1536 Holland Ave., Norfolk 9, Va. 

Student Work Mrs. O. D. Thomas P. O. Box 2523, University, Ala. 

Youth Work Mrs. Carl H. King 310 S. Fulton St., Salisbury, N. C. 

Children's Work Mrs. Charles H. Robeson 3532 Roxboro Rd., N. E., Atlanta, Ga. 

Literature and Publications Miss Nancy M. Cawood 112 French Ave., Winchester, Ky. 

Supply Work Mrs. William B. Bourne P. O. Box 541, Brunswick, Ga. 

Spiritual Life Mrs. H. T. Tipps Box 223, Clarksville, Tenn. 

Status of Women Mrs. Dwight L. Fouts 119 E. James St., Mount Olive, N. C. 

Missionary Personnel Mrs. Charles F. Ratcliffe 13 S. Hathaway Rd., Spring Hill, Ala. 

Central Jurisdiction 

President Mrs. George W. Carter, Jr 2021 Louisiana Ave., New Orleans 15, La. 

Vice-President Mrs. S. D. Bankston 2316 16th Ave., S., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Recording Secretin v Mrs. William A. Henry 1007 Poplar St., Wilmington 1, Del. 

Treasurer ' .Mrs. G. M. Phelps 537 E. Bragg St., Greensboro, N. C 

SECRETARIES 

Missionary Service for 

Foreign Work Mrs. Robert K. Gordon Box 226, Dillon, S. C. 

Missionary Service for 

Home Work Mrs. P. C. Holland 1025 Fuller St., Knoxville 15, Tenn. 

Christian Social Relations Mrs. John W. Curry 163 S. Coit St., Florence, S. C. 

Promotion Miss Grace W. Arnold 2746 Hedgewood Dr., N. W., Atlanta 11, Ga. 

Missionary Education Mrs. M. M. Drake 1032 Second Ave., S., Nashville, Tenn. 

Wesleyan Service Guild Miss Lillie Florence Arnold 112 Brown Ave., S. E., Atlanta, Ga. 

Student Work Mrs. Hilda B. Thomas 234 Randolph Place, N. E., Washington 2, D. C. 

Youth Work Mrs. L. G. Israel 1317 Florida St., Baton Rouge, La. 

Children's Work